moon landing

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twinbeanie

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I have a question regarding those who do not believe we landed on the moon. Can't we see the surface of the moon with a strong telescope even the hubble? to see the items left on the surface of the moon? This would prove with pictures that yes we have landed on the moon and look at the stuff we left. Hey if it's strong enough you might see the flag. Anyway, just wondering.
 
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joshbe

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crazy eddie is right, the people that believe this are like the people that belive in geocentrism. And, no earth based telescope is strong enough to view the equipment. Why would anyone use hubble? Its expensive, and there is no point. Just leave these nutters be.
 
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Saiph

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Hubble can't really do it either, as the issue is that of resolution, and hubble just isn't physically large enough to resolve such fine detail. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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nexium

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I think resolution is limited by the lens diameter in wave lengths of blue light. We could possibly observe the moon landing arifacts in ultraviolet light, with a very large telescope (in low Earth orbit) designed for ultraviolet. Neil
 
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CalliArcale

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>However, the "splash" pattern left by the rocket exhaust in the lunar soil from the LEM's takeoff and landing HAS been imaged.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />I love that pic. It's Apollo 15's landing site, imaged by the Clementine Orbiter. Clementine was a technology demonstrator mission funded by the USAF. Somebody was sufficiently motivated to convince them that if they were going to test some new technology, why not throw in some lunar science while they were at it? They were persuaded, and some lovely pictures were the result.<br /><br />Here's a link to an MPEG of Clementine's shots of the Apollo 16 site: click here.<br /><br />And here's the <i>piece de resistence</i>, the Apollo 15 landing site, with various "photometric anomalies" (i.e. things the image team found interesting) labeled. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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atticus808

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are there any pictures of the landing pads on the ship that first landed on the moon?<br />or close to it?
 
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telfrow

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Photos like this one? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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telfrow

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You'll find plenty more here. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

Guest
Also visit The Project Apollo Archive, a privately run website by Kipp Teague. Most of the images are linked to the archive telfrow pointed you to, but this presents them in a very easy-to use way. There are a number of excellent pictures specifically of the LM footpads, taken for both scientific and engineering analysis. The landing site conditions did vary from location to location (although not a lot; the sites were carefully chosen to give the best chance of a safe, successful landing). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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betafox

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One advise. Be very sceptical about these landing photos.<br />It's a hoax. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
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telfrow

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Please, leave it in Phenomena. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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pizzaguy

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Actually there IS a hoax here: The hoax is a hoax. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <br /><br />(Think of the MILLIONS of $ made off those books.) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1"><em>Note to Dr. Henry:  The testosterone shots are working!</em></font> </div>
 
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telfrow

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Very true. <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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betafox

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(Think of the MILLIONS of $ spent off those hollywood films.)
 
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atticus808

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actually there was a debate on wether or not is was a hoax<br />i'm not saying it is or it isn't but i was just brining up the dust on the landing pads thing
 
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ghgckd

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I'm new here and I am very interested to know why we have not started to colonize the moon.&nbsp; This just makes sense to me.&nbsp; Anyone know if we are even planning to do that?&nbsp; Just wondering as I am facinated by the whole idea of it.
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'm new here and I am very interested to know why we have not started to colonize the moon.&nbsp; This just makes sense to me.&nbsp; Anyone know if we are even planning to do that?&nbsp; Just wondering as I am facinated by the whole idea of it. <br />Posted by ghgckd</DIV><br /><br />Welcome to Space.com!</p><p>The quick answer is lack of funding. If we'd had enough money after the Apollo missions, we'd have colonies on the moon now.</p><p>The fact is, the budget has been hacked in half or more since then, so NASA doesn what it can with the dollars that Congress provides. Which is a pitifully small amount.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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h2ouniverse

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'm new here and I am very interested to know why we have not started to colonize the moon.&nbsp; This just makes sense to me.&nbsp; Anyone know if we are even planning to do that?&nbsp; Just wondering as I am facinated by the whole idea of it. <br />Posted by ghgckd</DIV><br /><br />Hi and welcome.</p><p>There are plans to establish a base at the South Pole of the moon. Essentially NASA-led. Some robotic missions are preparing this scenario.</p><p>* NASA's LCROSS, with crashing into South Pole to detect potential water</p><p>* NASA's South Pole Aitken Basin mission (in assessment phase, not yet selected)</p><p>* ESA's Moon-NEXT Lunar Lander mission (aiming at landing at South Pole) (in&nbsp;assessment phase)</p><p>plus many orbiters from NASA, Europe, Japan, India, China...</p><p>The manned part of it seems under jeopardy though.</p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi and welcome.There are plans to establish a base at the South Pole of the moon. Essentially NASA-led. Some robotic missions are preparing this scenario.* NASA's LCROSS, with crashing into South Pole to detect potential water* NASA's South Pole Aitken Basin mission (in assessment phase, not yet selected)* ESA's Moon-NEXT Lunar Lander mission (aiming at landing at South Pole) (in&nbsp;assessment phase)plus many orbiters from NASA, Europe, Japan, India, China...The manned part of it seems under jeopardy though. <br />Posted by h2ouniverse</DIV><br /><br />Again, I repeat, There are plans, but so far the money required to accomplish such a mission isn't even close to being there. NASA's budget would have to be doubled to even consider it a reasonable possibility within the next 25 years.</p><p>I suspect that ain't gonna happen.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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