Moon water discovered.

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derekmcd

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<h1><font size="2">Moon water discovered: Dampens Moon-formation theory</font></h1><p>Using new techniques, scientists have discovered for the first time that tiny beads of volcanic glasses collected from two Apollo missions to the Moon contain water. The researchers found that, contrary to previous thought, water was not entirely vaporized in the violent events that formed the Moon. The new study suggests that the water came from the Moon's interior and was delivered to the surface via volcanic eruptions over 3 billion years ago. The finding calls into question some critical aspects of the "giant impact" theory of the Moon's formation and may have implications for the origin of possible water reservoirs at the Moon's poles. The research is published in the July 10, 2008, issue of <em>Nature</em>.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Rest of article here:</p><p>http://www.physorg.com/news134828986.html</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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voyagerwsh

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Moon water discovered: Dampens Moon-formation theoryUsing new techniques, scientists have discovered for the first time that tiny beads of volcanic glasses collected from two Apollo missions to the Moon contain water. The researchers found that, contrary to previous thought, water was not entirely vaporized in the violent events that formed the Moon. The new study suggests that the water came from the Moon's interior and was delivered to the surface via volcanic eruptions over 3 billion years ago. The finding calls into question some critical aspects of the "giant impact" theory of the Moon's formation and may have implications for the origin of possible water reservoirs at the Moon's poles. The research is published in the July 10, 2008, issue of Nature.&nbsp;Rest of article here:http://www.physorg.com/news134828986.html <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV></p><p>Moon was not as "bone dry" as many folks&nbsp;thought before&nbsp;and moon may still contain liquid&nbsp;water inside its&nbsp;crust. We found water in many places of our solar system, Mars, Europa, Encceladus, Mercury (water vaper)&nbsp;and now the Moon!</p>
 
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kelvinzero

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<p>We could probably dig a much deeper hole on the moon than the earth.. I mean that in a positive way :)</p><p>Does this actually suggest there&nbsp;should be pockets of useful concentrations of water deep within the moon?</p>
 
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weeman

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>We could probably dig a much deeper hole on the moon than the earth.. I mean that in a positive way :)Does this actually suggest there&nbsp;should be pockets of useful concentrations of water deep within the moon? <br />Posted by kelvinzero</DIV><br /><br />I'd say it suggests that larger amounts of water may have existed early in the Moon's history, perhaps not long after it formed. Based on the cooling process that they mention in the article, it sounds as though more water existed on the&nbsp;Moon a few billion years ago, and today we are only seeing the last tiny amounts that can be detected. Obviously the samples show proof that trace amounts of water can still be detected, but it doesn't seem to suggest that an abundant amount of water still exists below the surface. </p><p>Of course, there's still the speculation and theory that ice could exist below the surface at the Moon's poles. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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Crossover_Maniac

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Another source of water and other violatile elements on the moon: comets and asteroids.&nbsp; I don't see why we wouldn't find remnants of old comets and asteroids buried underneath moon regolith inside lunar craters.&nbsp; If the material is deep enough, it'll maintain a constant temperature and kept from vaporizing during the 14-day long lunar day. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Feel the Hope-nosis </div>
 
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kelvinzero

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'd say it suggests that larger amounts of water may have existed early in the Moon's history, perhaps not long after it formed. Based on the cooling process that they mention in the article, it sounds as though more water existed on the&nbsp;Moon a few billion years ago, and today we are only seeing the last tiny amounts that can be detected. Obviously the samples show proof that trace amounts of water can still be detected, but it doesn't seem to suggest that an abundant amount of water still exists below the surface. Of course, there's still the speculation and theory that ice could exist below the surface at the Moon's poles. <br />Posted by weeman</DIV></p><p>I only have a vague understanding of luna geology but previously as I understand it all water was lost when it was created from the earth. It is a bit easier to imagine losing water while the whole thing is molten and perhaps may have collesced from a cloud of molten particles. (though still the maths is&nbsp; a little beyond me :) )</p><p>I would have guessed the water would still be there if it was there after the moon solidified. I saw a value of up to 750ppm which is still less than 1:1000 but perhaps if geological activity created chambers deep beneath the surface&nbsp;water might&nbsp;concentrate there rather than escape.<br /></p>
 
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warpfactor999

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Looks like NASA works about as fast as the FDA!!!!.....C'mon???!!!
 
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kelvinzero

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Looks like NASA works about as fast as the FDA!!!!.....C'mon???!!! <br />Posted by warpfactor999</DIV></p><p>Or another way of looking at it is that the original investment in returning material from the moon is still paying off. These tests did not even exist at the time, and probably would be impractical to perform on the moon in anycase. No wonder people are so interested in returning samples from Mars.<br /></p>
 
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