New Horizons: Jupiter Encounter. Through 2007.

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3488

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Hi all.<br /><br />It has been suggested to me to start a new thread on this.<br /><br />I have bought over a few pictures from the previous New Horizons thread.<br />----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br />Below Jupiter & volcanic Io from 81 million Kilometres. New Horizons LORRI camera.<br /><br />Monday 8th January 2007.<br /><br />On Approach: Jupiter and Io.<br /><br />This image was taken on Monday, January 8, 2007, with the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), while the spacecraft was about 81 million kilometers (about 50 million miles) from Jupiter. <br /><br />Jupiter's volcanic moon Io is to the right; the planet's Great Red Spot is also visible. The image was one of 11 taken during theMonday, January 8, 2007 approach sequence, which signaled the opening of the New Horizons Jupiter encounter. <br /><br />Even in these early approach images, Jupiter shows different face than what previous visiting spacecraft - Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, Voyager 2, Galileo & Cassini - have seen. <br /><br />Regions around the equator and in the southern tropical latitudes seem remarkably calm, even in the typically turbulent "wake" behind the Great Red Spot. <br /><br />The New Horizons science team will scrutinize these major meteorological features - including the unexpectedly calm regions - to understand the diverse variety of dynamical processes on the solar system's largest planet. These include the newly formed Little Red Spot, the Great Red Spot and a variety of zonal features.<br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute.<br /> <br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Sorry did not attach.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Jupiter's Red Spot Junior, boxed. New Horizons LORRI camera.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Blow up of Jupiter Great Red Spot gawping at Io. New Horizons, LORRI camera.<br /><br />Monday 8th January 2007.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hope you all find the below as interesting as I do??<br /><br />---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br />From Alan Stern Principal Investigator of New Horizons.<br /><br />The first preliminary cylindrical projection map of Jupiter's meteorology made by New Horizons, obtained by our LORRI high-resolution telescope-imager in early January 2007.<br /><br />A year ago this past Friday, on January 19, 2006, New Horizons lifted off on a pillar of smoke and fire and began its journey to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. How quickly that year has passed. New Horizons and our ground team accomplished a great deal in that first year of flight, including:<br /><br />A complete checkout of the spacecraft and its redundant subsystems. <br /><br />Three small trajectory correction maneuvers that precisely steered our little craft toward its Pluto aim point, some 2 million kilometers off Jupiter's limb. <br /><br />A complete checkout and initial calibrations of all seven on-board scientific instruments. <br />The design, testing and installation of new guidance and navigation, fault protection/autonomy, and command and data handling software packages that repair bugs found in flight and enable a variety of new capabilities. <br /><br />Tests of target-tracking capabilities during a serendipitous, target of opportunity flyby of the small asteroid 2002 JF56, now officially named "APL" by the International Astronomical Union. <br /><br />Initial planning for the first hibernation phase on the cruise from Jupiter to Pluto. <br /><br />Preparation of more than 700 separate Jupiter science observations scheduled for January-June 2007. <br /><br />The start of Jupiter approach observations on January 6, 2007. <br /><br />In learning to fly our "bird," we've also come to work the kinks out of our ground systems, our ground-based spacecraft simulator, our flight-control processes and our data-reduction and observation plannin <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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Incredibly cool. I'm at once amazed that a year has passed, and astonished at how quickly NH has traveled! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi there more recent Jupiter pics from the LORRI camera New Horizons.<br /><br />Jupiter & Io: Monday 15th January 2007.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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New Horizons LORRI camera.<br /><br />Jupiter: Saturday 20th January 2007.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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New Horizons LORRI camera. <br /><br />Jupiter: Sunday 21st January 2007. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi CalliArcale.<br /><br />It has amazed me too:<br /><br />New images have been released & more amazing detail is showing up.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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rfoshaug

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Does anyone know if we'll get color images once it arrives at Pluto? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff9900">----------------------------------</font></p><p><font color="#ff9900">My minds have many opinions</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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This one has just got to be seen to be believed. Just absolutely incredible. Jupiter, Io & Ganymede.<br /><br />New Horizons LORRI camera.<br />-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br />The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager took this 4-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere. <br /><br />Two of Jupiter's largest storms are visible; the Great Red Spot on the western (left) limb of the planet, trailing the Little Red Spot on the eastern limb, at slightly lower latitude. The Great Red Spot is a 300-year old storm more than twice the size of Earth. The Little Red Spot, which formed over the past decade from the merging of three smaller storms, is about half the size of its older and "greater" counterpart. <br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute.<br /><br />Andrew Brown.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Another incredible image.<br /><br />Jupiter & Ganymede. New Horizons LORRI camera.<br /><br />The Great Red Spot is looking almost straight at New Horizons, with the solar system's largest & most massive moon Ganymede to the right.<br /><br />Sunday 21st January 2007.<br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Sorry rfoshaug.<br /><br />I am just getting blown away by these latest images of the Jupiter system, as the Jupiter system contains some of my favourite solar system objects.<br /><br />The answer to your question is a big yes.<br /><br />New Horizons will take full colour & multispectral images of Pluto & Charon, possibly Nix & Hydra too as well as any other KBO's that New Horizons will rendezvous with (also we will get full colour & multispectral images of Jupiter, Io, etc next month).<br /><br />The reason why at the moment the Jupiter images are monochromatic, is because the immensely powerful telescopic LORRI camera (a bit like the HiRISE on the MRO, currently orbiting Mars) is because it images in super high resolution in grey scale. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Below is my blow up & enhancement of volcanic Io (bottom) & Ganymede (top).<br /><br />Already surface detail is clearly visible on both, particularly the dark circular Galileo Regio & more irregular Marius Regio & the bright tectonically grooved & fractured Nicholson Regio between them on Ganymede, with the ejecta from the large Osiris impact crater to the bottom right.<br /><br />The slightly darker polar regions on Io, made from colder condensed sulphur can be seen also.<br /><br />New Horizons LORRI camera.<br /><br />Wednesday 24th January 2007.<br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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tom_hobbes

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Yes, helluva fast trip to Jupiter! Can't wait for Pluto!<br /><br />Is this faster than Cassini's earlier rendezvous with Jupiter?<br /><br /><br /><br />Great thread 3488. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#339966"> I wish I could remember<br /> But my selective memory<br /> Won't let me</font><font size="2" color="#99cc00"> </font><font size="3" color="#339966"><font size="2">- </font></font><font size="1" color="#339966">Mark Oliver Everett</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
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3488

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Jupiter & ice covered, possibly oceanic Europa.<br /><br />New Horizons LORRI camera.<br /><br />Sunday 21st January 2007.<br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Jupiter & Europa (Europa just in front of Jupiter at the 10 o'clock position). <br /><br />New Horizons LORRI camera. <br /><br />Sunday 21st January 2007. <br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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rfoshaug

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Thanks, 3488! Color images will be great! <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />(although the black and white ones you've posted here are extremely beautiful)... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff9900">----------------------------------</font></p><p><font color="#ff9900">My minds have many opinions</font></p> </div>
 
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lampblack

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<font color="yellow">Is this faster than Cassini's earlier rendezvous with Jupiter?</font><br /><br />Let's see... Cassini was launched (Titan IV-B and Centaur launch system) on Oct. 15, 1997, and closest approach to Jupiter was Dec. 30, 2000. That puts the travel time at three years, two months. So New Horizons is taking about one-third as long to hit the Jovian orbit as Cassini did.<br /><br />Of course, Cassini also took a more circuitous route, with two gravity assist fly-bys of Venus and one of earth. So, I'd be curious to know -- setting aside questions about how long it took to get there -- how fast Cassini was traveling at its closest point of approach to Jupiter compared with New Horizons. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#0000ff"><strong>Just tell the truth and let the chips fall...</strong></font> </div>
 
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jmilsom

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Thanks for taking up the New Horizons flag and all your excellent posts and images Andrew. <br /><br />My PhD pressure is really on now, so I'll just be watching and reading as I can. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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tom_hobbes

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Quicker. Sorry. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#339966"> I wish I could remember<br /> But my selective memory<br /> Won't let me</font><font size="2" color="#99cc00"> </font><font size="3" color="#339966"><font size="2">- </font></font><font size="1" color="#339966">Mark Oliver Everett</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
3

3488

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Yes New Horizons is passing Jupiter at a greater speed than Cassini did, by a comfortable margin.<br /><br />Cassini: 57,600 KPH / 36,000 MPH.<br />New Horizons: 83,800 KPH / 52,000 MPH.<br /><br />The reason being, the Cassini / Huygens only had to go as far as the orbit of Saturn, where as New Horizons is escaping from the solar system, via Pluto & the rest of the KBO, never to return, thus joining Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1 & Voyager 2 in this respect.<br /><br />Below is my blow up & enhancement of Europa against Jupiter's northern hemisphere.<br /><br />New Horizons LORRI camera. <br /><br />Jupiter & Europa: Sunday 21st January 2007. <br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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In reply to jmilsom 'Thanks for taking up the New Horizons flag and all your excellent posts and images Andrew. '<br /><br />I am glad to be doing this. The Jupiter system is fascinating beyond belief & at long last we are going to get another close look.<br /><br />It is a shame that the Galileans & even Amalthea are on the other side of Jupiter at closest approach!!! Timing was a bit naff!!<br /><br />Just checked, no new images as yet.<br /><br />Trajectory of New Horizons passing Jupiter.<br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute. <br /><br />Andrew Brown.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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tom_hobbes

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Thanks for the response above.<br /><br />And looking at the diagram it is a shame.<br /><br />I'd love to see a Cassini equivalent orbiter for the Jupiter system, with a lander or impactor to Europa. I imagine a soft landing would be very fuel expensive. Anyway, I don't wish to derail the thread! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#339966"> I wish I could remember<br /> But my selective memory<br /> Won't let me</font><font size="2" color="#99cc00"> </font><font size="3" color="#339966"><font size="2">- </font></font><font size="1" color="#339966">Mark Oliver Everett</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
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