Origin of Deep-Space Radio Flash Discovered, and It's Unlike Anything Astronomers Have Ever Seen

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Mysterious ultra-fast pinpricks of radio energy keep lighting up the night sky and nobody knows why.

Origin of Deep-Space Radio Flash Discovered, and It's Unlike Anything Astronomers Have Ever Seen : Read more
"The problem concerns a class of blink-and-you'll-miss-them heavenly events known as fast radio bursts (FRBs). In a few thousandths of a second, these explosions produce as much energy as the sun does in nearly a century. Researchers have only known about FRBs since 2007, and they still don't have a compelling explanation regarding their sources."

Very interesting, FRBs produce enormous energies. This suggest the universe is filled with catastrophic processes at work that is hostile to life on Earth - like the FRB sources were much closer. Reports like this suggest the universe astronomers see today is winding down-not up.
 

Ted

Jan 8, 2020
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How much energy is released at the precise moment when those alien ships cross the threshold from normal to FTL drive during acceleration or deceleration? o_O
 
Jan 8, 2020
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If you want to send a message containing information to light-distant listeners, you need to compress the information in time to extremely fast datum bursts so that they will be slowed and still decipherable, due to time dilatation in relativity, to a readable/decryptable rate at reception possibly eons later. That's why we should expect fast bursts that hopefully we can translate to something we can comprehend.
 
Jan 8, 2020
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An intergalactic war is going on in galaxy SDSS J015800.28+654253.0

Entire solar systems are being wiped out, including their inhabitants.

Cross your fingers they haven't noticed us yet.
 
Jan 8, 2020
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An intergalactic war is going on in galaxy SDSS J015800.28+654253.0

Entire solar systems are being wiped out, including their inhabitants.

Cross your fingers they haven't noticed us yet.
That's exactly what the burst message says..... problem is it ended a long time ago ;-)
 
Dec 20, 2019
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"The problem concerns a class of blink-and-you'll-miss-them heavenly events known as fast radio bursts (FRBs). In a few thousandths of a second, these explosions produce as much energy as the sun does in nearly a century. Researchers have only known about FRBs since 2007, and they still don't have a compelling explanation regarding their sources."

Very interesting, FRBs produce enormous energies. This suggest the universe is filled with catastrophic processes at work that is hostile to life on Earth - like the FRB sources were much closer. Reports like this suggest the universe astronomers see today is winding down-not up.
They're just LEDs burning out in our virtual universe.
 
Dec 20, 2019
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Actually there are plausible explanations when you factor in gravitational waves between us and the light source. If the gravitational wave is big enough to fold back on itself, it could release 1,000 years of light in 1 burst.
If there's a fixed source of gravitational waves between us and a galaxy then the galaxy is going to twinkle like an xmas tree.
There's actually a number of scenarios for creating star bursts without blowing up the galaxy. LOL
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Some of the comments in this discussion remind me of the *little green men* reports that came out back in the mid-60s when pulsars were first discovered :) FRBs, what is the maximum measured energy release in joules? Example, 1E+n joules? The answer in the report is provided, some FRBs release as much or more energy than the Sun emits in 100 years.
 
Nov 20, 2019
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What if?..
Maybe it's the starting nuclear fusion of some star,, guided by the gigantic e-m fields formed while accretting into such a body
 
Feb 10, 2020
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What about its positioning, like our position in the Milky Way in the outer bands of a spiral galaxy. Not sure what this may conclude, look at time/age, speed, weight- nearby exoplanets 500 million light years. Not a pulsar again? Our smallish sun produces 38,460 septillion watts (3.846×10 to the power of 26 W) per second x 60 seconds x 60 minutes x 24 hours x 364.25 days x 100 years.=
 
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Ted

Jan 8, 2020
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On a more serious note, it’s hard to imagine how you’d get such energies emitted in a millisecond. Massive objects colliding or collapsing could do it, but they’d be too big to interact that fast. Something moving at a good percentage of light speed and crashing into another object could do it, but that just creates the problem of how did something massive get accelerated that fast in the first place?

I wonder if there are a few asteroids or comets made of antimatter “out there” and these millisecond energy spikes are the results of antimatter-matter collisions? That might produce a fast energy spike with gravitational waves that are too short in time or too weak (since the masses could be much smaller than matter-to-matter impacts) for our technology to detect them. Just a thought (no little green men required this time).
 
Feb 1, 2020
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Whatever the universe is doing, vast expanses of that universe are inimical to life of any kind. We are finding that planets are everywhere, but only a tiny fraction are even faintly friendly to life of any kind, much less intelligent life. Our Earth has been here for around 4 billion years, and even faintly intelligent life has only existed for the last couple of million years. If we are honest, we are threatened by a myriad of possible natural extinction events on top of all the ones that we can visit on ourselves. It only took us around 10,000 years to obtain the ability to destroy ourselves.

Now back up and see this from a universal viewpoint. It seems that it is less than surprising that SETI has not found other intelligences out there to communicate with us. We have only been able to communicate, even with our galactic neighborhood, for about 70 years. It is unclear whether, even now, we are penetrating even that far. With my above referenced list of things that can destroy our species, it is my contention that even if there are a huge number of intelligent species out there, they may not exist with communication capabilities for long enough on a astronomical scale to be able to reach us. If they are more than 100 light years away from us, to pick a number, it will be nice to know that they are out there, but conversation won't exactly be possible. We can stream them huge amounts of data and they can do the same to us, but seeing them up close will be so delayed that neither one of us may even be there or be the same when it is time to return their messages.

"The problem concerns a class of blink-and-you'll-miss-them heavenly events known as fast radio bursts (FRBs). In a few thousandths of a second, these explosions produce as much energy as the sun does in nearly a century. Researchers have only known about FRBs since 2007, and they still don't have a compelling explanation regarding their sources."

Very interesting, FRBs produce enormous energies. This suggest the universe is filled with catastrophic processes at work that is hostile to life on Earth - like the FRB sources were much closer. Reports like this suggest the universe astronomers see today is winding down-not up.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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"If they are more than 100 light years away from us, to pick a number, it will be nice to know that they are out there, but conversation won't exactly be possible."

If they are close to the distance of the nearest stars then we are talking about 5 light years (to pick a number) so we send a message, they receive it 5 years later and reply, and we get the reply 5 years after that. So ten year cycles.

BUT factor in the time taken to decode our message. The Arecibo message (sent to a system 25,000 light years away - was that just dumb?) just proved that we did not even understand our own Solar System. It shows Pluto as a planet, not just as one of several (many?) dwarf planets.

I have an open mind on this issue so I am prepared to play devil's advocate.
 

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