Our Large, Adult Galaxy Is As Massive As 890 Billion Suns

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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"In this case, the researchers found that the dark matter's mass is equal to about 830 billion times the mass of our sun, or about 93% of the galaxy's total mass."

That is a critical component in the mass measurement of 890E+9 solar masses for the Milky Way.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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So just imagine, which kind of the matter could weight so many??? Ofcorse it is very density metal's
metals are placed on the Periodic Table of the Elements, no dark matter is there at this time. Metals can also be detected in starlight too as well as molecules in the gas in the interstellar medium. So far dark matter remains elusive. At the present - there seems to be no evidence that our solar system is composed, 93% of dark matter :)
 
Dec 12, 2019
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metals are placed on the Periodic Table of the Elements, no dark matter is there at this time. Metals can also be detected in starlight too as well as molecules in the gas in the interstellar medium. So far dark matter remains elusive. At the present - there seems to be no evidence that our solar system is composed, 93% of dark matter :)
I'm assure you it is, yes metal's consist in the starlight, because each star has earthcore which consist of the metal's or liquid metal's , so every particles of the light must consist some element's of this beginning.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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I'm assure you it is, yes metal's consist in the starlight, because each star has earthcore which consist of the metal's or liquid metal's , so every particles of the light must consist some element's of this beginning.
My comment - In astronomy, *metals* is jargon for elements on the Periodic Table that are heavier than helium, e.g. lithium, carbon, iron, etc. Stars having *earthcore*, I do not find in references like 'Advanced Stellar Astrophysics" by William K. Rose, Cambridge University Press, 1998.
 
Dec 12, 2019
16
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My comment - In astronomy, *metals* is jargon for elements on the Periodic Table that are heavier than helium, e.g. lithium, carbon, iron, etc. Stars having *earthcore*, I do not find in references like 'Advanced Stellar Astrophysics" by William K. Rose, Cambridge University Press, 1998.
You didn't find it, because no body been there, and this is just a theory. Everything in our life has begin core, I think even a stars must have it too. May be it core consist of the liquid metal's , or something like liquid hydrogen. Did you read that some scientist's transformed liquid hydrogen to the liquid metal's through very high pressure, so this mean that every particle's of any element's could turn in the other element's. - In the other words they are compressed molecule's so high , that this transform to the liquid matter with metal's , so I think in the star must be the same things inside it, because there are great pressure but very hot environment.
Yes metal's mean any element's which denser than gas and has a good conduction, so any metallic element's are metal's, because it is a matter itself. For instance you cannot though that silica are the metal's , but the silica denser than gases, but silica semi-conductor. Silica is something between matter and gases, silica is half burned matter, has numerical value 4. That's why e.g. Saturn has very high amount's of Silica compounds, because the Saturn are 4th planet. A half burned matter.
 
We live in a very big house, but we can't see most of it.

Our Large, Adult Galaxy Is As Massive As 890 Billion Suns : Read more
I don't understand this, I thought our galaxy had around 400 billion stars, that leaves only 490 billion solar masses left for the dark matter, black holes and central supermassive black hole, so how can the dark matter be 93% of the total mass of 890 billion solar masses? I'm making a big assumption that the average star is 1 solar mass just to illustrate my point.:)
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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David-J-Franks in post #8, good question. See my comment in post #2. If 93% of the galaxy is 830 billion solar masses of DM, that leaves 7% normal matter so using 890 billion solar masses total, 7% ~ 62 billion solar masses of normal stuff. That is indeed very low if 400 billion stars counted or estimated unless the galaxy is populated by enormous number of small objects thus ~ 62 billion solar masses :)
 
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