Perseids

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soundphile

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hi<br />how do i find this consterlation? as you can tell i know nothing about the stars, i think i can find the big dipper :S<br />thanks<br />toby
 
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CalliArcale

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The Perseids are a meteor shower, not a constellation, but they get their name from the constellation Perseus, from which they appear to originate.<br /><br />Perseids can appear all over the sky. But their trails will seem to converge on a point in the constellation of Perseus. This is because when the Perseids occur, Earth is actually travelling in that direction, and plowing into a cloud of dust.<br /><br />Here's a webpage about the constellation Perseus: click here. Click the sky chart link for a little context in the sky.<br /><br />For more useful context, try Your Sky. This free service generates custom starmaps for any location and any time.<br /><br />Perseus isn't too terribly far from Cassiopeia, a fairly easy-to-recognize constellation; Cassiopeia will look like a sort of floppy W in the sky, and is usually visible even in cities. So find Cassiopeia first; it's much easier to spot. Get a starchart to find Perseus from there; the direction will depend on the time of year. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Were you asking because of the Perseid meteor shower in August? If so, I can provide lots of tips.<br />Perseus is not as easy to recognize as the Big Dipper or Casseiopia, expecially since one of the brightest stars in Perseus is variable. Sometimes it's the brightest star in the constellation, other times it's not. So the "shape" in the sky sort of changes. <br />If you are asking about the meteor shower, learning to recognize the "W" of Cassiopia is a better starting point to learn your way around the sky<br /><br />Meteor Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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jimcolyer

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I once counted 350 meteors during the August Perseids. It was the night of the 11th and morning of the 12th which I understood to be the peak. Now I am reading August 12th and 13th as the peak. Which is it?<br /><br />Astronomy http://jimcolyer.com/papers/entry?id=2
 
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tfwthom

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Well this year its the morning of the 13th.....but don't let that stop you from going out the 11th to the 12th. <br /><br />Astronomy says the 12th, Sky and Telescope the 13th.<br /><br />August: The Perseids<br />This is the most popular meteor display of the year. You’ll have no interference from moonlight when the Perseids come to maximum strength around the time of new Moon on the night of August 12-13. Peak activity is will occur in the predawn hours of the 13th when the radiant is highest and upwards of 60 meteors per hour can be counted by a single observer in ideal sky conditions. Get out that reclining chair and put on the coffee — it’s always worth doing an all-nighter for the Perseids. <br /><br />Generally, there will be more meteors than usual visible for a few days on either side of a shower's peak. These meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, but you can distinguish them from sporadics because their direction of motion is away from a point in the sky, called the radiant, that's usually in the constellation after which the shower is named. <br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
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3488

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I think the date also varies slightly owing to where we are within the Laep Year cycle.<br /><br />IIRC, the Persieds are set to become later as the stream slowly recesses,<br />due to Jupiter's gravity. <br />In 3007 (won't be around then <img src="/images/icons/frown.gif" /> ), it will be in mid September!!!<br /><br />Perhaps MeteorWayne can confirm / refute that? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> ? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> ? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> ? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> ? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> ? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> ?<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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The predicted peak of the Perseids is between 5 and 7:30 UT on the 13th (1-3:30 AM EDT for the favored Americas). If anything remains of the other peaks prevelent during the 90's, they would be at 9 UT, and 15UT, the last visible from Japan and east Asia.<br /><br />Since the new moon occurs only a few hours earlier (2303 UT on the 12th) it will be a totally moon free night. I would expect a ZHR between 80 and 100 per hour on the peak night, 50-60 the night before and after.<br /><br />The highest rates naturally occur toward dawn when the radiant is highest in the sky.<br /><br />BTW, this is almost entirely a northern hemisphere shower, sorry for all you down under <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br />I'll post more on the Perseids after the July 30 full moon when the August meteor observing window opens up.<br /><br />The radiant this week (before the full moon ) is actually in the constellation of Cassiopia until the morning of the 26th, about halfway between the bottom of Cassiopia's "W" and the Andromeda Galaxy. Rates of 3 or 4 per hour might be expected.<br /><br />Other showers active this week are the alpha Capricornids (very slow meteors), Southern delta-Aquariids (faint meteors), and Pisces Austrinids.<br /><br />All these are best observed from the southern hemisphere, with up to 15 or twenty an hour combined. From the northern hemisphere, it's more like 5 an hour on a good night.<br /><br />That pesky leap year cycle is the reason we meteoricists use solar longitude rather than the date. That measures the position of the earth in it's orbit no matter what the calendar says <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> The Perseid traditional peak occurs at Solar Longitude 140.0-140.1, which gives the time above.<br /><br />I'm not sure of the validity of your Y3K prediction Andrew, I'll research it and respond when I have the facts straight, as accuracy is paramount.<br /><br />Meteor Wayne.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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MeteorWayne<br /><br />As accuracy is paramount, I need answers to some questions that have been keeping me awake. If I am watching the Perseids, and a meteor hits the ground near me, it certainly becomes a meteorite upon striking the ground. BUT what if it bounces? Does it become a meteor again before it comes to rest?<br /><br />Also, if I decide to arrange some 5 gallon buckets in my yard to try and catch a meteor, admittedly my chances will be extremely low, BUT, if I aim the buckets at the radiant, will my chances increase? Would it be worthwhile to have the buckets track the radiant or should I just shift them manually every 15 minutes or so? <br /><br />Eagerly awaiting your answers.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hey, that would be cool to capture a Perseid. <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /><br /><br />Think of what could be learned.<br /><br />AFAIK, they are dust sized particles at best, but there could be some larger fragments!!!!<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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Thank you Andrew.<br /><br />Yes, this year will just be a test of the concept. If it works, I will upgrade to metal buckets next year. The location will be secret, as disclosure would surely result in MeteorWayne hiding in the bushes, tossing in pebbles. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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LOL, interesting questions, billslugg! <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />As to the first, I'd say not. The definition of a meteorite is a meteoroid/meteor that has reached the surface, the operative word being has. So once it's hit, it's a meteorite.<br />My personal opinion is that once the luminous flight has ended, it should properly be called a meteorite during the following "dark flight" to the surface, but that's not technically how the definition is worded.<br />I might just bring that up to the chairman of the IAU Commissionn that deals with such matters, perhaps I can get an "official" definition enacted that would include that. Thanx for the inspiration <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Part Deux:<br /><br />The best direction to point your buckets would be straight up, tilted toward the wind.<br />Perseids never survive intact to the ground, so best case would be to catch the micrometeroids that might be formed from the remnants. But don't hold your breath, since they take weeks to years to slowly drift down to the surface.<br />In fact, your 5 gallon buckets will likely hold many micrometeroids after a few days at any time. The tricky part is identifying them <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />MW<br /><br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Sorry, Andrew, no larger fragments from the Perseids.<br />The impact velocity at the atmosphere is just too high.<br />Even a Perseid as bright as the full moon weighs only a few grams, and will be completely vaporized in the atmosphere. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Gee, you think Meteor Wayne would have one of those, but I don't! <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Thanks MeteorWayne.<br /><br />I did think that might have been the answer. Seeing as its close to New Moon this year,<br />wonder if Perseids might be seen clobbering the night side of the Moon with <br />giant telescopes in the IR wavelengths?<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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IR telescopes wouldn't be very happy pointing at the sun <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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The IMO on the fly graph is now up and running.<br /> Perseids Live <br /><br />"Data has been received from 9 observers in 6 countries. Thank you for your efforts!" <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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I was going to write up the Perseids, and may add more later, but decided to copy this month's NAMN Notes article.<br />The North American Meteor Network is a group organized in the mid 90's to aid in meteor observations across North America and the world.<br />Costs nothing to join, and you can learn a lot!<br />I've already recruited one sucker...err new observer from here at SDC <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Cathy Hall, from the Great White North, writes the NAMN notes, and she did such a fine job, I'll just post what she wrote. In 2 months, I will be taking over as writer of the NAMN notes....as you can see, I've got some big shoes to fill!!<br /><br />1. Perseids - Highlight of the Summer...<br /><br />The Perseid meteor shower (PER) is the highlight of the summer meteor<br />season. This year's shower is also very favorable - as it occurs very close<br />to both new moon and a weekend.<br /><br />The Perseids are one of the oldest meteor showers that mankind has records<br />for. The earliest reference to the shower seems to have been in the year 36<br />A.D. in China. Because the path of the Perseids is highly inclined to the<br />ecliptic, it has not been affected as much over the millennia by the<br />disturbing influences of our major planets that travel basically along the<br />ecliptic path. As a result, the Perseids are a reliable meteor shower, seen<br />in strength each year.<br /><br />The Perseids were also the first meteor shower to be proven to be associated<br />with a comet. This was found by Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli (1835-1910),<br />more often remembered for giving the name canals or channels to the markings<br />on the planet Mars. The parent body of the Perseid shower is called Comet<br />109P/Swift-Tuttle after its discovery in 1862 by several Americans - Lewis<br />Swift of Marathon, New York and Horace Tuttle of Harvard Observatory,<br />Massachusetts. In late August and early September of that year, the comet<br />reached a magnitude <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Dr Peter Jenniskens has created a web site where you can see rate predictions for the Perseids (and September's Aurigids, the LEonids in Nov, and Geminids in Dec.<br />The rest of the page is interesting reading as well..<br /><br /> here's the link <br /><br />It's the section titled "Calculate the Rate of Meteors at your site."<br /><br />Currently Perseids is the default, but check to make sure.<br />Select your location (there are quite a few listed worldwide, you also can enter custom LAt/Long and time offset if needed, but picking the closest location should suffice.<br /><br />Select observing location (Downtown, Suburbs, Coutryside, Mountaintop)<br />These would be (I assume) Limiting Magnitude of your slies around 3.5, 5, 5.75 and 6.5....I will ask him exactly what values are used)<br /><br />Select the date. The dates are in standard meteor format, including the evening date, and after midnight date; for example tonight would be Aug 4-5. Check DST if it is used in your area.<br /><br /><br />Once you have the answers, it's fun to see what happens to the rate if you move from Mountaintop to Countryside to Suburb to Dowbtown.<br /><br />For example for NYC, the peak Perseid hourly rate goes from />100 on a montaintop (very dark skies) to < 10/hour in the city.<br />Thats for Aug 12-13.<br />So you can see what bright skies do to meteor showers, and why I am such a PITA on the issue of light pollution <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Meteor Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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I thought it always cooperated in Southern California <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Had the TV tuned to PBS, and was shocked to hear a 1 minute discussion of the Perseid shower.<br /><br />Of course, the final line was "Keep Looking Up" so many can guess who it was <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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deapfreeze

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I am also off Monday and Tuesday as well. So as long as the weather is good I will be out both nights. I am hoping it clears tonight as I will be out tonight if it does. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#0000ff"><em>William ( deapfreeze ) Hooper</em></font></p><p><font size="1">http://deapfreeze-amateur-astronomy.tk/</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Yes, the one time I observed in your 'hood, we went up to the mountains.<br />Only about 30 miles outside of SD.<br />It was truly amazing for an east coast guy like me.<br /><br />It was for the 2004 Geminids, my best rate was over 120/Hr observed, ZHR was /> 140.<br /><br />I remember asking Bob Lunsford, my host what that fuzzy blob "over there" was.<br /><br />It was the Beehive, looking like a comet the size of the full moon.<br /><br />Wow, very cool. Amazing. Spectacular. Fantabulous.<br />{reaching for Thesaurus} <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Think I saw one about 40 minutes ago.<br /><br />From Cassiopeia along Andromeda towards Pegasus. It was not even totally dark<br />(although almost was).<br /><br />Went out to see the ISS pass right over. Pretty impressive.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Well, it's Friday, time to bump this.<br /><br />The IMO on the fly ZHR graph has moved to here <br /><br />As of 1430 UT on August 10th, the peak ZHR so far is 28 based on 1051 Perseids in 233 observing intervals. Observations have been logged from 45 observeres in 13 countries (sadly, I am the only one from the US).<br /><br />The standard peak is Monday morning between 0500 and 0730 UT.<br />(1AM-3:30 AM EDT).<br /><br />Dr Jenniskens has predicted a short filament peak at 0400 UT of bright meteors (r= 1.9) lasting about an hour. (midnight EDT). (ZHR ~ 200?)<br />Could be an impressive little burst! <br /><br />Other short peaks of enhanced activity have been predicted at<br />2242 UT Aug 12<br />2255 UT Aug 12<br />0027 UT Aug 13<br />0900 UT Aug 13<br />1000 UT Aug 13<br />1500 UT Aug 13<br /><br />None of these are expected to be very spectaucular.<br /><br />I observed last on the morning of the 9th, counting 14 Perseids in 2 1/2 hours. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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That is correct. Even here on the east coast, with the low radiant elevation it will likely only be a slight peak, but if it happens, my data will help prove it.<br /><br />The end of the Perseid main peak is reasonable for the left coast, and after all you get the Aurigid outburst on Aug 31-Sep 1 <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br />We get nothin' out of that <img src="/images/icons/frown.gif" /> <br /><br />Edited for typo <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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