Question about big bang theory

How did that singular particle get its energy to initiate big bang??
This is a complete unknown. The limit of physics may not be able to go all the way to time = 0, though physics can get incredibly close.

BBT begins not at t=0, but a short time before that. This keeps the theory testable and avoids metaphysics and religion, for that matter.
 
Nov 19, 2021
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As I read somewhere "there is no net positive energy in the universe". The positive energy of the matter is exactly balanced by the negative potential energy of the expansion. I don't understand it so I can't answer any challenges, I just read it somewhere.
 
Aug 14, 2020
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As I read somewhere "there is no net positive energy in the universe". The positive energy of the matter is exactly balanced by the negative potential energy of the expansion. I don't understand it so I can't answer any challenges, I just read it somewhere.
One place to look, and there are several others, in books and on the web:

Negative energy - Wikipedia

I remember a long time ago reading that when many of his physicist colleagues finally realized this total of energy and worried over it as the totality of energy in the universe (what it might mean), Stephen Hawking told them to quit being bothered with it . . . it was nothing to bother with since the universe was already there (zero balanced between positive and negative energy).

My picture:
I make it that the Cosmological Constant is Base2 binary base, '0' and/or '1' . . . the Universe (U), the Big Mirror. Infinity = '1' (constant!).

The Universe (U) mirrors itself to infinities ('1') and/or ('0' ('-1')) | mirrors itself to infinities ('-1') and/or ('0' ('1')).

Multiverse = (Planck) Big Crunch (M) | Big Vacuum (C = C , , , squaring (C^2)) | (Planck) Big Bang (E) | Simultaneous Equivalents (M) (E).

Is it particle or wave? | Is it point or plane?

It's a multi-dimensional Multiverse Universe.
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Try to imagine it if you can: In an infinity of universes (u), how many black holes? In an infinity of space (spaces), how many black holes? In an infinity of time (times), how many black holes? The 'Black Hole' simultaneously everywhere and nowhere.

And then, simultaneously, there is the other, also simultaneously everywhere and nowhere.
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I repeat: It's a multi-dimensional Multiverse Universe.
 
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No real answer to how the universe came into being from a particle.
Seems like an unlikely scenario for it to happen then expand into nothing from nothing.
Easier solution is that (nothing) was unstable or carried a potential energy.
Fluctuation was the result of that and energy balance of fluctuations particle creation did the rest.
A BB might be some very long time scale away from nothing=fluctuation=particles= mergers=to much E=BB.

Smoother line of natural processes than a mystery particle just happened. :)
JMO
 
Aug 2, 2022
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As I read somewhere "there is no net positive energy in the universe". The positive energy of the matter is exactly balanced by the negative potential energy of the expansion. I don't understand it so I can't answer any challenges, I just read it somewhere.
This is very close to the current understanding. Space containing a gravitational field has a negative energy density due to the gravitational field (read Alan Guth's book). Mass with positive energy creates a gravitational field with a negative energy; creation of the negative energy also releases the positive energy that shows up as the mass-energy. A chicken-and-egg situation but since quantum mechanics is fuzzy we have:

initial vacuum with zero energy as an initial state -> final state with total energy zero, positive energy in real mass-energy and negative energy contained in the gravitational field created by that mass-energy.
 

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