Question about universe again

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lukman

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Big Bang inflated the space, Universe is expanding in the space created by big bang, is it right? Or Universe is still expanding and inflating space? According to scientist, our universe is stretch around 150billion light years, does that mean the distance from one end star to another end? or is that the space itself? Are there spaces after the farthest object? What lies beyond the space? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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<i><br />Big Bang inflated the space, Universe is expanding in the space created by big bang, is it right?</i><br /><br />Yes<br /><i><br />Universe is still expanding and inflating space?</i><br /><br />Yes, Newton's 3rd Law: An object in motion stays in motion, unless a force acts on it.<br /><i><br />According to scientist, our universe is stretch around 150billion light years, does that mean the distance from one end star to another end? or is that the space itself?</i><br /><br />It's space itself.<br /><i><br /> Are there spaces after the farthest object? What lies beyond the space? </i><br /><br />Physicists say Nothing. Or, space with no time. Or no space-time. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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dannyd

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lukman - I refer you to the oft quoted - "The universe is not only stranger than we imagine - it is stranger than we can imagine." dayll
 
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newtonian

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lukman - 150 bly is roughly the diameter deduced from the radius deduced from the co-moving distance now of the furthest objects we have observed which were 13.7 billion light years away but are now some 78 billion light years away.<br /><br />Double this and you have a diameter of c. 150 bly.<br /><br />However, there may well be more universe beyond that!<br /><br />The observable universe is not likely the entire universe.<br /><br />No, are not talking about just space here - rather we are talking about observable objects in space + comoving distance in the interim time with space expanding.<br /><br />We do not know if there is an edge to our universe. Some say it is boundless - many say it is finite rather than infinite.<br /><br />It is possible some objects have achieved escape velocity from our universe's gravity and light - in which case would you consider such objects still part of our universe? <br /><br />BTW - there could very well be other universes out there!
 
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SpeedFreek

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All the above answers are totally valid. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br /><font color="yellow"> Big Bang inflated the space, Universe is expanding in the space created by big bang, is it right? </font><br /><br />Well the theory goes that the big bang happened, and in the milliseconds afterwards, the universe inflated from a microscopic size to a few meters across, violating the speed of light. But it was space that inflated, not the matter inside it, so there is no violation of the laws of physics here.<br /><br />Then space (including the matter in it) started expanding and continues to expand. Currently we can see a universe around 27 billion ly across, but that visible universe is now over 150 billion ly across due to the comoving distance. We don't know how much more there is.<br /><br /><font color="yellow"> Or Universe is still expanding and inflating space? </font><br /><br />Supposedly, the inflation only happened in the milliseconds after the big-bang. Now there is only expansion.<br /><br /><font color="yellow"> According to scientist, our universe is stretch around 150billion light years, does that mean the distance from one end star to another end? </font><br /><br />No, that is the comoving distance of our universe. This is our observable (not visible) universe. One day we may be able to see 78 billion light years in every direction, but not for another 65 billion years or so! And of course, by that time, those distant objects will be even further away. Space and time are intrinsically linked. There is probably much more universe than that!<br /><br /><font color="yellow"> Are there spaces after the farthest object? </font><br /><br />We don't know, as we cannot observe the "edge" of the universe, or even know if it has an "edge"<br /><br /><font color="yellow"> What lies beyond the space? </font><br /><br />Again we don't know, but we can suppose that whatever is outside our universe (if there is an outsi <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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delster45

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Is it feasible that eventually black holes could merge together and cause the universe to start retracting back to a point where there would be another big bang? This in effect would mean the big bang wasn’t the beginning of the universe but merely part of the cycle that the universe undergoes.
 
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vogon13

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Black holes dissipate into the void before that can happen.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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newtonian

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delster45 - Ah, the oscillating universe theory - many models.<br /><br />I didn't realize this theory has been revived recently as a Big Bounce model.<br /><br />As vogon correctly posts, black holes and all the rest expand to beyond where we can currently observe.<br /><br />In other words, current data/evidence supports the conclusion that our universe will expand eternally.<br /><br />But I am curious if you have some other cyclic model you are talking about - or are you thinking independently?<br /><br />The latter is fine, btw. Outside the box thought stimulates critical scientific analysis which then often refines our understanding.<br /><br />On another of my threads, I question whether, in fact, our universe is accelerating because of loss of mass within a reaction edge causing less gravity and hence acceleration.<br /><br />I don't know where that thread went btw!
 
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delster45

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Yes I am thinking independently, do you think if all the matter in the universe did eventually come together due to gravity, would the area the matter used to take up still count as the universe? Even though it's really nothing?
 
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nexus555

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I believe the same thing you do. I have always believed there will be a galaxy + size blackhole which will consume the universe just to cause another big bang.<br /><br />Either that, or normal/supermassive blackholes create alternate universes with the singularity that they have. I believe they may pull spacetime so much that it "tears." The alternate universe would be smaller... but in a smaller universe, size is relative. What if our universe is small?<br /><br />Who knows!
 
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