questions on upgrading my scope

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newboncntry

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When i was a kid i had all types of small or "toy" scopes i would use for hours in my backyard. Now that im older and have money of my own to spend, I decided to get back into astronomy. A couple months ago i bought a SVP 127mm Mak. cassegrain, which turned out to be a really nice piece of equipment. Although, I am looking for something a little bigger to satisfiy my large appetite for viewing the night sky and deep space objects. I am looking to see better surface details on mars, the 127 just doesnt quite cut it. Also looking to view more detailed objects of some faint nebulas. I was just wondering how much better the quality of planetary and deep faint objects i would get if i upgraded to a 150, or preferably the 180mm Mak. money is not an issue. Can someone please let me know before i spend a big chunk of extra change.
 
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tfwthom

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Well you are doing apples and oranges thing.<br /><br />If you want great planetary views you need and want a refractor. If you want great deep space objects you want a reflector.<br /><br />You have a mak well that's a crossover scope (like SCT's) they are OK at both but not as great at either. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
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newboncntry

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Ah, alright I guess that makes sense considering a cassegrain has mirrors and lenses. Now if i purchased a nice refractor would it not allow me to view good deep space objects?<br />
 
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MeteorWayne

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Actually, that's not correct.<br />A pure Cassagrain uses only reflectors.<br />There are many adaptions that use both. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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newboncntry

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Ok well then i guess i am back to square one, can someone give me the viewing pros and cons of each type and suggest the best scope (just the optical tube) at around an 800-1000 dollar range. I dont know the right people or have the money to try each one out before i make a final decision
 
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MeteorWayne

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By the way, welcome to Space.com.<br /><br />You could maybe try different types if you visited a local Astronomy club.<br /><br />Your eye and your goals have much to do with what kind of scope is best for you.<br /><br />If you need help finding a local astronomy club, either post here or PM me.<br /><br />When I have time, I'll find a link for you; they've been posted, probably in this and many other beginer telecope threads. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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newboncntry

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Thank you, Actually i do have trouble finding some here in NJ. I havent even been able to find any astronomy stores, so i cant even really talk to someone in person. I would highly appreciate it if you could send me a link sometime.
 
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datalor

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If you google "astronomy clubs in NJ" you get a lot of hits.<br /> <br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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tfwthom

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On the using the refractor for deep space objects......<br /><br />Aperture rules deep space, you want the scope to grab the most light so you want the largest aperture. With a refractor you get a great view not quite as bright, but clearer<br /><br />You can get a lager aperture in a refractor if you can afford it an 8' Tak is available The FCT-200 Fluorite Apochromatic refractor is the largest Fluorite Apochromatic refractor manufactured by Takahashi©. The FCT-200 features the finest optical elements available in the world today. The front and rear elements employ the highest quality German optical glass and Japanese Fluorite for the center element. All elements are hard multi-coated for maximum light transmission. List Price: $197,000.00<br />Our Price: $167,450.00 You save 15% That even includes the mount.<br /><br />Most (like my 5" Tak) make it a joy to look at the Moon and planets. Watching a transit on Jupiter or just looking at Saturn wows you. (even the public can see the shadow of Saturns rings on the planet) You can crank the power and get right inside a crater without the image breaking down. But when I want to look at deep space I use my old 8" LX90 or look through someones light bucket.<br /><br />Going the other way my TV85 rules open clusters. An RFT allowes you to really see why they call it the Beehive. The Tak or the LX90 will not, in fact I never really liked open clusters till I looked through the 1st RFT. (an old TeleVue Genesis) As long as you want to see a really wide field then an RFT is perfect.<br /><br />Again this whole thing comes down to what you want to do with a scope. Personally I don't like the light buckets if I'm the one that has to haul it around. My ideal set up would be something like a 16" RCX400/LX200 with a 8" Tak piggybacked on it. That will have to wait till I hit the powerball. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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<font color="yellow">an 8' Tak is available </font><br /><br />$200k for an 8 FOOT Tak? I'll take three.<br /><br />Oh - you meant an 8<b>"</b> Tak! <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br />I'll agree with what a lot of the common opinion is.<br /><br />If I want nothing but VISUAL on deep space objects (DSO), a "dobsonian" "light bucket" scope would absolutely be where I'd go in your price range.<br /><br />For photography, I'd buy a small fast Newtonian in your price range, and sink every penny I could into the mount. <br /><br />For planetary, I'd buy the best refractor I could find in that price range. <br /><br />It all depends.<br /><br />SC (I'm not a Mak fan) scopes are great general-purpose. Point at a planet and enjoy. Point at a DSO and enjoy. Don't expect any of them to be jaw-dropping. Do expect it to find anything in the sky. Do expect to do both visual and photographic. Do expect it to be easy to transport, easy to setup, and fast from setup to observation.<br /><br />I really like SC's in general... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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pirated

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if you're going to go with a dobson, might as well get a light bucket....<br />http://www.astronomics.com/main/product.asp/catalog_name/Astronomics/category_name/8WE0S9X6Q9GN8M9M13UX4AW534/product_id/Q12D <br /><br />they have a floor model/slightly used one for $699.<img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>Peace. </p><p><font color="#33cccc">-------------------------------------------------------------------</font> <strong><font color="#993300">I'm a Rock!</font></strong></p><p><font color="#33cccc">Little Johnny was a scientist. Little Johnny is no more. For what he thought was H2O was H2SO4.</font></p> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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The extra money gets you extra optics in CE's example. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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newboncntry

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Thanks for all the good advise, I just have a few more questions. Would I be able to hook up a refractor to an equitorial mount? And does anybody know where i could sell tubes or other parts?
 
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newboncntry

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Oh and another question i forgot to ask, I have my eye on a refractor. Its sold seperatley as just the optical tube, what will i need to hook it up to my equitorial mount, are the tube rings all i need or do i also need something to connect it to the mount?
 
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adrenalynn

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Sure, you put a dovetail in the EQ's head (which you should already have) and then the rings go around the dovetail and the scope's OTA.<br /><br />That's the simplest mounting, it gets more complicated if you want to mount side-by-side tubes or anything funky like that.<br /><br />cloudynights.com is a good place to sell your stuff, and it's free. astromart.com is an even more populated place, but it has a $12 membership fee.<br /><br />What are you looking to sell? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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newboncntry

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Just trying to sell my mak, 127mm, 1540mm. I'm looking to replace it with a 254mm, 1200mm reflector. Trying to get some good views and shots of DSO's
 
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