Ringed planets

  • Thread starter robina_williams
  • Start date
Status
Not open for further replies.
R

robina_williams

Guest
Are there any ringed planets outside the solar system, please?
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
Probably, since there are so many in our solar system that have them, but we don't yet have the ability to image any exoplanets, so can't prove it one way or the other<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
Hi there,<br /><br />I may add that it would be doubtful in any of the 'hot Jupiters' or the 'Hot Neptunes' have <br />any.<br /><br />The solar wind from the parent stars would remove small particals, not to mention<br />these planets, despite their strong gravitational fields, will have very small Hill Spheres, due<br />to the proximity to their parent Suns.<br /><br />So I doubt these will have rings & moons.<br /><br />However, others that orbit further away, absolutely no reason why not.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
R

robina_williams

Guest
Thank you. Roughly how many light years away from earth would 'Hot Jupiters' and 'Hot Neptunes' be likely to be?
 
3

3488

Guest
Coming to mind 51 Pegasi @ 42 light years away from our Solar System.<br /><br />Also try Upsilon Andromedae @ 52 Light years away.<br /><br />How about Tau Bootis @ 51 Light years away?<br /><br />Or 55 Cancri @ 47 Light years away?<br /><br />There is 109 Piscium.<br /><br />Or how about Zeta Leporis, orbited by a monster of an asteroid belt?<br /><br />Try the links above. How close they actually are to reality or how many <br />of these planets really exist is open to considerable<br />doubt, but are based on <br />serious scientific research.<br /><br />I chose those specifically, because all of those stars are visible to the naked eye.<br /><br />Of course planets have been found orbiting stars that are far too faint, but the<br />ones above can be found easily if you know the constellations.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
R

robina_williams

Guest
Thank you so much, Andrew. That's really helpful.
 
3

3488

Guest
You are more than welcome.<br /><br />I have dug a few more out.<br /><br />Mu Arae.<br /><br /> Beta Pictoris.<br /><br /> Iota Draconis. A planet with a Red Giant Sun.<br /><br /> PSR 1257+12. A Pulsar with three planets.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
W

weeman

Guest
Thanks for the interesting links <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> I was not very familiar other solar systems. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
D

dragon04

Guest
Considering that we've discovered many solar systems in the "neighborhood" and that our own solar system contains multiple planets with rings, I think it would be fair to assume that countless planetary systems have ringed planets.<br /><br />Will any of them be as stark and prominent as Saturn's rings? Dunno. Will we find exoplanets closer to their primary than Saturn, or even Jupiter with rings? I'd think so.<br /><br />At one time, and for centuries, we assumed that only one planet in our solar system had rings around it. Pleasantly, we've found that to be not the case.<br /><br />I think ringed planets are probably common.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
R

robina_williams

Guest
That's wonderful -- thanks so much. <br /><br />May I ask now, please, if there is any likelihood that a planet (any planet, ringed or not) might orbit so far from its sun that the sun would not actually be visible from the planet? Or would a sun always be visible to an orbiting planet however far away it is?
 
N

nimbus

Guest
Well, the sky is full of faraway stars' whose planets we can't see. So a more likely case would be for the planet's sun to be dim enough to not be easily discerned from the rest of the stars in the sky.<br /><br />Being so far away from a sun as bright as ours, for example, that it's no different from any other star would probably put the planet under your feet outside of that sun's "ownership", either nearer another star's territory, or in an interstellar void.<br />In either of these last two cases the planet wouldn't orbit the star anymore. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
That's an interesting question. I guess the best way to answer that will be to figure how bright the sun appears from the Oort cloud, our sun's fartest orbiting objects. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
W

weeman

Guest
<font color="yellow"> May I ask now, please, if there is any likelihood that a planet (any planet, ringed or not) might orbit so far from its sun that the sun would not actually be visible from the planet? Or would a sun always be visible to an orbiting planet however far away it is? </font><br /><br />Planets may be so far from their star that it simply appears as a brighter star in the night sky. Pluto has an average distance from the sun of about 40 AU. The sun would be a large bright star in the sky, shining with a magnitude of about -19.00. The sun from Earth has a magnitude of about -26.50. Not a huge difference between the two, but definitely noticable. <br /><br />So, if you venture out even farther beyond Pluto, say to the most distant Kuiper Belt objects (or farther), the sun will appear more and more faint. Sedna exists at a distance that is much, much farther from the sun than Pluto. In fact, it has an average distance of about 70-80 AU. Sedna was discovered in 2003, and has an estimated mean distance of about 8 billion miles from the sun. The sun would be even more faint than it is from Pluto. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
Actually the 7.5 magnitude difference means the sun is 150 times brighter at earth than at Pluto.<br /><br />I'd call that a huge difference.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
You've got some bad distances entered there.<br /><br />the first one is 0.79298 LY which equals 50,114 AU.<br /><br />That would be the Oort Cloud<br /><br />That shows the sun as Mag -3.24, about 4 times dimmer than Venus is right now.<br /><br />The second is 985 AU=0.015 LY, and shows the Sun as Mag -11.8, about as bright as a full moon is from earth.<br /><br />That would be Sedna at aphelion.<br /><br />I think you just got your labels reversed.<br />The first should be Oort Cloud, the second from Sedna at aphelion. (BTW, I have Sedna's aphelion as 907 AU, but new data may have come in to refine the eccentricity. I'll check)<br /><br />So from the Oort cloud, the sun and Alpha Centauri would be of comparable brightness. The sun would still be the brightest object in the sky, though, by a considerabel margin. Nothing else other than Alpha Centauri and Sirius would even be close.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
N

nimbus

Guest
Thanks, I did mix up the tags when I saved the images.<br />Is the magnitude correct? I don't know how to scale Celestia's "magnitude" against the regular +- apparent magnitude, so I set it to 6 thinking it was what our naked eye sees. <br />-Nevermind, I see <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
It seems to give the numbers as apparent and actual magnitude which looks right to me. <br /><br />Why don't you go back and edit the labels, then I'll edit my comments to reflect the change.<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
N

nimbus

Guest
Thanks <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
R

robina_williams

Guest
Well, at that distance, would the sun be seen as a speck in the sky from Sedna? Would it be possible to have a planet orbiting so far from its sun that the sun would appear as just a speck?
 
N

nimbus

Guest
Robina, a sun could only be that dim to its orbiting planet(s) if it were very dim. There are some types of stars that may be dim and massive enough to keep planets in orbit far enough to appear as just a speck in the sky, but I don't know enough to guess for sure..<br /><br />This is what our sun (labeled 'Sol' in the picture) looks like from as far as Sedna orbits. Sedna's on the lower right corner.<br />The farthest known objects known to orbit our sun are known as the Oort cloud, and from that distance, our sun looks like this. <br /><br />So if our sun were both dimmer and more massive (allowing planets to orbit further out than our solar system's do), I think it might only seem like just any other star in the sky. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
R

robina_williams

Guest
Oh, I see. Thank you. And thanks for the links.<br />
 
3

3488

Guest
How about this?<br /><br />Sirius B as seen from Sirius A.<br /><br />Magnitude -13.15.<br /><br />Friday 13th July 2007.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
Post deleted by 3488 <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
Or about this? <br /><br />Proxima Centauri as seen from Alpha Cenauri A. <br /><br />Magnitude +4.63. <br /><br />Note how Aldebaran / Alpha Tauri appears truly embedded within the Hyades. <br /><br />Saturday 14th July 2007. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts