Spacetime Causes Gravity

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xmo1

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>for brevity...&nbsp;what is already known.&nbsp; <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV></p><p>I am&nbsp;thinking about spacetime as having properties similar to an atmosphere or liquid, with properties of displacement, convection&nbsp;currents, viscosity, pressure, and so on. When two sheets or waves of spacetime from two different masses come together or interact they create something similar to surface tensions.</p><p>Seems&nbsp;simplicity is quickly obfuscated by&nbsp;complexity at the slightest meditation.</p><p>Blessed is the person who has both the idea and the math.</p><p>Thanks Derek.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>DenniSys.com</p> </div>
 
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xmo1

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>When you drop the ball on the blanket, what is it about the ball that bends the blanket? If you were in zero gravity, would the blanket be bent by the ball? <br />Posted by SpeedFreek</DIV><br /><br />Interesting post. Zero gravity (the common term) is a misnomer. The&nbsp;strength of gravity becomes less at distance, but still the objects have gravity (sic). Mass bends spacetime. So, yes. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>DenniSys.com</p> </div>
 
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SpeedFreek

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Interesting post. Zero gravity (the common term) is a misnomer. The&nbsp;strength of gravity becomes less at distance, but still the objects have gravity (sic). Mass bends spacetime. So, yes. <br /> Posted by xmo1</DIV></p><p>Doesn't the ball have to exert some sort of <em>force</em> on the blanket, in order to distort it?</p><p>In free-fall, where all objects "fall" at the same rate, would the ball move towards the blanket unless some force pushed it in that direction? </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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xmo1

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Doesn't the ball have to exert some sort of force on the blanket, in order to distort it?In free-fall, where all objects "fall" at the same rate, would the ball move towards the blanket unless some force pushed it in that direction? <br />Posted by SpeedFreek</DIV><br /><br />Pressure? That was asked in the other current post "What is Gravity?"</p><p>Gravity, I think, is defined as an attractive weak force. Is it, or do objects move because of the curves in space-time? </p><p>I don't know, and my brain is becoming numb thinking about it. Guess I'll put it down for awhile. Thanks speedfreak.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>DenniSys.com</p> </div>
 
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SpeedFreek

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Pressure? That was asked in the other current post "What is Gravity?"Gravity, I think, is defined as an attractive weak force. Is it, or do objects move because of the curves in space-time? I don't know, and my brain is becoming numb thinking about it. Guess I'll put it down for awhile. Thanks speedfreak. <br /> Posted by xmo1</DIV></p><p>Sorry, I had no intention of numbing your brain! All I am trying to say is that they are the same thing, but one is "what we observe" and the other is "how we describe our observations mathematically". Just because Einstein's General Theory of Relativity requires that gravitational fields and space-time be one and the same mathematical objects, that doesn't necessarily mean that gravitational fields are mathematical objects in reality...</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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