Strange parallel ridges in Tharsis.

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exoscientist

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<p>&nbsp;I wrote about these before:</p>A new class of Mars gullies.<br />exoscientist<br />asteroid<br />03/10/07 04:47 PM<p>http://uplink.space.com/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=680608</p><p>&nbsp;Below is one of the MGS images showing the ridges in Tharsis:&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/15/ba8eb889-c683-41b3-afd6-e42a6f57c60d.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br /> &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;I'm not sure about the argument I made in that prior post that there are gullies on the ridges. Still I would like to see a Hirise image of the area.</p><p>&nbsp;Here is a Hirise image that shows ridges in Aeolis that might be similar to those in Tharsis:</p><p>&nbsp;<br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/15/15/8f6b47ce-caaa-439e-9fbc-cb7b8b47709e.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br /> </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;The ridges have the look of glacial moraines. There has been evidence of remnant glacial ice in both Tharsis and Aeolis which survives at these near equatorial sites under a dust cover.</p><p>&nbsp;</p>&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob Clark <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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exoscientist

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<p>&nbsp;Here is a diagram showing the parallel trending nature of de Geer moraines and their prevalance in a part of Sweden:</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/3/14/93ca3cfb-e7ea-495e-ae05-c08bdaa0fe9c.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;The de Geer moraines are the ones colored light purple in the diagram.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob Clark<br />&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;<font color="#ff0000">Here is a diagram showing the parallel trending nature of de Geer moraines and their prevalance in a part of Sweden:&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;The de Geer moraines are the ones colored light purple in the diagram.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob Clark&nbsp; <br />Posted by exoscientist</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi Bob,</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Thank you very much for bringing this up again.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I could see the sense of ice in the Tharsis area, though I doubt Arsia Mons itself contains ice.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>This has made me look through my large collection of Tharsis imagery & the higher humidity levels detected by the Viking Orbiters could be either due to Orthographic clouds or perhaps One or more of the Tharsis volcanoes are not entirely extinct & that some venting is still ocurring.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>However I could understand the build up of ice on the Tharsis Bulge, that would make more sense. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Ice & glaciers&nbsp;could easily have formed on that enormous 9 KM high bulge, when Mars was warmer & wetter. Ice certainly could have survived under the accumulation of dust, since Mars became dessicated & lost most of it's atmosphere.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Phoenix assuming a safe landing in Scandia Colles will help with this, if ice is detected in the dust at the landing site.<br /><br />A recent image from Mars Odyssey THEMIS&nbsp;showing lava flows to the south west of Arsia Mons shows a lack of impact craters, suggesting to me, that the area is not totally inactive & that venting is ocurring.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://themis.asu.edu/fullimages/20080411a.jpg</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I hope that the MARSIS on MEX or SHARAD on MRO could ping the Tharsis area to look for subsurface ice.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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exoscientist

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<p> Andrew, I wanted to get a Hirise image of these possible glacial moraines in Tharsis. Since you were able to get Hirise images of Phobos perhaps you could put in the request.</p><p>&nbsp;You mentioned the higher water vapor levels over Tharsis. This could possibly act to replenish the sublimated ice of remnant glaciers, with the sublimation levels reduced by a debris cover.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp; Bob Clark<br />&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Ricardo_Savino

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<p>Hi Exoscientis,</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I&nbsp;coundn&acute;t&nbsp;find&nbsp;the&nbsp;particular&nbsp;image&nbsp;that&nbsp;you&nbsp;want&nbsp;(mostly&nbsp;because&nbsp;I&acute;m&nbsp;kinda&nbsp;low&nbsp;in&nbsp;time&nbsp;by&nbsp;now)&nbsp;but&nbsp;I&nbsp;guess&nbsp;you&nbsp;may&nbsp;find&nbsp;your&nbsp;image&nbsp;in&nbsp;the&nbsp;link&nbsp;below.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;It&acute;s, in my opinion, the best site for MRO High-res images, and I always find wht I&acute;m looking for!</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I&nbsp;really&nbsp;hopes&nbsp;that&nbsp;it&nbsp;help&nbsp;you!</p><p>&nbsp;<strong>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/apotelesmata.php?q=tharsis&order=release_date&submit=Search</strong></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I&nbsp;took&nbsp;the&nbsp;liberty&nbsp;to&nbsp;put&nbsp;the&nbsp;direct&nbsp;link&nbsp;to&nbsp;a&nbsp;tharsis&nbsp;search!</p><p>Cheers!&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#ff0000"><font size="3">Look up and feel small!</font></font></strong> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Hi Exoscientis,&nbsp;I&nbsp;coundn&acute;t&nbsp;find&nbsp;the&nbsp;particular&nbsp;image&nbsp;that&nbsp;you&nbsp;want&nbsp;(mostly&nbsp;because&nbsp;I&acute;m&nbsp;kinda&nbsp;low&nbsp;in&nbsp;time&nbsp;by&nbsp;now)&nbsp;but&nbsp;I&nbsp;guess&nbsp;you&nbsp;may&nbsp;find&nbsp;your&nbsp;image&nbsp;in&nbsp;the&nbsp;link&nbsp;below.&nbsp;&nbsp;It&acute;s, in my opinion, the best site for MRO High-res images, and I always find wht I&acute;m looking for!&nbsp;I&nbsp;really&nbsp;hopes&nbsp;that&nbsp;it&nbsp;help&nbsp;you!&nbsp;http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/apotelesmata.php?q=tharsis&order=release_date&submit=Search&nbsp;I&nbsp;took&nbsp;the&nbsp;liberty&nbsp;to&nbsp;put&nbsp;the&nbsp;direct&nbsp;link&nbsp;to&nbsp;a&nbsp;tharsis&nbsp;search!Cheers!&nbsp; <br />Posted by Ricardo_Savino</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi Ricardo_Savino,</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>&nbsp;Thank you very much for your input & help with this. You have saved me a lot of time, as I was going to do likewise. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Instead I can now concentrate on specifics. Fantastic search you did there. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-cool.gif" border="0" alt="Cool" title="Cool" /></strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>&nbsp;Hi Bob, no problem. I had already requested a major HiRISE imaging campaign of the&nbsp;Tharsis area, but I will make a more specific request on your behalf. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Phobos & Deimos where just part of my request. Polar imaging & possible evidence of active volcanism was also included.&nbsp;<br /></strong></font></p><font size="2" color="#000000"><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I found this HiRISE of a possible glacial feature on Arsia Mons (not IN Arsia Mons BTW)</strong></font></font><font size="2" color="#000000"> <p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_002922_1725</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/12/6/bc373b71-bf89-4271-8647-9d5ed9afdfed.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Channels on South East Arsia Mons.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_005981_1695</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/2/12/c2c42c24-3c13-42fe-bcf5-fef98a5fc08f.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><strong>I am off out now, but will be back later to continue the HiRISE search.</strong></p><p><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></p></font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Ricardo_Savino

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi Ricardo_Savino,&nbsp;Thank you very much for your input & help with this. You have saved me a lot of time, as I was going to do likewise. Instead I can now concentrate on specifics. Fantastic search you did there. &nbsp;</DIV><br />Hi 3488!</p><p>Always&nbsp;a&nbsp;pleasure&nbsp;to&nbsp;help&nbsp;you&nbsp;guys&nbsp;out&nbsp;here&nbsp;in&nbsp;what&nbsp;I&nbsp;can.&nbsp;I&acute;m&nbsp;not&nbsp;a&nbsp;professional&nbsp;in&nbsp;the&nbsp;area,&nbsp;but&nbsp;I&acute;m&nbsp;kinda&nbsp;crazy&nbsp;about&nbsp;the&nbsp;subject&nbsp;and&nbsp;always&nbsp;spend&nbsp;a&nbsp;lot&nbsp;of&nbsp;time&nbsp;making&nbsp;researchs&nbsp;and&nbsp;looking&nbsp;for&nbsp;high-res&nbsp;images.</p><p>I&acute;m&nbsp;very&nbsp;glad&nbsp;that&nbsp;you&nbsp;like!!!</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Cheers!&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#ff0000"><font size="3">Look up and feel small!</font></font></strong> </div>
 
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tom_hobbes

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>3488</DIV></p><p>You couldn't suggest a graphics tool that I can use to open the mega hi res HiRISE images could you? I've tried various plugins for photoshop (including photoshops own for j2k) and various standalone packages, but they all refuse to open the J2k jpegs at full res. It's pissing me off! Why are the full size images only available in a format you cannot open at full size?</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Jay.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#339966"> I wish I could remember<br /> But my selective memory<br /> Won't let me</font><font size="2" color="#99cc00"> </font><font size="3" color="#339966"><font size="2">- </font></font><font size="1" color="#339966">Mark Oliver Everett</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
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nimbus

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>You couldn't suggest a graphics tool that I can use to open the mega hi res HiRISE images could you? I've tried various plugins for photoshop (including photoshops own for j2k) and various standalone packages, but they all refuse to open the J2k jpegs at full res. It's pissing me off! Why are the full size images only available in a format you cannot open at full size?&nbsp;Jay.&nbsp; <br /> Posted by tom_hobbes</DIV>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/tools/ ?<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;I wrote about these before:A new class of Mars gullies.exoscientistasteroid03/10/07 04:47 PMhttp://uplink.space.com/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=680608Below is one of the MGS images showing the ridges in Tharsis:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;I'm not sure about the argument I made in that prior post that there are gullies on the ridges. Still I would like to see a Hirise image of the area.&nbsp;Here is a Hirise image that shows ridges in Aeolis that might be similar to those in Tharsis:&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;The ridges have the look of glacial moraines. There has been evidence of remnant glacial ice in both Tharsis and Aeolis which survives at these near equatorial sites under a dust cover.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob Clark <br /> Posted by exoscientist</DIV></p><p>Glacial moraines?&nbsp; Oh, that is a cool idea!&nbsp; Living *on* a moraine, I find that particularly interesting.&nbsp; ;-)&nbsp; We're just at the edge of the Driftless Area, where the ancient glaciers did not go, and so the Twin Cities is full of gravel from terminal moraines.&nbsp; In places, that is.&nbsp; You will get a bit misled if you read the Wikipedia article on the subject, as it treats the term "Twin Cities" a bit erratically.&nbsp; For instance, it says that Fort Snelling is downriver of Minneapolis-St Paul.&nbsp; It's actually *between* Minneapolis and St Paul, at least as far as the Mississippi is concerned, and the geology of the two cities is dramatically different despite bordering one another. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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exoscientist

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi Exoscientis,&nbsp;I&nbsp;coundn&acute;t&nbsp;find&nbsp;the&nbsp;particular&nbsp;image&nbsp;that&nbsp;you&nbsp;want&nbsp;(mostly&nbsp;because&nbsp;I&acute;m&nbsp;kinda&nbsp;low&nbsp;in&nbsp;time&nbsp;by&nbsp;now)&nbsp;but&nbsp;I&nbsp;guess&nbsp;you&nbsp;may&nbsp;find&nbsp;your&nbsp;image&nbsp;in&nbsp;the&nbsp;link&nbsp;below.&nbsp;&nbsp;It&acute;s, in my opinion, the best site for MRO High-res images, and I always find wht I&acute;m looking for!&nbsp;I&nbsp;really&nbsp;hopes&nbsp;that&nbsp;it&nbsp;help&nbsp;you!&nbsp;http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/apotelesmata.php?q=tharsis&order=release_date&submit=Search&nbsp;I&nbsp;took&nbsp;the&nbsp;liberty&nbsp;to&nbsp;put&nbsp;the&nbsp;direct&nbsp;link&nbsp;to&nbsp;a&nbsp;tharsis&nbsp;search!Cheers!&nbsp; <br />Posted by Ricardo_Savino</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;Thanks for the link to that list of images. This might be&nbsp;an example of them:</p><p>&nbsp;<span class="captionmaintitle">Sample Lava Plains in South Tharsis Region (PSP_005638_1635)</span><br />http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_005638_1635</p><p>&nbsp;Though they are denser than the fields of moraines seen on Earth.<br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/14/ea2e4c16-f29c-4977-bed8-7bc27e7c7522.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p>&nbsp; The online&nbsp;option of the&nbsp;IAS Viewer doesn't seem to be working (where you don't have to download the entire image) and my computer is low on disk space to download the full resolution versions of these images.</p><p>&nbsp;Could someone post crops of the highest resolution versions of this image and of the Hirise image showing the ridges in Aeolis?</p><p>&nbsp; Bob Clark</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp; </p><p><br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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