The moon is 85 million years younger than previously thought

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Some discussion on this topic already too in the forums, see https://forums.space.com/threads/earths-moon-had-a-magma-ocean-for-200-million-years.32361/

This new space.com article says "While scientists have previously thought that this moon-forming collision happened 4.51 billion years ago, the new work pegged the moon's birth at only 4.425 billion years ago."

The age for the origin of the solar system is established by the meteorite radiometric ages assigned, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NatGe...3..637B/abstract, "The age of the Solar System can be defined as the time of formation of the first solid grains in the nebular disc surrounding the proto-Sun. This age is estimated by dating calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions in meteorites. These inclusions are considered as the earliest formed solids in the solar nebula. Their formation marks the beginning for several long- and short-lived radiogenic clocks that are used to precisely define the timescales of Solar System events, such as the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Here we present the 207Pb-206Pb isotope systematics in a calcium-aluminium-rich inclusion from the Northwest Africa 2364 CV3-group chondritic meteorite, which indicate that the inclusion formed 4,568.2million years ago."

So this new age for the origin of the Moon is 1.43E+8 years later (the lunar magma ocean involved too), after the date assigned to the origin of the solar system, 4.568E+9 years old. It is important to reconcile various ages obtained from different samples, including lunar zircons and Earth zircons like the Jack Hills dated 4.375E+9 years old or 4.39E+9 years old.
 

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