The SLS Chain

Mar 17, 2020
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As everyone knows, any chain is only as strong as its weakest link. To avoid a catastrophic failure on its launch hopefully by November, everything below must work. In addition, there may be other items that are not listed:

1. The first stage must have limited hydrogen leaks or doesn't explode on ascent.
2. The solid rocket boosters stacking and O rings don't fail.
3. Weather is OK.
4. The ride around moon goes as planned. I don't feel there is a problem here.
5. The capsule decent in the atmosphere occurs cleanly without burning up. The plan is to go faster than ever and has its risks.
6. Aren't there other components on the SLS and Artemis sitting on the lauchpad for so long that are past their lifetimes of procurement? I don't have the list.

Of cause, we still have the billion dollar costs and the lack of reusability on each flight that the politicians don't care.

Let's see what happens.
 
Last edited:
Jan 29, 2020
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SpaceX has figured out mass production principles that Boeing doesn't use for space. It is hard to judge when there is enough a market to mass produce something for space or in space. Artemis will eventually make terrariums for space. Without enough tourists or operation man-hrs to justify mass production the app isn't needed for an entity with scalable production processes. I figure birds need .6g or exercise equipment, so I'd put a vet nano-hub in BC where SpaceX isn't. Ethane and vents are enough to make insects that may be made to have a golden ant food consistency. I'd put this app in Washington where SpaceX is.
Governments are okay losing 1/20 missions, often to meteors or radiation. Companies, 1/5. I've read a 1980 encyclopedia that has Musk's fields except Neurolink. I envision a 1m x 2m corundum block where Webb is with sensors, to catch micro-meteorites. I'd detach 1/2 the block for NY State and 1/2 for Quebec to analyze. SpaceX may have made the transportation cost 5x cheaper, but no one worries about the risk or researches nanoparticles. I guess there had to be a nanoparticle precursor book in S.Africa in 1980 and then more applications would be dreamed up with the meteor risk diminished. I'm guessing because of AIDS youth no one from South Africa will ever do public biology R+D like the yeast Artemis is hopefully taking up. In general, rocket launch sites are far away from biodiversity that breeds biosentinel R+D.
 

COLGeek

Moderator
Apr 3, 2020
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I guess there had to be a nanoparticle precursor book in S.Africa in 1980 and then more applications would be dreamed up with the meteor risk diminished. I'm guessing because of AIDS youth no one from South Africa will ever do public biology R+D like the yeast Artemis is hopefully taking up. In general, rocket launch sites are far away from biodiversity that breeds biosentinel R+D.
What does this have to do with the thread topic? Please elaborate.
 
Jan 29, 2020
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People in pandemic ravaged areas will not study biology or public health. I'm guessing space bio research is worth doing where there is biodiversity of relatively colder species. The mission launches yeast radiation research. The thread was about why SpaceX doesn't do the research. Enough applications and maybe Musk would do Starliner if Cis-Lunar scales, but never bio. Just like I only know sounding rockets now for folding emergency comm gliders.
 

COLGeek

Moderator
Apr 3, 2020
1,178
686
3,060
People in pandemic ravaged areas will not study biology or public health. I'm guessing space bio research is worth doing where there is biodiversity of relatively colder species. The mission launches yeast radiation research. The thread was about why SpaceX doesn't do the research. Enough applications and maybe Musk would do Starliner if Cis-Lunar scales, but never bio. Just like I only know sounding rockets now for folding emergency comm gliders.
Seems a broad generalization, and without sources to back up position, not to be taken too seriously.

Lets try to stick to the actual topics, or if broadening the perspective, offer sources to substantiate your position.

Thank you.
 
Jan 29, 2020
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They didn't have enough doctors in S.Africa in the early '90s. So they definitely didn't have enough clinical researchers. I got to live in a good hospital twice. There were medical textbooks being thrown out in the summer leftovers. My dad had to have a half dozen books on his shelf, diagnosis and so forth. The hospital was safe from drones, made its own oxygen, and had both the virology lab, an MRI manufacturer, and Apotax in its courier runs daily. I got to learn what a Code Blue was (plane crash), and the warehouse layout. I got Drug books and microfluidics books for a quarter when I was broke. Probably this bored Musk with his rocket pipeline somehow but Frank Plummer's daughter as a school aquaintence by a jr high school friend was considered his badge of honour. He was the leading AIDs researcher.
 

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