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Tiny galaxy

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alokmohan

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tiny galaxy, nearly halfway across the universe, the smallest in size and mass known to exist at that distance, has been identified by an international team of scientists led by two from the University of California, Santa Barbara.<br /><br />The scientists used data collected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. This galaxy is about half the size, and approximately one-tenth the "weight" of the smallest distant galaxies typically observed, and it is 100 times lighter than our own Milky Way.<br /><br />The findings will be published in the December 20, 2007 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. <br /><br />"Even though this galaxy is more than six billion light years away, the reconstructed image is as sharp as the ordinary ground-based images of the nearest structure of galaxies, the Virgo cluster, which is 100 times closer to us," said lead author Phil Marshall, a postdoctoral fellow at UC Santa Barbara.<br />tiny galaxy, nearly halfway across the universe, the smallest in size and mass known to exist at that distance, has been identified by an international team of scientists led by two from the University of California, Santa Barbara.<br /><br />The scientists used data collected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. This galaxy is about half the size, and approximately one-tenth the "weight" of the smallest distant galaxies typically observed, and it is 100 times lighter than our own Milky Way.<br /><br />The findings will be published in the December 20, 2007 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. <br /><br />"Even though this galaxy is more than six billion light years away, the reconstructed image is as sharp as the ordinary ground-based images of the nearest structure of galaxies, the Virgo cluster, which is 100 times closer to us," said lead author Phil Marshall, a postdoctoral fellow at UC Santa Barbara.<br />tiny galaxy, nearly halfway across the universe, the smallest in size and mass known to exis
 
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MeteorWayne

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Thanx. Thanx. Thanx. Thanx. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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ashish27

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My kinda galaxy. I need to find a nice planet there to settle. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
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h2ouniverse

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The advantage is that there is no need to be in co-rotation zone to avoid crossing gas-rich arms: there are no arms!<br />On the other hand, the metallicity may be low. An issue...
 
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alokmohan

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How much time may require to shift bengalees to asish27 planet?
 
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synical

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I'm very new at astronomy, so correct me if I'm wrong!<br /><br />6 billion light years away = the galaxy we are seeing is how it was 6 billion years ago (follow me? =P)<br /><br />So in 6 billion years, how much bigger could this galaxy have got? Have they been able to discern any near by clusters or other small galaxies that it could have absorbed in 6 billion years?<br /><br />I'm just curious to know, because I've heard some people say that galaxies can sometimes 'assimilate' rogue star clusters.
 
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ashish27

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the only way to find that is to run a computer simulation program and input as much info possible into that simulator program.
 
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5stone10

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They didn't mention the estimated size.<br /><br />100x less dense than the Milky Way - so that would be 1,000-2,000 light years in width ?
 
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nexium

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My guess is permanent absorbtion is rare. If two galaxies approach each other, and collide at a speed of 0.03 c: They typically exit each other at 0.02 c after a few million years of merger. Exception would be a dead on impact where the nucleus of the galaxies collide. Stars are typically so far apart very little deceleration occurs which is typically off set by gravity assist manuvers = sling shot manuvers of individual stars. Even when nuclii collide at 0.01c, some of the stars will escape the merger, so it seems to me.<br />Likely we will find more tiny galaxies even farther from Earth, if we do a serious search. Neil
 
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