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Two novice questions about everything in the Universe!

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falkor

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A) Does it have mass?<br />B) What is it made of? <br /><br /><b>Matter</b><br />A) Yes<br />B) Atoms<br /><br /><b>Energy</b><br />A) ?<br />B) ?<br /><br /><b>Light</b><br />A) ?<br />B) Photons (particle)<br /><br /><b>Radiation (same as light?)</b><br />A) ?<br />B) Photons (particle)<br /><br /><b>Sound</b><br />A) ?<br />B) ?<br /><br /><b>Gravity</b><br />A) No<br />B) Gravitons (particle)<br /><br /><b>Electricity</b><br />A) ?<br />B) ?<br /><br /><b>Magnetism</b><br />A) ?<br />B) ?<br /><br /><b>Strong Nuclear Force</b><br />A) ?<br />B) ?<br /><br /><b>Weak Nuclear Force</b><br />A) ?<br />B) ?<br /><br /><b>Atoms</b><br />A) Yes<br />B) Protons, Neutrons, Electrons (particles)<br /><br /><b>Particles</b><br />A) ?<br />B) Quarks<br /><br />Is this correct so far? Are all particles made of quarks? Please can you fill in any missing gaps? What other things have I missed out that makes up the known universe? Can you give any examples? Any help would be much appreciated!
 
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heyscottie

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I have <b>bolded</b> my additions...<br /><br />A) Does it have mass? <br />B) What is it made of? <br /><br />Matter <br />A) Yes <br />B) Atoms <br /><br />Energy <br />A) ? <br />B) ? <br /><br />Light <br />A) <b>No, but it does have momentum.</b><br />B) Photons (particle) <br /><br />Radiation (same as light?) <br />A) <b>Same as light</b><br />B) Photons (particle) <br /><br />Sound <br />A) No<br />B) <b>Sound is just a pressure wave caused by atoms bumping against each other. Physicist find the concept of a <i>phonon</i> useful to indicate the particle nature of a sound wave. But note that phonons are only theoretical constructs, and are not directly observed.</b><br /><br />Gravity <br />A) No <br />B) Gravitons (particle) <br /><br />Electricity <br />A) <b>No</b><br />B) <b>Electromagnetic waves, or photons</b><br /><br />Magnetism <br />A) <b>No</b><br />B) <b>Electromagnetic waves, or photons</b><br /><br />Strong Nuclear Force <br />A) <b>Gluons do not have mass</b><br />B) <b>The force mediating particle is the gluon</b> <br /><br />Weak Nuclear Force <br />A) <b> W and Z bosons have mass</b><br />B) <b>The force mediating particles are W and Z bosons</b><br /><br />Atoms <br />A) Yes <br />B) Protons, Neutrons, Electrons (particles) <br /><br />Particles <br />A) <b>Some yes, some no</b> <br />B) Quarks, <b>leptons, and force mediating bosons are all the elementary particles predicted to exist in the Standard Model</b><br />
 
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jgreimer

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Matter <br />A) Yes <br />B) Atoms - Ultimately quarks<br /><br />Energy <br />A) Yes, mass = E/c^2<br />B) ? <br /><br />A) No <br />B) Gravitons (particle) or warped spacetime<br /><br />Electricity <br />A) Yes <br />B) Electrons
 
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falkor

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Light <br />A) No, but it does have momentum.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />Is Momentum the speed at which the photons are travelling? <br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Sound <br />A) No <br />B) Sound is just a pressure wave caused by atoms bumping against each other. Physicist find the concept of a phonon useful to indicate the particle nature of a sound wave. But note that phonons are only theoretical constructs, and are not directly observed.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />So sound cannot be heard in space/vaccum and we only hear it because of vibrating air after the "soundwaves" have spread from the source?<br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Electricity <br />A) No <br />B) Electromagnetic waves, or photons <br /><br />Magnetism <br />A) No <br />B) Electromagnetic waves, or photons <p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />I heard that things can behave as waves or particles. Isn't Electromagnetic Radiation the right answer?<br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Energy <br />A) Yes, mass = E/c^2 <br />B) ?<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />Einstein's equation only explains how much mass can be converted from energy, but doesn't mean it has mass when in the energy form. So energy doesn't appear to have any mass, otherwise Einstein would be describing how to convert one type of mass to another type of mass.<br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>A) No <br />B) Gravitons (particle) or warped spacetime<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />How bizarre! I'm wondering if Gravity works more like how Newton proposed? Maybe Einstein's accurate equations could really describe a different model? How does warped space-time keep us on the ground?<br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Electricity <br />A) Yes <br />B) Electrons<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />Ah, now you've confused me!
 
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falkor

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Electricity <br />A) Yes <br />B) Electrons<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />Apparently, Electrons round the edge of matter does the job of Magnetism! <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> Once Photons have left an object then they must carry the Electricity/Radiation? Electromagnetic Radiation (including light) certainly has no Neutrons or Protons, but do Photons carry Electrons with them? Or are Electrons converted into Photons? I read something about this under the subject of Plancks' Constant. Quantum Mechanics is so damn confusing--and that's without all weirdness attached to it!
 
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