Up down

Wolfshadw

Moderator
Apr 1, 2020
244
165
260
Up, down, and sides are all relative to the observers position. A person looking into the sky in the Northern Hemisphere of the planet can be considered, "looking up". It is no different for a person in the Southern Hemisphere of the planet, looking in the exact opposite direction. If the person in the Northern Hemisphere is "looking up", do you consider the person in the Southern Hemisphere (also looking to the sky) "looking down"?

-Wolf sends
 
Jan 9, 2021
1
0
10
While traveling through space, is there an up or down or side-to-side to the universe?
Simply put, "Down" will always be the direction that has the greatest gravitational pull. When that is not immediately apparent, then down is observational and opinionative based on the individual. Overall it would be irrelevant in space and not used as directional guidance other than to discern the difference between the ceiling and the floor (if these are defined).
 
Simply put, "Down" will always be the direction that has the greatest gravitational pull. When that is not immediately apparent, then down is observational and opinionative based on the individual. Overall it would be irrelevant in space and not used as directional guidance other than to discern the difference between the ceiling and the floor (if these are defined).
"Simply put, "Down" will always be the direction that has the greatest gravitational pull. "
What if there were no gravitational pull, or 7 nearly equal ones at various orientations, or two or more changing relative effects rapidly s you progressed in however you define your movement?
I think defining "down" relative to your "spaceship" is the only answer, but just call it y = negative.
Cat :)
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

Latest posts