Whichis the heaviest object in the universe ?

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atlantisworp

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DrRocket":36rf83bh said:
atlantisworp":36rf83bh said:
If all planets and stars circle around the heaviest object, their must, somewhere, be the one, as center of the universe, where is it dear fellows Americans?

There is one answer.

Cosmologists typically assume that the universe is, on the largest scales homogeneous and isotropic. It is that assumption, and consequences of it that permit a notion of global "time" and global "space" to be developed in a model based on general relativity.

With that approximation the center is the location of the original Big Bang. And the answer to that is that it is right here in my office. Right at the point of the "I" on my keyboard. No kidding that is correct. That is the point.

Of course every other point in the entire universe is also the point of origin. Everywhere is the center.

Refer to the balloon analogy for further enlightenment.
I have to disagree with you as the matter we are now is not know where it was before some billons behind
 
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atlantisworp

Guest
SpeedFreek":1p9vgjle said:
I wasn't using it precisely either, of course. To me, in the context of this thread, it means that smaller things don't travel in circles around larger things, or sit still for very long! ;)

I don't like the term chaotic either, especially when applied to the dynamics of the universe, as it implies a lack of order. The universe doesn't lack order, it just seems to have a very complicated kind of order (in the context of gravity, at least)!
I like that, you must be as ignorant as me, because I’m able to understand you?
 
D

DrRocket

Guest
atlantisworp":3aq2tn7c said:
DrRocket":3aq2tn7c said:
atlantisworp":3aq2tn7c said:
If all planets and stars circle around the heaviest object, their must, somewhere, be the one, as center of the universe, where is it dear fellows Americans?

There is one answer.

Cosmologists typically assume that the universe is, on the largest scales homogeneous and isotropic. It is that assumption, and consequences of it that permit a notion of global "time" and global "space" to be developed in a model based on general relativity.

With that approximation the center is the location of the original Big Bang. And the answer to that is that it is right here in my office. Right at the point of the "I" on my keyboard. No kidding that is correct. That is the point.

Of course every other point in the entire universe is also the point of origin. Everywhere is the center.

Refer to the balloon analogy for further enlightenment.
I have to disagree with you as the matter we are now is not know where it was before some billons behind
What does that have to do with anything ?
 
M

Mee_n_Mac

Guest
DrRocket":337s3ykb said:
atlantisworp":337s3ykb said:
DrRocket":337s3ykb said:
There is one answer.

Cosmologists typically assume that the universe is, on the largest scales homogeneous and isotropic. It is that assumption, and consequences of it that permit a notion of global "time" and global "space" to be developed in a model based on general relativity.

With that approximation the center is the location of the original Big Bang. And the answer to that is that it is right here in my office. Right at the point of the "I" on my keyboard. No kidding that is correct. That is the point.

Of course every other point in the entire universe is also the point of origin. Everywhere is the center.

Refer to the balloon analogy for further enlightenment.
I have to disagree with you as the matter we are now is not know where it was before some billons behind
What does that have to do with anything ?
Check the banned user list and you'll see 'AW' is no longer with us.
 
D

dragon04

Guest
atlantisworp":jti9e3hg said:
If all planets and stars circle around the heaviest object, their must, somewhere, be the one, as center of the universe, where is it dear fellows Americans?
First, it wouldn't be the "Heaviest" object. It would be the most massive one. Second, there are well-defined limits on how massive any individual object can be before it can't exist. in the case of stars, which are the most massive single objects possible, somewhere between 120 and 150 Sun masses are as "big" as a star can get.

Considering that there are a theorized 125 billion galaxies in the Cosmos, we have no hope of defining THE most massive single object in the Universe.

HD269810 is a supergiant blue star in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A "satellite galaxy" to our own Milky way. It is 150 times the mass of our own Sun.

The most massive (or "heaviest") object known might be the central massive black hole at the heart of the quasar QJ287 about 3.5 billion Light Years away. Its estimated mass is 18 BILLION of our Suns. The BH at the center of our own Galaxy is estimated at about 4.3 million of our Suns by way of comparison.

Even a modestly sized Neutron Star of only a couple times the mass of our Sun is staggering. A teaspoon full of matter from such a star would weigh as much as Mount Everest.
 
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a_lost_packet_

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atlantisworp":2h68vyxx said:
Which is the heaviest object in the universe ?
The one that is accelerating at the greatest rate.
 
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