2008 Lyrid Meteor Shower-April 22

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MeteorWayne

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From this month's NAMN (North American Meteor Network) Notes <br />It is written for north america; if anyone else is interested, tell me where you are and I'll give some local advice.<br /><br />If you are interested in collecting scientifically useful meteor data, see the NAMN (particularly useful for beginners):<br />http://www.namnmeteors.org/<br /><br />or the International Meteor Organization:<br />http://www.imo.net/<br /><br />Meteor Wayne<br /><br />1. Challenging Lyrids for 2008...<br /><br />The moon is in about the worst possible position for this year&rsquo;s Lyrids.<br />So it will be a challenge to collect quality data. I hope to be able to<br />help you get the most out of whatever time you can contribute.<br /><br />First, the bad news. The moon is full on April 20th, only a day and a<br />half before the Lyrid peak. This means the 97% illuminated moon will be<br />rising in the ESE at about the same time the Lyrid radiant is rising in<br />the northeast. They will only be separated by about 75 degrees. So it<br />will be a battle all night long.<br /><br />The International Meteor Organization (IMO) predicts the peak will occur<br />between 21h UT on the 21st and 08h UT on the 22nd. Based on last years<br />peak (IMO ZHR 21 +/-3 at Solar Longitude 32.34) this would be the 08h UT<br />time on the 22nd. In addition, last year, two North American observers<br />detected a short possible second peak (EZHR 34 +/- 13) at Solar<br />Longitude 32.63; this would be about 1230h UT on the 22nd this year.<br />Some far western US sites might be able to see this, should it return,<br />as well as Hawaiian locations.<br /><br />So how do we get the most out of these circumstances?<br /><br />First, hope for very clear and dry weather. Even a small bit of haze in<br />the air can be devastating with a full moon. Second, you must find a way<br />to block the moon, and place it behind you as much as possible. The good<br />news (yes a tiny bit of good news) is that the moon rides fairly low<br />across the sky this night. It only reaches an elevation of 25 degrees at<br />41 N, only 35 degrees at 30 N at transit ~ 2 AM daylight time. So you<br />should be able to block it. You can use a building, a car, or even a<br />beach umbrella, but hide that thing!<br /><br />Unfortunately, since the separation between moon and radiant is only 75<br />degrees, you don&rsquo;t want to look too near the radiant; place your field<br />of view on the other side. A field centered between Draco&rsquo;s head and the<br />bowl of the little dipper is about 40 degrees from the radiant, but<br />nearly 120 degrees from the moon. That&rsquo;s the best advice I can give.<br />Good luck to all.<br /><br />Lyrids (LYR) Meteor Velocity: 49 km/sec (medium fast)<br />Start of Activity - April 15: Radiant RA 263 (17:32), Dec +34<br />Peak of Activity - April 22: Radiant RA 271 (18:04), Dec +34<br />End of Activity - April 25: Radiant RA 274 (18:16), Dec +34<br /><br />For radiant positions and more detailed descriptions of showers, see the<br />IMO 2008 Meteor Shower Calendar at: http://www.imo.net/calendar/2008<br /><br />MW<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p>Wanted to bump the thread since activity should have started. I was planning to observe last night despite the moon, but some thin cirrus were overhead, well illuminated by the moon.<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-cry.gif" border="0" alt="Cry" title="Cry" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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aphh

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I spent two hours outside, but only detected 1 meteor that seemed to be originating from the target radiant. Moon is only 16 degrees above the horizon but unfortunately clouds entered from the east and the view is blocked now.
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I spent two hours outside, but only detected 1 meteor that seemed to be originating from the target radiant. Moon is only 16 degrees above the horizon but unfortunately clouds entered from the east and the view is blocked now. <br />Posted by aphh</DIV></p><p>Wait, so what would be the best time (peak) for EST? Good luck pplz :)</p>
 
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aphh

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Wait, so what would be the best time (peak) for EST? Good luck pplz :) <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>If I'm right the best time is now or just about to start. I'm going to go outside once more in awhile to see if the clouds have passed.&nbsp;</p>
 
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aphh

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Clouds had passed, but I have nothing to report. Besides a truly fantastic moonset.<br />
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Wait, so what would be the best time (peak) for EST? Good luck pplz :) <br />Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV><br /><br />From the original post:</p><p>"The International Meteor Organization (IMO) predicts the peak will occur<br />between 21h UT on the 21st and 08h UT on the 22nd. Based on last years<br />peak (IMO ZHR 21 +/-3 at Solar Longitude 32.34) this would be the 08h UT<br />time on the 22nd. In addition, last year, two North American observers<br />detected a short possible second peak (EZHR 34 +/- 13) at Solar<br />Longitude 32.63; this would be about 1230h UT on the 22nd this year.<br />Some far western US sites might be able to see this, should it return,<br />as well as Hawaiian locations."</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I spent two hours outside, but only detected 1 meteor that seemed to be originating from the target radiant. Moon is only 16 degrees above the horizon but unfortunately clouds entered from the east and the view is blocked now. <br />Posted by aphh</DIV><br /><br />I was out for the last 2 hours before morning twilight.</p><p>Sky was not dry-clear, rather a touch hazy so Limiting MAgnitude wasn't very good.</p><p>Still I saw 8 Lyrids and 1 sporadic in the first hour, only 1 Lyrid and 2 sporadics in the second&nbsp;in the second.</p><p>Weather permitting, I'll try again tonight.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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