5.75 Inch Galileo scope

Status
Not open for further replies.
M

marslauncher

Guest
Hi, I have a 5.75 Inch scope, <br /><br />fs - 120<br />f 1000 * 120<br /><br />I have 2 eye pieces, a 25mm and a variable zoom lens which goes from f 6.8mm to f 16mm<br /><br />I also have a 1.5x Erecting Lens<br />and a 3x Astroscopic Barlow Lens.<br /><br />I was wondering what the maximum possible Magnification I can get with this scope and also what Eyepieces should I get, <br /><br />The second part of my question is that I have been taking photos with my scope through the eyepiece by holding my digital camera up but I have not mastered how to use the Mars Eye Finderscope, any tips on how to set that up? once I can get that to work properly I will be able to fully use the camera mount I made for the scope, also I am trying to find designs for making the scope motorised without spending a lot of money? any tips?<br /><br />thanks<br /><br />heres the pic of saturn I took with just the basic setup, find saturn, add barlow and 25mm eye piece and hold camera up.<br />John<br />
 
N

nevers

Guest
Hi John, <br /><br />The general rule is 50x per sqaure inch. So, you should be able to push around 287x with your 'scope.<br /><br />I don't know much about your 'scope or mount. Is it the one that is sold by Apogee? Refractor or Reflector?<br /><br />Anyway, taking pictures. Something you said does not go hand in hand. "I have been taking photos...trying to find designs...without spending a lot of money". Your in the same boat I'm in: trying to get the most out of the least.<br /><br />I'm not sure how the issue with your finderscope is hindering your picture taking. Yes, you do need some kind of device to hold the camera to the eyepiece. And yes, you will need some sort of motorized mount to take better pictures. Maybe if you posted a picture of your set-up we could offer better answers.
 
N

nevers

Guest
Here, I found a picture that I took of Saturn with my 5" Meade Refractor. To give you an idea of how much it will cost (I'm sure others have done better with less), this picture cost me about $1600.
 
M

marslauncher

Guest
Here is the pic of my telescope, it is without the counterweight legs.
 
M

marslauncher

Guest
well for 1600, I would probably buy myself a fully motorised Telescope, a T adapter and a better camera plus even a CCD camera to boot hehe. I am waiting for my work permit so I cant work at the moment and was looking for a cheap project to boost my capabilities at the moment, i know I need to get some better eyepieces, but until then I was trying to find out how I could make an Equatorial mount for my scope, as well as callibrate the Mars Eye Finder.
 
N

nevers

Guest
Hi John - <br /><br />Yes, that's what I've done: the picture came out of a 5" achromat refractor on a "GoTo" mount with dual axis control, a Canon Powershot G5 digital camera, and an Orion SteadyPix camera mount. Plus there's the eyepiece (a cheap one from Orion), the software sacking program, a lot of trial-and-error experimenting and time. I've seen CCD camera's going from $300 or so but the real ones are at least $3000. There is the "webcam" option too which is a lot less. (You get what you pay for. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> ) But the most important thing in taking pictures is the mount and how well you are able to Polar Align your 'scope.<br /><br />I found something really cheap you may want to look at and it doesn't look like that bad of a set-up. The 'scope is a little smaller then your current one but it comes with a complete set-up: minus the camera and camera mount. It looks like a fairly decent set-up for the cost. Here's the link: Meade Digital Goto Scope from Apogee . Scroll down, it's the 3rd advertisement.<br /><br />I'm still unclear about the Mars Eye. Are you trying to align it with the 'scope? If so, it's best to do it on a terrestial object: light a distant street light or maybe a mountain peak and during the daylight or early evening. Find an object and center it in your eyepiece, then use the adjustments on the Mars Eye to move the dot into the object. This will align the two pretty close and you can zero in using Polaris when it get's darker. Anyway, if it's something else please explain and maybe somebody else can help better.<br /><br />Good luck on your permit and keep us posted.
 
N

nevers

Guest
Hey Crazy - <br /><br />I was wondering where you were. That's a great link - I never heard of such a mount: very interesting.
 
H

heyo

Guest
That's the exact same telescope I have.<br /><br />Great little scope for the price.... rings of Saturn.. great red spot on Jupiter... the whole nine, great for the back yard. I love mine. Got me started to really want to get into to amateur 'stronomy.<br /><br />Heyo
 
N

nevers

Guest
Hello - <br /><br />I'm just wondering - was that some kind of secret code? Am I missing something? Anybody, anyone......anybody...Buhler?<br /><br />Oh, by the way - I'm fine, thanks for asking. And how are you today?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS