61st International Astronautical Congress

Status
Not open for further replies.
E

EarthlingX

Guest
http://www.esa.int : Global space event in the Golden City
7 September 2010


Prague: the Golden City

This month the International Astronautical Congress will be held in Prague for the first time in 33 years. The global event highlights the growing activities in space industry, science and education in the Czech Republic — ESA's newest Member State.

The 61st International Astronautical Congress (IAC) will take place in Prague from 27 September to 1 October. The annual congress encourages the advancement of space knowledge and enables the global space community to share its experience and deepen worldwide cooperation.

The event spotlights the long space research and development history and ambitions of the Czech Republic, which joined ESA in 2008.

The Czech Space Office (CSO) was established in 2003, when the country became one of the first to join ESA's Plan for European Cooperating States (PECS).
http://www.spaceref.com : High-Level Space Leaders and Young Professionals Start Debates on Key Space Issues at the Space Generation Congress 2010
Source: Space Generation Advisory Council

Posted Thursday, September 23, 2010


SGC 2010 Opening Ceremony at Charles University, Prague

Between 23 and 25 September 2010, Prague, Czech Republic will become the headquarters for international space matters. High-level space leaders and young professionals in the sector will come together to debate the latest space topics of interest at the Space Generation Congress (SGC) 2010, the annual conference of the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC). The discussions will focus on five major themes: Industry, Agency, Climate, Exploration and Outreach.
...
Confirmed speakers include:

- Barbara Adde: Policy and Strategic Communications (PSC) Manager for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program

- Charles F. Bolden: NASA Administrator

- Ben Corbin: Aerospace Engineering and Planetary Science Masters Student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

- Chris De Cooker: Head of the International Relations Department at the European Space Agency (ESA)

- Berndt P. Feuerbacher: President of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF)

- Mike Kearny: Chairman and General Secretary of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS)

- John Logsdon: Professor Emeritus at George Washington University's Elliot School of International Affairs

- Clayton Mowry: President of Arianespace, Inc.

- Zdenek Nemecek: Dean of the Charles University Department of Mathematics and Physics

- Dumitru Prunariu: Chairman of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS)

- William Watson: Executive Director of the Space Frontier Foundation (SSF)

- Ray Williamson: Executive Director of the Secure World Foundation (SWF)

- Jim Zimmerman: President of International Space Services, Inc.
...
For the biographies of the moderators, rapporteurs, subject matter experts, and speakers of each session please refer to:
http://spacegeneration.org/index.php/eventstopics/news/240-the-september-newsletter-has-been-released

The full programme of the conference, which takes place at the Charles University (Malostranske nam. 25, 118 00 Praha 1), is available here (PDF).

For additional information please visit the SGC 2010 website.

Follow us on Twitter during the congress: http://twitter.com/sgac or by using #SGC2010
...


http://www.spaceref.com : Thousands Gather for the 61st International Astronautical Congress (links in the article)
By Marc Boucher

Posted Wednesday, September 22, 2010

The 61st International Astronautical Congress (IAC) will take place in the beautiful Czech Replublic capital of Prague between Monday, September 27th and conclude on Friday, October 1st with a Gala Dinner. To date over 2500 delegates have registered according to an IAC representative with an expected 3000 delates in total.

The IAC is organised by the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) and the local organizing committee, the Czech Space Office. This is the second time the IAC meeting has been held in Prague having previously been held in 1977. At that only the former Soviet Union and the United States participated in manned space flights. Since then astronauts from 34 other countries have been in space including China which is now only the third country with the ability to launch humans into space.

This years congress theme is "Space for Human benefit and exploration" and with 13 technical sessions which are further subdivided into over 73 sub-sessions there's something for every delagates interest. The theme of the congress reflects the importance of practical applications of space to everyday life as an increasing number of contries realize the benefits of space applications to their citizens lives. As well the theme reflects humanities desire for greater space exploration.

In conjunction with the IAC there are several other events ongoing. They include the 20th United Nations/IAF Workshop on "Global Navigation Satellite Systems Applications for Human Benefit and Development" and the Space Generation Congress, both which precede the start of IAC. The Space Generation Congress is the annual meeting of the Space Generation Advisory Council which brings together the top university students and young professionals who have been selected from among applicants from the Space Generation international network.

Also preceeding the start of IAC on Sunday, September 26th will be the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Academy Day will be held jointly with the Czech Academy of Sciences.

During the IAC other events include the International Air and Space Law Association which will hold its Moot Court Finals. The Moot Court competition was created to provide an opportunity for students to participate in an international moot court competition in space law.

Another event ongoing during the IAC is the Cluster Forum. The forum gathers decision makers and business developers from major corporations, large and small space agencies, smaller businesses, consulting firms and universities. Highlighting the Cluster Forum are the four forum sessions during IAC; the Space Industry Forum, the Nanosatellite Fair, the B2B and Knowledge Sharing Forum and the Central and Eastern Europe in Space Forum.

Climate change is also on the agenda as goverment representatives from nations around the world will be gather to particiapte in a dialogue about the use of space technology to diagnose climate change and to develop countermeasures.

The congress will open up with an opening ceremony which will showcase Czech culture through its history including medieval dance and music to contemporary artists.
...
This story is part of a special presentation by SpaceRef on The 61st International Astronautical Congress. For more news during the congress please visit our special page at:
http://spaceref.com/news/iac2010/


http://www.iac2010.cz : 61st International Astronautical Congress
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
spacegeneration.org : Space Generation Congress 2010 Kicks Off
24 September

The first day of the Space Generation Congress (SGC) 2010 organised by the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC) got off to a flying start yesterday with 100 top delegates gathering together in Prague to debate the latest space issues. The event marks a milestone in SGC history as the largest youth space event to date.
Ariane Cornell, SGAC Executive Director and SGC 2010 Congress Manager, opened the Congress by welcoming the delegates and clarifying the goals of the event. SGAC Chair, Agnieszka Lukaszczyk, followed by introducing the organisation and its objectives.
The highlight of the day was the talk of SGC featured speaker, Dr. Dumitru Prunariu, Chairman of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS). He set the tone of the Congress by addressing current global challenges and opportunities in the space sector from workforce issues to exploration. Most importantly, he emphasized the role of the youth in future space development activities.
The majority of the day was spent in the project working sessions, as SGC 2010 delegates broke into five groups to discuss the Congress topics. The delegates, representing 40 different countries, brought to the debate their experiences and were complemented by young subject matter experts.

The Industry Project Group focused on remote sensing, space transportation, space applications, and International Space Station (ISS)-related issues. They approached the analysis from both a technical and a legal perspective. They also analysed the industry area taking into account different policies, government intervention, ethics etc.

The Agency Project Group looked at past examples of disaster management to identify to what extent emergency information is available in real time. They also brainstormed the types of information that are most useful to people immediately following a disaster. Finally, the group looked into the necessary steps of designing a disaster management cycle.

The Climate Project Group covered many topics, which included existing climate and weather monitoring technologies, data and metadata collection standards, as well as the responsibility of countries as global community members to contribute to climate studies. The group focused on technical capacities taking into account the underlying social and economical issues. A key identified point was that only few countries operate climate monitoring systems, yet the results are vital to all countries.

During the first day of SGC 2010, the Exploration Project Group set their starting point: the necessity of human exploration missions to other planets to inspire the youth. They also debated the idea of going back to the Moon before considering a mission to Mars. A key conclusion from the group’s first day was that astronauts should be the envoys of humanity, not of a single nation.
...

Tomorrow, the working groups will continue their projects, as well as look forward to a movie premier of an SGAC-produced feature on the history of the modern space age, and hear speeches from:

* Move an Asteroid competition winner, Ben Corbin;
* Agency Session Speakers, Barbara Adde (NASA's Space Communications and Navigation [SCaN] Program) and Mike Kearny (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems [CCSDS]);
* Featured Speaker, Jim Zimmerman, President of International Space Services, Inc.

Access to information in real time can be had by following #SGAC on Twitter.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
SGAC
One of the most inspiring projects born at #sgc: the Blue Marble @OneFlaginSpace http://ow.ly/2JKQl

http://www.oneflaginspace.org : About : One flag in space

Our mission is to promote the use of the “Blue Marble” as a symbol of world unity in space exploration. It is a symbol that anyone, anywhere in the world can relate to, regardless of nationality, ethnic origin or religious beliefs, yet does not require political collaboration between space-faring nations.

Astronauts/cosmonauts, national space-agencies, or private companies venturing in manned or unmanned vehicles in and beyond low Earth orbit, are acting as ambassadors of planet Earth. The "Blue Marble", the first complete picture of Earth taken from space by humans in 1972, fits this universally appealing symbol. Placed on the shoulder pads of astronauts/cosmonauts, or prominently displayed on space-bound hardware, it would send a universal message that space exploration is done for the benefit of humanity as a whole, not just space-faring nations.

We believe that one day, at least in space, our planet will be working together for the benefit of everyone.
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.federalspace.ru : 61st International Astronautical Congress (IAC) to open in Prague, Czech Republic
:: 27.09.2010

IAC 2010 will be held in Prague, Czech Republic, from 27 September to 1 October 2010 under the theme: “Space for human benefit and exploration”. The Congress is the world's premier international space gathering attracting every year heads of space agencies, industry executives and experts to discuss the latest advancements in space technology and exploration, as well as the newest political and economical developments in the space sector. This year again, more than 2500 delegates are expected at the Prague Congress Centre. The last day of the Congress, 1 October, focusing on the Eastern European countries will be open to the general public and free of charge.

Over the course of the Congress, 1706 quality papers will be presented in a rich and varied technical programme of 162 sessions. In addition, the public programme will include 8 plenaries, 4 highlight lectures and 3 late breaking news sessions. Business to business opportunities are offered the International Exhibition with 61 exhibitors and the expanded 2nd International Cluster Forum. The 2010 UN-IAF Workshop and the 2nd International Meeting for Members of Parliament are also part of a supporting series of events in Prague.
Delegation of the Russian Federal Space Agency led by Roscosmos Head Anatoly Perminov will take part in the Congress.

Plenary 1 - Heads of Agency Plenary - to take place today will be attended by: Anatoly Perminov (Roscosmos), Charles Bolden (NASA), Jean-Jacques Dordain (ESA), K. Radhakrishnan (ISRO), Keiji Tachikawa (JAXA), Steve MacLean (Canadian Space Agency), Chen Qiufa (China National Space Administration). Agency Heads will provide an overview of their current programmes and insight into future plans, giving views on actual developments and potential international opportunities. An interactive discussion with the audience will follow.

Roscosmos and IAF PAO
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
http://www.spaceref.com : NASA's Charles Bolden Answers Questions at the Agency Heads Plenary of the 61st International Astronautical Congress
By Marc Boucher

Posted Monday, September 27, 2010

Below are the four questions in which NASA Administrator Charles Bolden answered questions from the moderator and the audience.

The question context is in reference to a statement that Bolden made earlier this in which he said NASA would work towards getting humans to Mars not in months but weeks.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=teb9Gl2-s5U[/youtube]
SpaceRefOnOrbit | September 27, 2010
In this next question the context is in regards to using "cheaper" commercial access providers.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paWrBgUY6_0[/youtube]

In this question Bolden answers the question of adding new partners for the International Space Station and partnering with China.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUaQHfP71Hk[/youtube]

In the final question Bolden discusses NASA's growing spending and commitment to environmental issues.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs3HzZCxIbo[/youtube]

More video from other agency heads will be available soon.
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.federalspace.ru : Roscosmos Head Anatoly Perminov Makes Presentation at the Heads of the Agency Plenary
:: 27.09.2010

Heads of the Agency Plenary took place today at 61st International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Prague.
Prior to the speech to be made by Roscosmos Head, moderator of the plenary reminded about the problem occured during Soyuz TMA-18 departure from the ISS, and congratulated Russian party on successful return of the crew.
“We had to close the issue quickly, as we were hurrying to get to the Congress”, Anatoly Nikolaevich joked, causing smiles and applauses of the audience.



Presentation by Roscosmos Head Anatoly Perminov
at the Heads of the Agency Plenary
IAC-2010, Sept. 27
Prague


“Roscosmos actively uses space technologies for innovative economical evolution.
With the budget much lower than the NASA’s one, we have to work day and night to achieve the objectives we have.
We keep high launch intensiveness of Russian rocket carriers. Since last October, we have made 29 launches, i.e. 41% of the number of launches in the world.
We pay much attention to enhancing Russian space communication systems, in particular, second-generation spacecraft of low-orbit communication system Gonets.
This year we plan to provide global coverage by Russian navigation system GLONASS. This means 24 operational spacecraft in orbit, with 3-4 in redundancy.
Flight tests of GSO weather satellite Electro-L will begin in late 2010, and we pay significant attention to development of the scientific spacecraft.
We have completed design and search activities, and begin construction of the first launch pad in the Far East of our country.
Concerning international cooperation, it’s rather intensive.
But the main, critical, thing is completion of the Soyuz launch pad in French Guiana.
The other important project is the International Space Station. Here, I would like to thank for the support… It’s really so, encouragement of the heads of the agencies was obvious in our hour of need.
With respect to advanced projects, we started reviewing designs of heavy-lft and super-heavy-lift launchers, on the available technological grounds, and development of advanced technologies for the prospective rocket carriers.
However we can’t stack on this stage, as the existing rocket engines are not capable of supporting fast interplanetary missions. Thus, we have initiated experimental and design activities to develop a new propulsion with nuclear energy source. The system can be used for interplanetary flights, missions to remote planets, or as an inter-orbital tug”.

Roscosmos PAO
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.spacenews.com : ESA Re-entry Vehicle Tied to Station Extension
Mon, 27 September, 2010

By Peter B. de Selding

PRAGUE, Czech Republic — The European Space Agency (ESA) will be seeking the approval of is member states late this year to extend its participation in the international space station to 2020, a decision that will bind participating nations to preset budget contributions, ESA officials said Sept. 27.

ESA officials hope to use their member governments’ approval of a five-year extension to win endorsement for development of a reusable version of Europe’s Automated Transfer Vehicle, an unmanned freighter that delivers supplies to the station and reboosts the station’s orbit before being filled with garbage and burned up on a controlled re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere.

If the station’s service life is extended to 2020, the agency has a greater incentive to replace the Automated Transfer Vehicle with an Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) that would return cargo to Earth.

ESA’s space station director, Simonetta di Pippo, said none of the agency’s delegations has voiced opposition to the five-year extension and that she is confident it will be approved. If that is the case, she said, the agency will propose to its governments to spend some 150 million euros ($200 million) on preparations for an ARV. Full development, which would cost considerably more, would then be proposed to ESA government ministers scheduled to meet sometime in 2012.

Speaking to reporters here during the 61st International Astronautical Congress, di Pippo said a decision to develop ARV would be accompanied by the cancellation of the sixth and seventh Automated Transfer Vehicle. Money saved on building these vessels would offset some of the ARV development costs. A full ARV program approval in 2012 would permit the agency to begin flying the vehicle perhaps around 2017.

ESA has agreed to repay NASA, the space station’s general contractor, in services rather than cash in return for NASA’s provision of the station’s operating expenses, which among other things permits ESA’s Columbus habitable module to function. Automated Transfer Vehicle cargo-delivery and station-reboost flights are part of that payment. ARV would take over that role.

ESA Director-General Jean-Jacques Dordain said here Sept. 27 that while he is confident that the five-year extension has the approval of all European nations participating in the station, he does not want a general agreement without specific guarantees on which nation will pay how much of the associated costs.

For now, Germany, France and Italy pay the dominant share of ESA’s space station expenses. These nations presumably will be asked to continue financing the project through 2020.

“There is no objection to extending the station’s operations to 2020,” Dordain said. “What still needs to be decided is the cost, and the scale of contributions. I don’t want an approval now without deciding this aspect as well. I hate decisions that are ‘subject to availability of funds.’ What we need to agree to now is the distribution of costs. That is the difficult part.”
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.spaceref.com : Czech Culture and Ambition on Display as the 61st International Astronautical Congress Opens in Prague
By Marc Boucher

Posted Monday, September 27, 2010


Czech Cosmonaut Vladimir Remek welcomes the delegates to the Czech Republic

Czech culture mixed with opening ceremony speeches from dignitaries marked the opening of the 61st International Astronautical Congress in Prague where 2800 delegates have gathered.

While the Czech Republic does not have a national space agency as yet, it certainly isn't for the lack of enthusiasm as demonstrated by Czech officials including local organization committee Chairman Jan Kolar. In between cultural entertainment were direct messages to the delegates convened that the Czech Republic is open for business and it means to grow its fledgling industry into a space nation willing to partner with world organizations.

In 2004 that the Czech Republic became a member of the European Union (EU) and is taking full advantage of it. Since then it became a full member of the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2008. In anticipation of becoming a member of the ESA, the Czech government created a non-profit in November 2003 to oversee space activities. That entity is the Czech Space Office which is responsible for implementing and managing space activities including relations with the European Space Agency, space industry and working with foreign organizations.


Czech culture was on display during the opening from contemporary artists to folk dance and music

The Czech Republic is not new to space. In fact during medieval times it was know as a leading astronomical center. More recently in 1969 instruments developed by Czechoslovakia, as it was known back then, where flown on the Soviet Interkosmos 1. In March 1978 Czechoslovakia became only the third country to send a human to space as Cosmonaut Vladimir Remek joined the crew of the Soviet Union Soyuz 28.

Remek now a Member of the European Parliament said of the congress "I have seen our planet Earth only with the natural borders such as rivers, mountains, seas and oceans in the course of my space flight. I believe that the 61st International Astronautical Congress contributes towards creation of no other borders among us, inhabitants of our lovely planet. But on the contrary to pull down the artificial ones which divides us so often."
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
http://www.aviationweek.com : NASA Chief Goes to Beijing In October
Sep 27, 2010

By Frank Morring, Jr. morring@aviationweek.com
PRAGUE

Plans are well along for NASA Administrator Charles Bolden to make a delayed trip to Beijing for what may be the opening round of talks leading to closer international cooperation in human spaceflight.

NASA officials stressed that there has been no final invitation for Bolden to visit China at a specific time. However, officials in Beijing already are preparing for the visit, amid suggestions at the International Astronautical Congress (IAC) here that it could come in October.

Both sides are approaching the upcoming meeting with caution, but its background suggests that the problem is more one of details and agenda than of whether it will take place. Last November the joint statement issued after President Barack Obama met Chinese President Hu Jintao in Beijing included a call for the NASA administrator to meet with his Chinese counterpart in China — without specifying who that would be.

Bolden originally planned to visit China last April, but withdrew to allow more time for policy coordination inside the U.S. government.

At the same time, Chinese officials were expressing a desire for substantive talks on human cooperation in space. At the National Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colo., Wang Wenbao, head of the China Manned Space Engineering Office, told U.S. reporters China was ready to discuss interface parameters for docking the Shenzhou crew vehicle to the International Space Station.

Bolden is in Prague for meetings with European, Russian, Japanese and other officials to discuss plans for continuing to operate the ISS until 2020, now that Congress and the White House appear to have agreed on extending U.S. funding at least until that date. Wang is not attending the IAC this year, but Zhou Jianping, the U.S.-educated head of the China Manned Space Engineering Program, is present as the head of a delegation from the military office that controls China’s human spaceflight program.

Zhou leads the technical side of China’s human-spaceflight organization. Also attending the IAC are representatives of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp., which builds China’s space vehicles, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

One apparent U.S. concern about a Bolden visit to Beijing is the agenda. When Bolden’s predecessor, Michael Griffin, visited in September 2006, he and his delegation were disappointed at the low level of access they got to Chinese space facilities. However, since then China has proved more willing to allow foreigners to visit previously sensitive sites, including the Shenzhou launch site at Jiuquan and the astronaut training center in Beijing.
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
spacecoalition.com : Space Leaders Outline Issues, Challenges Ahead
September 28, 2010

Capitol Hill News

PRAGUE, Czech Republic – Here at the 61st International Astronautical Congress, some 3,000 experts from around the world are discussing every facet of 21st century space activity.

The theme of the gathering taking place September 27 – October 1 is “Space for human benefit and exploration” – clearly the tone of meeting too.

On opening day, at a Heads of Agency plenary, top officials from their respective space agencies detailed activities today and provided a look at space agendas for the near-future.

In several surprising developments, Russia’s Anatoly Perminov, Head of Roscosmos, observed that his agency is pushing forward on research and development in two areas: an in-space nuclear propulsion capability, as well as pursuing a new breed of super heavy-lift launcher.

Perminov signaled use of this capability to boost the prospects for a human mission to Mars, among other future initiatives.

“Myself, I am convinced that exploration will be a field of global cooperation…that is for sure,” advised Jean-Jacques Dordain, Director General of the European Space Agency (ESA). He called 2010 a year of significant science and discovery in reviewing ESA’s space efforts, but also said linking space to the general public needs to be a priority.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.federalspace.ru : MAKSM Project Gets its Legal Status
:: 28.09.2010

The International Public Committee on MAKSM project (international global natural and industrial emergency aerospace monitoring system) has held its meeting in Prague on Sept. 27, in the framework of International Astronautical Congress – 2010.
The agenda covered discussions of Committee’s draft charter, plan of future activities, organizational issues, membership in the Committee.
MAKSM presents an initiative of Russian scientists and public organizations actively promoted on the global level. The distinguishing feature of MAKSM is defined as warning of the world community about global threats, including space object threats.
The Project covers detection of natural disaster precursors (there are about 300 precursors, according to the estimates) through special space, aviation and ground. Such phenomena become evident as geo-sphere’s anomalies and provide the opportunity to predict catastrophic events of geological of meteorological nature.
The meeting of the Committee chaired by Roscosmos Head Anatoly Perminov and co-chaired by his colleagues of Ukraine and Kazakhstan – Yury Alekseev and Talgat Musabaev – was attended by 47 representatives from more than 20 countries and international organizations. The meeting was witnessed by observers - D.D.Prunariu (UN), I.Plaksin (Russian Embassy in Prague), other officials, mass media.
Opening the meeting, Mr. Perminov noted that MAKSM made great progress within less than a year, from a scientific idea to draft concept of an organizational and engineering system which is to unite different data, telecommunication, navigation aerospace tools in order to maintain caution about natural and industrial disasters which remain one of the most dangerous threats for the mankind. On the other hand, Roscosmos Head said, MAKSM is just in the very beginning of its way. Many scientific, technological, engineering, organizational and other problems are still to be resolved on the level of wide-range international cooperation prior to development of a seismic/volcanic weather prediction tool.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.federalspace.ru : Asteroid Protection Projects Shall Be Carried Out on International Level- Roscosmos Head
:: 28.09.2010

Roscosmos initiates an international asteroid protection project, Head of the Russian Federal Space Agency told news media during International Astronautical Congress in Prague, right after the meeting of the International Public Committee on MAKSM project (international global natural and industrial emergency aerospace monitoring system).
«This project /development of anti-asteroid protection/ - is rather expensive. Asteroids threat to the mankind, so the project shall get international status», Perminov said. «We have already negotiated it with ESA and European Union, however these were just talks».
Answering the question, why the anti-asteroid protection initiative does not cause any interest from the partner agencies, might be lack of money or will, Roscosmos Head said that it could be for any of these reasons.
Perminov also mentioned that the threat of the Apophys asteroid is obviously not so major, according to the recent estimates, and the leading space agencies are not paying much attention to the problem anymore.
«Apophys itself is not so hazardous. But it may be used to test and validate asteroid protection systems”, Roscosmos Head said.
According to him, Roscosmos and Russian Academy of Sciences have established a group which deals with the issue. Several options are evaluated by the group.
«There are several options: a spacecraft to land on the asteroid to change its trajectory with the assistance of its propulsion; then, small systems could be accommodated on the surface of a space body to adjust its trajectory with the help of solar power; or an asteroid could be destroyed by an existing type of weapon», Roscosmos Head explained.
He added that the last option was not “purely space one. It can be applied in case of an emergency».
Perminov stated also that the most probable is to send a probe to an asteroid, or to land it on the celestial body.
«In any case, we believe it’s reasonable to execute the project not by efforts of a single country, but on international level», Roscosmos Head concluded.

Roscosmos PAO
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.spaceref.com : International Astronautical Congress Quick Bits for Tuesday, September 28
By Marc Boucher

Posted Tuesday, September 28, 2010

- At the 2nd Plenary: Impact of Governments' Space Policy Changes on Industry saw a limited government view as only the European Space Agency and a Japanese representatives were available. On the industry side were five representatives from the United States, Japan and Europe (3). Industry reps cited "uncertainty" in the current market making things difficult and there is no current business model for the changes underway in the US. The plenary time was an hour and half but it was obvious given more time the the panel could have discussed a lot more. (Details to follow in a separate article by SpaceRef)

-- Canadian Space Agency representative Jean-Claude Piedboeuf mentions that a final Canadian Strategic Exploration Plan will be released internally in March, 2011 but does not know if the Canadian Government will release it publicly. (Details to follow in a separate article by SpaceRef)

-- From Ken Davidian at the "Encouragement of Government Purchasing from Commercial Providers: Models and Examples session.

On Erin Dinardi's paper from SpaceX: COTS paradigm as a model for govt/comm'l engagement - SpaceX "plans to develop a 3rd launch site at Vandenberg. COTS is best example of new acquisition paradigm. COTS is a capability demomstration agreement. Not a contract. Key points: not a contract ... It's a space act agreement. Performnce-based milestone payments."

-- Surrey Satellite unveils high-resolution space project

"A $100m pound project has been announced to launch three new British spacecraft to image the surface of the Earth. The satellites, to be orbited in 2013, will be able to see details down to one metre at their best resolution. It is a commercial venture between the spacecraft manufacturer Surrey Satellite Technology Limited and its data processing subsidiary, DMCii."

-- The Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos announced it would Hold More than 10 Meetings with the Other Space Agencies during IAC-2010

"More than 10 meetings with the leading space agencies are in Roscosmos' schedule for the 61st International Astronautical Congress (IAC) to be held in Prague, Czech Republic, from 27 September to 1 October 2010, under the theme: "Space for human benefit and exploration", Head of Russian Federal Space Agency Anatoly Perminov said questioned by news media during the IAC opening ceremony this morning."

-- It was announced Beijing, China would host the 64th International Astronautical Congress in 2013

-- This story is part of a special presentation by SpaceRef on The 61st International Astronautical Congress. For more news during the congress please visit our special page at: http://spaceref.com/news/iac2010/
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.spaceflightnow.com : ESA previews next year's budget amid tight economy
BY STEPHEN CLARK

Posted: September 28, 2010

PRAGUE -- Europe's top space official says his space agency is preparing for the same budget next year as this year, telling reporters he has received no indications that member states will reduce their contributions during an ongoing financial crisis.

"We are proposing a budget for 2011 which is calling for the same contributions from the member states as the budget for 2010," said Jean-Jacques Dordain, director general of the European Space Agency. "There is not a reduction in our demand from member states."

Dordain also said ESA's 18 member states have not said they need to cut their space funding beyond the levels agreed to in a spending freeze announced early this year.

ESA limited itself to 3.35 billion euros, or $4.5 billion, in spending this year. Its budget remains higher, but the space agency committed to reshuffling its programs and contracts to stretch out industrial payments and save money.

So far, none of ESA's approved programs have suffered delays or cancellations due to the spending freeze.

Dordain said he has prepared contingency plans in case further budget cuts are necessary, but he did not provide details on the potential measures.
...
"I am not expecting a different budget for 2011," Dordain said. "What we are doing is different from the activities we are doing to control costs."

Dordain said ESA is in the middle of a major cost-cutting effort, the first monetary audit of the agency since 1995.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
http://www.spacenews.com : Japan Seeks To Reorient Space Spending
Tue, 28 September, 2010

By Peter B. de Selding

PRAGUE, Czech Republic — The Japanese government wants to promote more private-sector space development by reorienting its spending away from its research focus and toward commercially oriented programs and crafting a new law to permit commercial launch services, Japanese government and industry officials said Sept. 28.

Addressing the 61st International Astronautical Congress here, these officials said the Japanese government’s recent decisions to develop the Epsilon small-satellite launcher and to extend the annual operating window for the heavy-lift H-2A rocket to year-round operations are examples of this new focus. So is the start of development of a 400-kilogram Earth observation satellite

Hiroshi Yamakawa, secretary-general of Japan’s Strategic Headquarters for Space Policy, created two years ago to streamline Japan’s government space bureaucracy, said the government is determined to create a more entrepreneurial space culture in Japan.

The next step in the process, he said, is a Space Activities Law, now being debated in the government, that among other things would provide third-party-liability coverage for launch vehicles developed outside the normal channels of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.

Japan has developed rocket and satellite technologies that, until recently, were not aggressively sold on export markets. Yamakawa said that is changing as the government sees the space industry as a vector for technology development and for international technology cooperation.

Shoichira Asada, general manager for space systems at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, said the government’s policy move is a recognition that Japan’s space sector, developed with heavy government investment over 20 years, cannot survive without export revenue.

“Only in the United States is domestic demand enough to get a satisfactory return on investment,” Asada said, referring to the space sector in general and the launch-services business in particular. He suggested that while it might be “premature” to embark on a policy of moving astronaut launches to the commercial sector, a commercial industry needs to be developed on a sustainable basis. That means looking outside Japan for business.

Launch vehicles the world over benefit from the guarantees of their home governments that, beyond a certain sum, the government will step in to cover launches if a vehicle injures people or causes major property damage. The Space Activities Law being reviewed by the government would extend that coverage, known as indemnification, to commercially developed rockets.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
http://www.spaceflightnow.com : Soyuz launch pad moves closer to flight readiness
BY STEPHEN CLARK

Posted: September 28, 2010

PRAGUE -- A committee of Russian and European officials will meet in October to assess the status of the behind-schedule Soyuz launch facility in French Guiana and decide when it could be ready to support flights of the storied rocket.

Artist's concept of the Soyuz rocket launching from the Guiana Space Center. Credit: ESA/CNES
Jean-Jacques Dordain, the European Space Agency's director general, said institutional and industrial representatives will meet Oct. 12 discuss the development of a dedicated Soyuz launch pad at the Guiana Space Center.

Set in the French Guiana jungle near Kourou, the French-controlled facility is also home to the Ariane 5 rocket.

"I can tell you that the availability of Soyuz for the first launch will be decided on the 12th of October," Dordain told reporters here Monday.
...
"We would do it completely differently if we had to redo this project," said Jean-Marc Astorg, the coordinator of the Soyuz project in Kourou for CNES, the French space agency.
...
In a sign of renewed commitment to the project, Anatoly Perminov, chief of the Russian space agency, said Monday his top priority for international cooperation is the completion of the Soyuz facilities in French Guiana.

"It is most critical is to finish the construction work on the Soyuz launch (pad) in French Guiana," Perminov said here. "Our second task is the International Space Station."
...
Astorg identified constraining export control regulations as another weakness in the Soyuz partnership.

"Export control is a major concern," Astorg said. "Sometimes we are forced to wait two months before getting technical notes."

"Communication is still a problem, not only because of the language but because of the culture and so on," Astorg said. "And also the decision-making process is quite different in Russia and in Europe."
...
If the facility is technically qualified by December, as currently scheduled, a Soyuz booster could be rolled 650 meters in early 2011 from the integration hall to the launch pad.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.federalspace.ru : Russian Space Initiatives Get a Lot of Attention at IAC-2010
:: 29.09.2010

Russian space initiatives get a lot of attention at the International Astronautical Congress which is held in Prague this week, ITAR-TASS informs.
“The USSR and the Russian Federation play a leading role in exploration of the Universe with their national spacecraft. Russia is a deserved leader in construction of the space stations to be discussed at the Forum”, Vladimir Remek, first Czech cosmonaut, Hero of the USSR, said.
IAC 2010 is held in Prague, Czech Republic, from 27 September to 1 October 2010 under the theme: “Space for human benefit and exploration”.
The International Astronautical Federation (IAF) is pleased to announce that the 2010 Allan D. Emil Memorial Award has been awarded.
The selection was made by the IAF Honours and Awards Committee, chaired by Sir Martin Sweeting (Surrey Satellite Technology Limited). Nominated by the Central Research Institute of Machine Building (TSNIIMASH), Academician Professor Dr Anfimov.
On the last day of the Congress, at the Closing Ceremony of the 61st International Astronautical Congress, the 2010 Allan D. Emil Memorial Award is to be presented to Russian Prof. Dr Nikolay A. Anfimov who has made an outstanding contribution to space science and technology not only within his native Russia but also more importantly in the sustained personal promotion of international collaboration.
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.esa.int : Laurels for Cluster-Double Star teams
28 September 2010


Ceremony for the International Academy of Astronautics Laurels 2010

ESA’s Cluster and China’s Double Star have been awarded the Laurels for Team Achievement by The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). Between 2004 and 2007, the two missions returned fundamental new insights into magnetic physics, and built a bridge for future collaborations.

The award ceremony took place in Prague, Czech Republic, on 26 September, during the International Astronautical Congress. ESA’s Cluster mission comprises four identical spacecraft that were launched in 2000. Four spacecraft is the smallest number that are needed to monitor three-dimensional changes in Earth’s magnetic field as it is buffeted by the constant wind of particles from the Sun.
...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
www.spaceref.com : The Impact on Industry of Major Government Space Policy Changes
Source: International Astronautical Federation

Posted Tuesday, September 28, 2010

On the occasion of the annual International Astronautical Congress (IAC) organized by the IAF, the Industry Relations Committee has set up the plenary meeting dedicated to the impact of governments' space policy changes on industry.

This item was debated by the representatives of major agencies and industrial partners from the space-faring nations of Europe, Asia and the United States in order to address the issue.

The main outcomes, presented by the Chairman of the Industry Relations Committee, Mr. Jean-Yves Le Gall (Chairman & CEO of Arianespace), are the following:

- The main programmes initiated by governments and space agencies stimulate industrial space activity.

- Industry has a strong capacity to adapt itself to national space policies.

- Political, institutional or industrial uncertainties are a real handicap for space agencies as well as for industry.

Therefore, an evolution of space policies and industrial organisations is better than a revolution to ensure the long-term stability of the sector and its competitiveness.
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
http://www.spaceflightnow.com : Europe's re-entry capsule to build upon ATV experience
BY STEPHEN CLARK

Posted: September 29, 2010

PRAGUE -- European officials say developing a re-entry module for its conceptual two-way space station cargo freighter would best position the continent for future human spaceflight applications, but its realization will depend on budget decisions starting late this year.


Artist's concept of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle. Credit: ESA

The European Space Agency plans to request approval from its member states by the end of this year for continued participation in the International Space Station through 2020 and further development of an Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle.

Speaking at the 61st International Astronautical Congress here, top ESA officials described how the cash-strapped agency plans continue its involvement in the space station through at least 2020.
...
Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA's director general, said he expects to receive the go-ahead for the space station life extension from the agency's member states by the end of 2010.

The governments of Russia and Japan have already approved the extra five years of life and the associated financial commitment. ESA, Canada and the United States are still awaiting formal confirmation.

Around the same time, ESA expects to ask for about 150 million euros, or about $200 million, for Phase B of the ARV, an upgraded version of Europe's logistics carrier that first flew in 2008.
...
Approval for Phase C and Phase D, the most costly part of any space development project, will have to wait for the next Ministerial Council meeting in 2012, said Simonetta Di Pippo, the director of ESA's human spaceflight programs.
..
Europe could also build more ATVs for one-way resupply services, but officials say they want to develop a more capable system.

"I don't believe that's the way to go," Di Pippo said. "In the end, we want to use this new development on a longer-term (program) for the space station."

Instead of ordering more copies of the ATV, the agency is proposing development of the ARV with the ability to return supplies and pressurized equipment, a significant need for the station after next year's retirement of the space shuttle.
...

Diagrams of the ARV and crewed capsule atop an Ariane 5 rocket. Credit: ESA
...
"What we want to do is reuse to the maximum extent possible (our experience) on ATV," Di Pippo said.
...
The ARV could be ready for a demonstration flight by 2017 if ESA receives approval in 2012. Early requirements show it will carry at least 4,400 pounds of dry cargo to the station and return about 3,300 pounds.
...
The ARV would be outfitted with ESA's new international docking and berthing mechanism, permitting it to dock with both the Russian and U.S. segments of the station. ATV missions are currently restricted to docking with the aft port of the Russian Zvezda service module.
...
Engineers are also considering more radical redesigns of the ATV, utilizing a clean sheat approach that could be evolved to carry unpressurized cargo or astronauts, Caporicci said.

But Di Pippo said the best approach is to reuse as many ATV design elements as possible to keep costs manageable.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts