All about NASA!

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pioneer0333

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Does NASA have any plans to in-corporate regular civilians into the space program? I think that this kind of move would "re-spark" public interest in the program. It's a long shot, but allowing a regular civilian to participate in the next Apollo missions would really do the trick for funding of the space program in the future. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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qso1

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They had such plans during the shuttle era with plans to put teachers, reporters and I'm not sure who else in space but just as they were re-considering sending Crista McCauliffes backup (Barbara Morgan) into space, Columbia occured.<br /><br />The return to the moon will probably require the non-pilots to be scientists such as geologists or astronomers which is as close to civilian fliers as your probably ever going to get at NASA until someone (NASA or private enterprise) starts sending people up on a frequent basis. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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As a sidenote, there are civilian astronauts (meaning, astronauts without military titles) and civilian cosmonauts as well. They are all very talented scientists, doctors, and/or engineers -- and usually pilots as well. Multiple advanced degrees are common; it's hard to get in as a civilian without a very impressive resume. (And really, it's just as hard to get in as a military astronaut; the only advantage they have is possible experience flying supersonic aircraft -- you need a certain number of hours in high performance aircraft before they'll let you sit up front in the Shuttle.) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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Definetely need that degree, and then some. Usually the military folks apply for shuttle pilot and I seem to recall something like 5,000 hours stick time in high performance aircraft. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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Saiph

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hmm...it makes sense, but I think it's a titch funny that the pilots have to have 5,000 hours in high performance aircraft, and are then given a brick to land/crash. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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Flying the shuttle is probably closer to being a transport pilots gig but NASA apparently decided to stick with fighter pilots. As it is, the pilots don't do a lot of manual stick time in the shuttle during an actual mission. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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It's more to do with the ability to think fast, communicate, and physically react under high pressure situations successfully. Qaulities that are nearly automatic with fighter pilots. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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qso1

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Thats true, and I guess it takes a fighter pilot who really wants to fly in space to fly the shuttle. This because most fighter pilots would be bored on shuttle missions with what little seat of the pants flying they would actually do. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Flying the shuttle is probably closer to being a transport pilots gig but NASA apparently decided to stick with fighter pilots. As it is, the pilots don't do a lot of manual stick time in the shuttle during an actual mission.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Under normal conditions, that's true. But if something goes horribly wrong and they have to fly it in on manual, wouldn't you rather have a pilot who's actually flown supersonic before?<br /><br />Plus, the most demanding job they get during an ISS mission (piloting wise) is docking. This requires exactly the same sort of thinking that becomes second nature to pilots who must learn to fly in formations with very little margin for error, such as when refueling their fighter jet from a KC-135 at very close to your own aircraft's stall speed. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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qso1

Guest
That makes sense to me and in that respect, I'd pick the fighter pilot over the transport pilot. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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adzel_3000

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Your mention of transport aircraft reminded me of a biography I read about Dick Scobee. He flew like 50 types of aircraft in his career including heavies. He was a pilot in test programs for the C5 and 747. <br /><br />A3K
 
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qso1

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Thats a well rounded pilot who would be an even better choice for shuttle pilot, which of course, Dick Scobee was. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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erioladastra

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And keep in mind that there are also teachers in the corps for the teacher in SPace program. Barbara Morgan is going up next spring. I don't know how many, if any, will go up before the end of the Shuttle.
 
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superluminal

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Does NASA have any plans to in-corporate regular civilians into the space program? I think that this kind of move would "re-spark" public interest in the program. It's a long shot, but allowing a regular civilian to participate in the next Apollo missions would really do the trick for funding of the space program in the future. <br /><br />That's a very good and fair question.<br /><br /> Don't think I work for NASA, I don't. And I wouldn't dare begin to speak as if I did. <br />I admire each and every one there that is actually involved and wish I could shake every ones hand and congratulate them on their fantastic achievements.<br /><br />With that said, here's an idea I had.<br /><br />Space exploration requires more than just money although that is the catalyst.<br />It requires hope and dedication to the young that now occupy the classrooms of our planet.<br /><br />I always wanted to start an educational space lottery, where school children could buy one dollar share space lottery tickets to be applied toward their future scholarships for students planning to be an astronauts and other important fields. <br /><br />One dollar doesn't sound like much until you percentage it and equate it to the first twelve years of schooling per child.<br /><br />In twelve years time it would equate to a lot of money.<br />That money could be channeled into space research and exploration and create even more future high tech jobs.<br /><br /><br />What I'm suggesting is a worldwide junior space lottery with the proceeds to go to the future generations in scholarships at Universities.<br /><br />Students that participated would also be given first consideration to the high tech jobs that would be available to those students who participated the most with space lottery shares.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><strong><font size="3" color="#3366ff">Columbia and Challenger </font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="3" color="#3366ff">Starships of Heroes</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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