Any one seen Andromeda Galaxy

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assadali

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<p>Hello everyone...Well I'm a beginner so my latest task was to spot the nearest galaxy to milky way..i'v read many articles about it and learned that it can be spotted by naked eye..</p><p>if anyone out there who has seen it from telescope..can u plz tell me how it looks like i mean wht up there and if so can u send me a picture taken from normal telescope so that i can see how it looks like....my email is assad.ali@gmail.com</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>all i know it between cassiopia and pegasus constellations...but never able to spot it...</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="6" color="#0000ff"><em>ù§ad</em></font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hello everyone...Well I'm a beginner so my latest task was to spot the nearest galaxy to milky way..i'v read many articles about it and learned that it can be spotted by naked eye..if anyone out there who has seen it from telescope..can u plz tell me how it looks like i mean wht up there and if so can u send me a picture taken from normal telescope so that i can see how it looks like....my email is assad.ali@gmail.com&nbsp;all i know it between cassiopia and pegasus constellations...but never able to spot it... <br />Posted by assadali</DIV><br /><br />It looks like a faint and fuzzy star.&nbsp; I suggest you use a pair of binoculars and and star hop from one star to the next until you find it.&nbsp; Once you know what you are looking for you should see it with the naked eye.&nbsp; But it is very faint.&nbsp; You will need a clear, still moonless night a long way from towns and cities.</p><p>Good luck!</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It looks like a faint and fuzzy star.&nbsp; I suggest you use a pair of binoculars and and star hop from one star to the next until you find it.&nbsp; Once you know what you are looking for you should see it with the naked eye.&nbsp; But it is very faint.&nbsp; You will need a clear, still moonless night a long way from towns and cities.Good luck!Jon <br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV><br /><br />It's been a contant companion on my last few mornings of meteor watching. For me, it's nearly overhead just before morning twilight.</p><p>Jon's advice is good, find it first with Binoculars so you know where to look. Also it helps to use averted vision (where you don't stare directly at it, using your cones in the eye, but look a bit off to the side so the more light sensitive rods come into play).</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">It's been a contant companion on my last few mornings of meteor watching. For me, it's nearly overhead just before morning twilight.Jon's advice is good, find it first with Binoculars so you know where to look. Also it helps to use averted vision (where you don't stare directly at it, using your cones in the eye, but look a bit off to the side so the more light sensitive rods come into play). <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Also it is possible to view the Triangulum Spiral (M33) this way too.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>The Andromeda Galaxy is just to the N E of the star Nu Andromedae.&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Star hop from the fairly bright star Mirach / Beta Andromedae, North East to much fainter Upsilon Andromedae (now known to have several planets), then N.N E again to Nu Andromedae. Just N E of there is the Andromeda Galaxy.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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CoolSammy

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<p>LAST NITE ABOUT 4 AM est&nbsp;IN THE NORTHERN SKI ,&nbsp; I WAS OUTSIDE AND IT LOOK AS IF THERE WAS A BIG BANG! </p><p>Of coasre I was by myself so there's no proof, it's lasted a few seconds...... Usually in the area where the big dipper is around 12am.&nbsp; </p><p>&nbsp;I'm just wondering if anyone else saw this at 4 am EST?&nbsp;&nbsp; IT WAS VERY BRIGHT, I'm not really sure if it was&nbsp; a star or something else! lol</p><p>CoolSammy <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-cool.gif" border="0" alt="Cool" title="Cool" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Welcome Earthlings </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>LAST NITE ABOUT 4 AM est&nbsp;IN THE NORTHERN SKI ,&nbsp; I WAS OUTSIDE AND IT LOOK AS IF THERE WAS A BIG BANG! Of coasre I was by myself so there's no proof, it's lasted a few seconds...... Usually in the area where the big dipper is around 12am.&nbsp; &nbsp;I'm just wondering if anyone else saw this at 4 am EST?&nbsp;&nbsp; IT WAS VERY BRIGHT, I'm not really sure if it was&nbsp; a star or something else! lolCoolSammy <br />Posted by CoolSammy</DIV><br /><br />It could have been a Perseid (or other meteor) on a bright Iridium satellite flare.</p><p>Without knowing where you are, it's hard to say.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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CoolSammy

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It could have been a Perseid (or other meteor) on a bright Iridium satellite flare.Without knowing where you are, it's hard to say. <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV><br /><br /><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><strong>Latitude:</strong>&nbsp;
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Latitude:&nbsp;49.8283333349&deg; 49' 42" N49 degrees, 49 minutes, 42 seconds NorthLongitude:&nbsp;-92.7380555592&deg; 44' 17" W92 degrees, 44 minutes, 17 seconds West&nbsp;no it's wasn't like that at all ... I am just telling you so some else now knows..... I'll leave it at that!take Care!&nbsp; Thxs&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; CoolSammy&nbsp; <br />Posted by CoolSammy</DIV></p><p>That was a Wendigo with a flashlight popping his teeth and coming to get you.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Latitude:&nbsp;49.8283333349&deg; 49' 42" N49 degrees, 49 minutes, 42 seconds NorthLongitude:&nbsp;-92.7380555592&deg; 44' 17" W92 degrees, 44 minutes, 17 seconds West&nbsp;no it's wasn't like that at all ... I am just telling you so some else now knows..... I'll leave it at that!take Care!&nbsp; Thxs&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; CoolSammy&nbsp; <br />Posted by CoolSammy</DIV><br /><br />Can you describe in more detail what you saw? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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eosophobiac

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<p>To the OP (who may&nbsp;have disappeared)&nbsp; <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif" border="0" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" />- </p><p>Yes, I've managed to see the Andromeda Galaxy, and as others have stated, it's a fuzzy, almost blurry smudge.&nbsp; To me, it looks like an&nbsp;elongated fuzzy-smudge.&nbsp; Averted vision does help a lot, though, and my eyesight isn't the greatest, so you may have an even better experience when you do locate it.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>*I will say that after viewing&nbsp;some of the fantastic images other skywatchers have produced, I was slightly disappointed when I saw it with my own&nbsp;eyes, even knowing that those images were the product of many hours of observations using some&nbsp;pretty high-tech&nbsp;equipment (which I say because I am absolutely&nbsp;not tech-savvy!).&nbsp; </p><p>But anyway, definitely have a go at it - it'll only enrich&nbsp;your skygazing experiences!&nbsp; Good luck<font color="#999999">!&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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