Ares 1X launch Oct 27th

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Zipi

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Swampcat":4g1l423x said:
I understand the need for some testing, but let's look back at the beginnings of STS. You would have thought, with such a complicated and non-traditional vehicle (side-mounted payload), there would have been some unmanned test flights. But there weren't. The first test of the system was full-up and manned.
That's because the shuttle has been designed to fly manned. It cannot be flown unmanned as Russian Buran shuttle was able to do. But this is simply a design philosofy issue of the shuttle. Adding unmanned flight possibility would probably have added costs and would needed much more time for tests since the computer technology wasn't that good those days. It is pretty complicated thing to launch the shuttle unmanned and land it unmanned compared to the capsules... But still Russians were able to do it. (and I as well don't want to bash NASA, I just say the facts. NASA shuttle is flying today and Buran is not.)

What comes to testing Ares 1, I think that is certainly as much a publicity issue as technical need. NASA need to show that Constellation program is progressing and this is also a great opportunity to collect some flight data of the new systems and design.
 
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Swampcat

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Zipi":3nzpakku said:
That's because the shuttle has been designed to fly manned. It cannot be flown unmanned as Russian Buran shuttle was able to do. But this is simply a design philosofy issue of the shuttle. Adding unmanned flight possibility would probably have added costs and would needed much more time for tests since the computer technology wasn't that good those days. It is pretty complicated thing to launch the shuttle unmanned and land it unmanned compared to the capsules... But still Russians were able to do it. (and I as well don't want to bash NASA, I just say the facts. NASA shuttle is flying today and Buran is not.)
I'm not suggesting that NASA should have done anything different than a full-up manned test. I was simply trying to contrast the attitudes toward testing between then and now.

What comes to testing Ares 1, I think that is certainly as much a publicity issue as technical need. NASA need to show that Constellation program is progressing and this is also a great opportunity to collect some flight data of the new systems and design.
Consider the technical issues involved with the first STS launch. Certainly, there were more unknowns with STS than there are with Ares I and yet the Enterprise drop tests were the closest they came to a full system test before humans were put on board and the candles lit.

These tests take time and money. If publicity is as important as the gathering of flight data, then NASA is wasting a lot of the taxpayers money and delaying the overall program for very little gain.

Anyway, enjoy the show. I'm looking forward to seeing how this thing flies.
 
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bluegrassgazer

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Politics, funding, and doubts aside - how nice was it to see the doors fully open on the Vehicle Assembly Building and have a very tall rocket roll out? Seeing the X-1 on launch pad 39B really gives you a sense of how tall this thing is.

I'm hoping for a successful test flight.
 
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MeteorWayne

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There will be a Preflight Briefing on NASA TV after the Flight Readiness Review (FRR) around 5 PM EDT this Friday Oct 23rd.
 
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Swampcat

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bluegrassgazer":1ghkbn8j said:
Politics, funding, and doubts aside - how nice was it to see the doors fully open on the Vehicle Assembly Building and have a very tall rocket roll out? Seeing the X-1 on launch pad 39B really gives you a sense of how tall this thing is.

I'm hoping for a successful test flight.
Absolutely.

I would never diss the folks who actually do the work they are told to do. They do it well and I wish them a successful flight.
 
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Molodei

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You speak about the launch of Ares like about a picknick. I surprised. Great project, greate tasks. You gives each 5 USD personnally to take the NASA live... We haven*t so programme but we hope for your help. Dont*t think that there are the beers in Russia wich are building the cosmic rockets. We have a small contakt with you so we can*t take part in the simular programms.
In the other case we have an equal specialists which may sit without job. Don*t you think its a problem ? We have a gemorroj to make our sistem of aducation be the same like yours, And so what do we have ??? Outstanding, seeing your braveness and proudness. It isn*t honestly. Let*s make the future together if you want to have the simular standarts.. :geek:
 
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Eman_3

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radarredux":sxhylqow said:
Eman_3":sxhylqow said:
This launch reeks of politics. Sadly, but that's just how business is done these days. NASA cannot afford a disaster, but it also has to demonstrate to everyone that the Aries program is moving forward. ... Despite this, there are still countless new components and systems that have to prove themselves during this upcoming flight. It's a worthwhile mission, and regardless of the outcome, valuable data will be collected.
Schizophrenic? ;)

I think this launch has been in the pipeline almost since the beginning and well before the HSF committee and current doubts about the future of Constellation. Its good to fly hardware from time to time and compare the results to your predictions.

Also, this is one big Estes rocket! :D While the 4-segment SRBs have flown attached to a shuttle, I'm not familiar with an SRM this big flying stand-alone before. Anyone have some knowledge on this?

You took my quote, included the beginning and end, yet removed the middle part. I do not wish to be taken out of context, and object to your actions.
 
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Swampcat

Guest
My contact at NASA has offered me a pass to go with him to KSC for the Ares I-X launch if I can get down there :cool:

Would anyone like to donate funds to get me to Florida? :shock:

:lol:
 
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bdewoody

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I live nearby (Orlando) and I plan to go over to the Cape to watch this one, as I have many of the shuttle launches. I hope the launch is a complete success regardless of the political issues. I will be glad when private business sees the profit to be had by putting people on the moon and other places in the solar system and NASA gets back to it's primary mission of breaking new ground and not just ways of doing what has already been done before.
 
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job1207

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All but one of the Shuttle SRBs flew just fine. This rocket will be fine. The main ?s were whether human and upper stage hardware, would survive a launch. You would think that whatever is sent up will survive. This is NASA, they know how to launch an SRB.
 
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MeteorWayne

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Just a reminder there's a post FRR News Coneference scheduled for ~ 5PM EDT this evening on NASA TV.
 
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ms1

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CommonMan":95ql6s3h said:
Oct 27, is my birthday, I’m not superstitious but if it crashes does that mean I will have bad luck? Someone I know is trying to give me that BS.

It's my birthday too... and I have a front row seat for the launch. I recently moved to Titusville, directly on the Indian River due east of the VAB and launch pads.

Let's just hope that it at least heads up and east. A crash to the West would ruin my birthday.

Seriously, let's all hope for a complete success. The economy of this area, not to mention most of my neighbors, is heavily dependent on NASA's continued success.

If any of you make it to the area for the launch, I recomend a restaurant called "your place" on US 1 for breakfast. Great food (OK, sometimes grease is good), but the kicker is the autographed pics of Apollo crews that are nailed to the wall in the far back booth area. Faded... but understandable, as I'm sure they have hung there for 40 years!
 
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gibpyx

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I hope we go forward with the orion/ares project by NASA. It gives jobs to thousands of people and is
a source of pride for americans. It only needs 1-2 billion a year to remain on schedule.....perhaps we should
all send $5. to Nasa to keep it going. I am ashamed of the fact that we have 100 B2 bombers at 10 billion a shot,
not to mention maintenance, and can't get this puny capsule off the ground and to the moon. I think all
americans should be very embarassed by whats happening! Chicago USA....Nessia
 
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thermionic

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Nothing new to say other then that I'm thrilled about this launch. Proving the avionics & stability of Ares1 will be a real shot in the arm for the program. Good luck to the team!

With Ares1X, a shuttle, X37, and the nuclear levitation test vehicle all gearing up at the Cape, as well as a fully staffed ISS rolling around up in Heaven, it's a really exciting time for our space program. And we've got a Falcon9 launch soon, SS2 rolling out in December for taxi tests. Things are cooking! /jd
 
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newtons_laws

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thermionic":3jijxgwc said:
With Ares1X, a shuttle, X37, and the nuclear levitation test vehicle all gearing up at the Cape, as well as a fully staffed ISS rolling around up in Heaven, it's a really exciting time for our space program. And we've got a Falcon9 launch soon, SS2 rolling out in December for taxi tests. Things are cooking! /jd
What's the "nuclear levitation test vehicle" you refer to?
 
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docm

Guest
Sounds like he's talking about the magnetic levitation tests taking place at some NASA labs.

No, it's not in relation to a vehicle :roll:

The water molecules in living things are polar, meaning they have weak charges at either end. This makes them slightly magnetic. It's been found that if you put said living things in a strong magnetic field they'll levitate, and this levitation appears not to have a deleterious affect on the organisms under test.

This is called diamagnetism and other materials also exhibit the effect, even pyrolytic carbon sheets which the last I checked are the strongest room-temperature diamagnetic material.

So far they've levitated frogs and mice, so people are a long ways off. The frog was levitated using a 10 Tesla field at first - about 3x what's used for most medical MRI's. IIRC the efficiency has improved somewhat since then. Video below....

How to leverage this? Near term if you had a strong enough magnet how about on-ground microgravity research on polar materials, small critters & plants and, much later, training. Lot's cheaper than a flight to ISS and it can be sustained for weeks or months, which is better than short rides on the vomit comet.

Speculating further; compact super-high intensity magnets (ie: high-temp superconducting) could provide magnetic "gravity" or even an artificial magnetosphere for spacecraft.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1vyB-O5i6E[/youtube]
 
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MeteorWayne

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{Wayne briefly dons mod hat}
Just a reminder folks, this forum is Missions and Launches, so let's try and stick to the upcoming launch. The levitation thing is an interesting subject, but probably belongs in Space Business and Technology or Physics.
 
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thermionic

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Sorry, I just made that up about the nuclear levitation thing. ms1's observation of unexplained activity (probably falcon9?) at the Cape seemed a perfect lead in to get some rumors going. I'm going to get myself banned one of these days...

Any ways, I'll be watching NASA TV with great enthusiam on Tuesday. /jd
 
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newtons_laws

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Thermionic
Just when I thought Nasa were about to try their first warp drive! :lol:

Getting back to reality and the Ares 1X launch, it'll be interesting to see what vibration levels (and their frequencies) are measured in the dummy capsule at the top of the stack. The Ares 1 design will be the first time a launcher intended to carry crew has an entirely solid fuelled first stage, and it's my understanding that these typically produce a more variable thrust level (and hence more vibration).
 
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MeteorWayne

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That's certainly one of the major goals of this test.

BTW, the weather is only 40% go for the Tuesday launch time, 60% go on Wednesday and Thursday.
 
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MarkStanaway

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I found this interesting titbit about the upcomming Ares 1-X vehicle:
'Joe Oliva, ATK's project manager for Ares 1-X, said the stage was cast with solid propellant eight years ago and its shuttle-ready lifetime of five years has expired.
Solid-fueled motors on nuclear missiles are designed to stay ready for launch for decades, but NASA's requirement for shuttle flights dictates boosters must be used within five years after propellant is loaded.

When it became apparent this booster could not fly on a shuttle mission, the program handed control of the reusable motor to the Constellation program for the Ares 1-X flight.

"One became available at that time, and all we were going to do was actually take it back and wash out the propellant," Oliva said.'
Source http://www.spaceflightnow.com/ares1x/091025risk/
 
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