Black Hole Gamma Rays

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Rezgrats

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<p>Hello,</p><p>With regard to black holes, everytime I see an illustration of a black hole it has this beam shooting out of it.&nbsp; If I'm not mistaken, that beam is made of Gamma Rays.&nbsp; (if not, please let me know that too).&nbsp; Anyway, everytime you talk about black holes you hear the standard phrase "nothing can escape the power of a black hole..."&nbsp; Well, if that is the case, then how do the Gamma Rays escape?</p><p>&nbsp;Thanks,</p><p>Mark</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hello,With regard to black holes, everytime I see an illustration of a black hole it has this beam shooting out of it.&nbsp; If I'm not mistaken, that beam is made of Gamma Rays.&nbsp; (if not, please let me know that too).&nbsp; Anyway, everytime you talk about black holes you hear the standard phrase "nothing can escape the power of a black hole..."&nbsp; Well, if that is the case, then how do the Gamma Rays escape?&nbsp;Thanks,Mark&nbsp; <br />Posted by Rezgrats</DIV><br /><br />Because the jet is created outside of the black hole event horizon. As matter spirals in, it is deflected from getting close enough to the balck hole to be absorbed, and instead is shot out away from the object along the axis of rotation. Remember, a black hole has no more gravity than any other similar mass. Unless you get too close, all kind of mechanisms can transfer matter from the disk to a polar aligned jet. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hello,With regard to black holes, everytime I see an illustration of a black hole it has this beam shooting out of it.&nbsp; If I'm not mistaken, that beam is made of Gamma Rays.&nbsp; (if not, please let me know that too).&nbsp; Anyway, everytime you talk about black holes you hear the standard phrase "nothing can escape the power of a black hole..."&nbsp; Well, if that is the case, then how do the Gamma Rays escape?&nbsp;Thanks,Mark&nbsp; <br /> Posted by Rezgrats</DIV></p><p>The mechanisms depend on what you are talking about.&nbsp; </p><p>Are you referring to gamma ray bursts from core collapse supernovae that leave a stellar remnant in the form of a black hole?&nbsp; </p><p>Or, are you referring to the x-ray jets that are created by accretion disks around black holes and nuetron stars?&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>In either case, MeteorWayne is correct in stating that they are not originating from within the event horizon.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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Rezgrats

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The mechanisms depend on what you are talking about.&nbsp; Are you referring to gamma ray bursts from core collapse supernovae that leave a stellar remnant in the form of a black hole?&nbsp; Or, are you referring to the x-ray jets that are created by accretion disks around black holes and nuetron stars?&nbsp;&nbsp;In either case, MeteorWayne is correct in stating that they are not originating from within the event horizon.&nbsp; <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV><br /></p><p>Hi guys, thanks for the answers.&nbsp; I consider myself schooled.</p><p>&nbsp;Take care</p>
 
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