Black Holes - Can interstellar gas and dust survive being captured by an accretion disc

May 30, 2024
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Question.

Can gases and dusts captured by black hole accretion discs survive being captured and subsequently removed from the disc via relativistic jets?

This may be possible if not all of the accretion disc gets superheated to very high temperatures.

If so , then black holes could act to distribute the gases and dusts throughout the surrounding cosmos during their life, in addition to during the supernova which created the black hole.
 
What surprises me is that if this galaxy is so old, why do we still have so much primordial matter left in it. This MW is filthy with dust and debris. It hides most of our view of it. It should be all cleared up by now. Eons of gravity and sweeps of gravity.

Either there is a huge mis-understanding of our MW, or it has had a violent past. Is this dust being added or cleared away?

What really surprised me was all these photos in range of 1 or 2 thousand light years. OUR backyard......and how much dust is just here locally, imagine the amount for the whole MW.

The amount is much greater than talked about. It's everywhere.
 
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May 30, 2024
4
0
10
Visit site
What surprises me is that if this galaxy is so old, why do we still have so much primordial matter left in it. This MW is filthy with dust and debris. It hides most of our view of it. It should be all cleared up by now. Eons of gravity and sweeps of gravity.

Either there is a huge mis-understanding of our MW, or it has had a violent past. Is this dust being added or cleared away?

What really surprised me was all these photos in range of 1 or 2 thousand light years. OUR backyard......and how much dust is just here locally, imagine the amount for the whole MW.

The amount is much greater than talked about. It's everywhere.
If , in the interests of science, an attempt was made to characterise the dust, then because it either lacks the properties to reflect light from adjacent stars, or perhaps, there are no adjacent stars then the dust would be described as "dark".

Similarly, without any insight provided by reflected light the dust might only be able to be described generically as "matter".

Thus, could it be that space dust is the elusive dark matter.

If dark matter's only known characteristics are that it cannot be seen by telescopes but its presence is inferred by the motion of galaxies , then why not humble space dust.

Of course, there would have to be a lot of it, but since it cannot be seen then the quantity is unknown.
 
May 30, 2024
4
0
10
Visit site
If , in the interests of science, an attempt was made to characterise the dust, then because it either lacks the properties to reflect light from adjacent stars, or perhaps, there are no adjacent stars then the dust would be described as "dark".

Similarly, without any insight provided by reflected light the dust might only be able to be described generically as "matter".

Thus, could it be that space dust is the elusive dark matter.

If dark matter's only known characteristics are that it cannot be seen by telescopes but its presence is inferred by the motion of galaxies , then why not humble space dust.

Of course, there would have to be a lot of it, but since it cannot be seen then the quantity is unknown.