Bondic and Lunar Structural Support Beams

Dwight Huth

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https://notaglue.com/

This new bonding system isn't a glue, its plastic that uses UV light to cure the material.

Here are a few videos.

https://notaglue.com/pages/show-me-how

Bonic when used in space exploration, such as building structures could help reduce the material cost of building structures. Since there is less gravity in space pulling on the molecular structure of the metal material, less metal could be used that would be replaced by a Bondic layer.

Since metals have tiny pores that can be seen with a special microscope, the Bondic layer would fill in the pores when the aluminum has a Bondic layer applied. While the tubing is being rolled across a film of Bondic, UV light is applied to cure the Bondic to the aluminum.

When two layers of metal alloy are placed against each, the pores in the surface of each sheet of metal decrease the overall structural strength of the two sheets of metal, thus creating material fatigue where fractures occur. Machining the surfaces to a fine finish to reduce porosity takes a lot of money.

But when a Bondic Layer is placed between both sheets and then cured, a third layer, the Bondic layer increases the structural integrity of the surfaces of the two steel sheets being fastened together. The only problem is that the two metals being joined would need to have a transparent section in order to use the UV light on.

Instead of hauling tons of components to the Moon that takes up a lot of space, Bondic could instead be taken instead.


Instead of carrying 100 beams used to create structural support, five beam molds would be carried along with Bondic that would take up less space in the cargo bay. Once on the Moon the transparent beam mold would be filled with Bondic. The circular UV welder is then moved up the beam mold curing the Bondic into a structural support beam. The difficult part is creating a mold than could be used over and over again and would not bond to the beam being created. But with a little development Bondic would work. Instead of transporting 25 curved structural beams to the Moon that would be used for the 'roof' of a facility, Two or three curved structural beams plus a whole lot of Bondic could be taken instead. With Bondic molds already on the Moon the only material that would need to be transported to the Moon would Bondic. To use a Bondic structure outside of the facility would be easy. Simply mix the UV blocking paint with the Bondic being molding the structural support then apply a second layer of material wrapping to further block the UV light.

If structural metals are still preferred, then Bondic would be used to reduce the overall weight of the traditional metal by applying several layers of Bondic to the outside of the traditional metal beam. The structural beam would still retain the weight bearing loads necessary to support a roof or ceiling made of entirely of Bondic panels and beams.


The applications for fiber optics would also be greatly increased, that is if the Bondic structure can be developed to allow light and current to pass through the Bondic Fiber without melting. If Bondic can be used to create a computer processing core without melting, then layer upon layer of computer cores could created


How does Bondic look to be used to create windows?
 
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Jan 6, 2020
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Bondic is a form of glue, intended to bond two surfaces together. It is relatively soft plastic. There is no information regarding the structural strength of Bondic, and it is highly unlikely that any structural members could be created with it. It is virtually certain that it would be far weaker than steel or aluminum.
The weight of that much Bondic would exceed the weight of conventional building materials, and the cost would be several hundred times more.

Bondic does not have the optical properties necessary for fiber optics.

Bondic creates bonds that may not last long enough for the reliability needed in any aerospace project or job.
 
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Dwight Huth

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Bondic is a form of glue, intended to bond two surfaces together. It is relatively soft plastic. There is no information regarding the structural strength of Bondic, and it is highly unlikely that any structural members could be created with it. It is virtually certain that it would be far weaker than steel or aluminum.
The weight of that much Bondic would exceed the weight of conventional building materials, and the cost would be several hundred times more.

Bondic does not have the optical properties necessary for fiber optics.

Bondic creates bonds that may not last long enough for the reliability needed in any aerospace project or job.
First off, you are not Space Force.

Bondic is not a glue. Bondic is a liquid plastic that is cured with UV light.

The fact that Bondic would take up less space in a cargo hold compared to full length structural components means that more smaller diameter sized tubing could be transported to a Lunar site. Bondic is then applied to the tubing to add additional overall diameters to the tubing that increases the structural load bearing of the the tubing overall compared to the original diameter of the tubing.
 
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First off, you are not Space Force.
Actually, I am. You even quoted me, Space Force, in your reply.
Bondic is not a glue. Bondic is a liquid plastic that is cured with UV light.
“INCREDIBLE ADHESIVE” (from a Bondic sales ad)
Adhesive, also known as glue, cement, mucilage, or paste, is any non metallic substance applied to one or both surfaces of two separate items that binds them together and resists their separation.
Bondic is a form of glue, an adhesive, intended to bond two surfaces together. That is what adhesives do. That is how it was used in dentistry, as a UV cured glue.
The fact that Bondic would take up less space in a cargo hold compared to full length structural components means that more smaller diameter sized tubing could be transported to a Lunar site. Bondic is then applied to the tubing to add additional overall diameters to the tubing that increases the structural load bearing of the the tubing overall compared to the original diameter of the tubing.
Please provide the structural strength specifications when used in that manner. Not guesses or claims, but verified specifications. I will then provide the structural strength specifications for steel, aluminum, titanium, and other structural materials.
 
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First off, you are not Space Force.

Bondic is not a glue. Bondic is a liquid plastic that is cured with UV light.

The fact that Bondic would take up less space in a cargo hold compared to full length structural components means that more smaller diameter sized tubing could be transported to a Lunar site. Bondic is then applied to the tubing to add additional overall diameters to the tubing that increases the structural load bearing of the the tubing overall compared to the original diameter of the tubing.
The material you are referring to appears to be either a glue or an epoxy. Such materials are not truly new. The ancient Greeks were familiar with linseed oils and resins from tree saps and in fact used them to make armor. Linen cloth layers laminated with lacquer formed a fine suit of armor for Alexander the Great.
This particular plastic is cured by exposure to UV light. But curing is not a new thing either.
For use on the Moon, the volume of the material is less important than is the mass (weight). Rockets are expensive, and lift to even low orbit takes quite a lot of fuel. Lift to the moon takes about half again that. SpaceX's Falcon Nine rocket can get a few tons to LEO, but it takes a Falcon Heavy, three times the rocket, to get the same weight to the Moon. Landing on the Moon would take then half of that cargo weight as more rocket fuel.
For actual useful cargo weight, NASA is building something that even exceeds the Saturn V. Those each cost about a Billion Dollars. The SLS Artemus, when built will most likely cost close to two Billion apiece. It's simply what it takes to do the job.
The expense of that lift is why governments and private entities are seriously considering using 'in situ resources'.
If the energy supplies can be sufficient, then operating a small metal refinery on the Moon would be how the actual Lunar facilities would be built. Large facilities would then be built of steel or aluminum, both of which the Moon has a lot of.
The EU and NASA are giving serious consideration right now to crude ceramics. It seems that microwaves can be used to sinter (semi-melt) lunar regolith into a porous rock-like material which can be 3D printed for walls of shelters and so forth. Those walls would then have additional dust and gravel piled on top. This pile would provide meteor and radiation protection and as loose dust and gravel wouldn't shatter when struck.
If a strong and lightweight structure is desired for other shapes, then the material of choice would be a composite, such as fiber glass, carbon composite or some such. The laminate might then be the material you suggested, if it conforms to the other requirements.
The ideal base material would be a liquid or near liquid gel with very low out-gassing while it cured into a rubber or plastic layer which would bind the fibers that give the material its actual strengh.
I have no data on the actual behavior of your Bondic (tm) under vacuum conditions or at the extreme temperatures common on the moon. There would need to be laboratory testing for those conditions before any serious consideration could be given.
 
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