Bright Comet swallowed by the sun!

Status
Not open for further replies.
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
<p>From SOHO:</p><p>(These are large, high speed connection only)</p><p>&nbsp;http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/LATEST/current_c3.gif</p><p>http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/LATEST/current_c2.gif</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>c3 is the wider field of view, c2 closer.</p><p>The sun's disk is the size of the circle in the center, behind the occulting disk.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
M

michaelmozina

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>From SOHO:(These are large, high speed connection only)&nbsp;http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/LATEST/current_c3.gifhttp://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/LATEST/current_c2.gifc3 is the wider field of view, c2 closer.The sun's disk is the size of the circle in the center, behind the occulting disk. <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>These links will be faster if your connection speed is limited, but keep in mind they are a little bit "distorted" compared to the actual GIF images in the links MW provided. </p><p>http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/LATEST/current_c3.mpg</p><p>http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/LATEST/current_c2.mpg</p><p>I noticed that there seemed to be some CME action associated with aftermath of that particular "impact" (if you can really call it that).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>The only thing about spotting those kind of comets in SOHO images is that most of them are destroyed in the process of getting that close the the sun, and there is no point in giving them names. :)&nbsp; <br /> </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I noticed that there seemed to be some CME action associated with aftermath of that particular "impact" (if you can really call it that).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The only thing about spotting those kind of comets in SOHO images is that most of them are destroyed in the process of getting that close the the sun, and there is no point in giving them names. :)&nbsp; <br />Posted by michaelmozina</DIV></p><p>That could be coincidence as well (CME). </p><p>Yes the comets do evaporate, but they are given official discovery designations.</p><p>I'll see if I can find out what that was for this (former) comet<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I noticed that there seemed to be some CME action associated with aftermath of that particular "impact" (if you can really call it that).&nbsp;&nbsp;Posted by michaelmozina</DIV><br /><br />I went back and looked closely and saw no evidence of that at all. All I did see was the comet's tail lasted about halfway around the sun until the nucleus evaporated. What did you see that suggested CME activity??? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
M

michaelmozina

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>That could be coincidence as well (CME). Yes the comets do evaporate, but they are given official discovery designations.I'll see if I can find out what that was for this (former) comet <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>While coincidences cannot be ruled out, if you look at the C2 images in slow motion, you'll notice that the CME seems to pass right through the tail of the disintegrating comet.&nbsp; I'm sure that the electric comet proponents would find it hard to believe that these events, and this alignment of the tail and the CME were purely a coincidence, but I guess we can't rule that out completely.&nbsp; Based on the position of the tail and CME front, it seems more likely to me that the disintegration of the comet must have had something to do with that specific CME event.&nbsp; Since CME's happen all the time in the absense of comet activity however, there's no way to completely rule out it being a coinsidence entirely.&nbsp; IMO however, the timing of the CME event and the position of the tail at thet specific moment seems to suggest some sort of connection between the two events.</p><p>Is there a database of Lasco images that you know of that are specifically linked to comet activty, or would I have to look these comet impact events up by date and then go through the raw archives? &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It's an interesting phenomenon that might merit a bit of time on my part.&nbsp; I'm pretty curious by nature and that sequence of events looks very intrigiung, at least at first glance.&nbsp; I'd want to see a few more of these comet swallowing events before drawing any conclusions however. </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
M

michaelmozina

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I went back and looked closely and saw no evidence of that at all. All I did see was the comet's tail lasted about halfway around the sun until the nucleus evaporated. What did you see that suggested CME activity??? <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>I found it easier to spot the front of the CME in the C3 images first.&nbsp; If you then look at the C2 images, you can see where the wave front of the CME seems to travel right through the tail of the CME.&nbsp;&nbsp; I haven'g gone through the GIF 's yet to isolate a single image that I think shows this alignment, but I'll try to do that later today when I have some time so you can see what I mean.&nbsp; Since Lasco is a monocular system, I can't really be sure if all the axis are aligned from just the Lasco images alone, so this presumed alignment could in fact be an optical illusion of some sort.&nbsp; I'll have to look at the STEREO images to see what they show.</p><p>Do you know if there is a database of LASCO images that are related to cometary breakups, or would I have to look up the comet events by date and then go through the main archives?&nbsp;&nbsp; It seems like a worthwhile thing to explore when I have some time, and I would hate to draw any conclusions from a few images of only a single event.&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
<p>I'll answer your other questions in my next reply. There are many compilations at the SOHO site.</p><p>To the current <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" />&nbsp;topic.</p><p>I've watched the c3 and c2 loops several dozen times. Not that that was hard to do...what beautiful images!</p><p>I certainly see a mass ejection. My occamated view is that it is the mass of the comet's tail being swept out by the solar wind. I see no evidence that it is a CME (Coronal Mass Ejection). In fact, if you watch before and after the comet, the basic pattern remains unchanged before and after the comet tail is ejected. That reflects the mass flow out of the sun.</p><p>Also, remember that the LASCO is in the optical band, where dust shows up very bright. Think of how bright the tiny (probably 20 meter?) nucleus was.</p><p>Finally, if you look at the other EIT bands, there is&nbsp;no evidence of a surface disturbance that I've been able to see. However, that will take some serious crunching. Unfortunately this event occurred right after a CCD bakeout, so there are missing days, and the first images are the ones of interest. Hard to process visually. I'm digging through the daily MPEG files to get a closer look.</p><p>MW</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
M

michaelmozina

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'll answer your other questions in my next reply. There are many compilations at the SOHO site.To the current &nbsp;topic.I've watched the c3 and c2 loops several dozen times. Not that that was hard to do...what beautiful images!I certainly see a mass ejection. My occamated view is that it is the mass of the comet's tail being swept out by the solar wind. I see no evidence that it is a CME (Coronal Mass Ejection). </DIV></p><p>You are right about that point, and I didn't pay close enough attention to that in the first go round.&nbsp; After rerunning these sequences again and focusing on that issue specifically, I tend to agree with you that there doesn't seem to be a direct effect on the tail.&nbsp; That also suggests to me that it may be more optical illusion than direct alignment.&nbsp; I think you're probably right.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><br /><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
M

michaelmozina

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If you look at the other EIT bands, there is&nbsp;no evidence of a surface disturbance that I've been able to see. However, that will take some serious crunching. Unfortunately this event occurred right after a CCD bakeout, so there are missing days, and the first images are the ones of interest. Hard to process visually. I'm digging through the daily MPEG files to get a closer look.MW&nbsp; <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>From my perspective the EIT alignments may not be particularly obvious except perhaps at the moment directly preceeding the explosive plasma wave phase (in other words you might see a concentrated discharge event), but a significant part of the tail should have been blown out with the CME particles as you suggest even by my non-standard way of thinking, assuming there was any sort of actual alignment.&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY