Dual Mode Propulsion

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Space_Jobs

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<p>I have recently been asked to supply a Dual Mode Propulsion engineering BUT this is not as simple as at first thought...</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Firstly can anyone help me understand this technology and how it differs from normal proplusion systems? </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>also...&nbsp; the obvious question... Where can i find such an engineer?</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Thanks</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Ian</p>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I have recently been asked to supply a Dual Mode Propulsion engineering BUT this is not as simple as at first thought...&nbsp;Firstly can anyone help me understand this technology and how it differs from normal proplusion systems? &nbsp;also...&nbsp; the obvious question... Where can i find such an engineer?&nbsp;Thanks&nbsp;Ian <br />Posted by Space_Jobs</DIV></p><p>The only dual mode engine of which I am aware, that has actually been used, is the engine on the SR-71 blackbird.&nbsp; It operates as a normal jet in one mode and as a ramjet at high velocity.</p><p>There were some thoughts on such technology a couple of years ago relating to a single-stage to orbit concept that would use multi-mode propulsion.&nbsp; I don't think any hardware was built before the study contracts were canceled.&nbsp; That would have been something along the lines of a single engine that could operate as a jet, ramjet, scramjet, and rocket.</p><p>I doubt that you will find any engineer who can claim to be an experienced specialist in the area, since there is really no area.&nbsp; But you might find someone who has at least looked at concepts for such and engine and has done studies.&nbsp; But there won't be many of them.&nbsp; You might try doing a literature search, probably related to AIAA or JANNAF papers, and then contact the authors.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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docm

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<p>P&W/Rocketdyne did an extended set of tests on a subscale<font size="2"><font face="arial"> </font></font>FaCET dual mode last year as part of the DARPA/AFRL (and just about everyone else!) Falcon BlackSwift project, which is very much alive. </p><p>BlackSwift looks to be the deep strike UCAV from Hell. </p><p>Aviation Week story (July 24, 2008).... </p><p>Wired story on its $750 million budget for 2009....</p><p>Allleged model</p><p><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/3/7/b31eb22f-154b-46d8-8742-eec7262b8d9b.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br />&nbsp;</p><p>Aviation Week article....</p><p><strong>Quote:&nbsp;</strong></p><p>Boeing and ATK have joined the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works team bidding to build the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Blackswift hypersonic technology demonstrator.</p> <p>Northrop Grumman is understood not to have bid, making it likely a contract will be awarded to Lockheed by September. The unmanned, reusable turbojet/scramjet-powered Blackswift is planned to fly in 2012.</p> <p>Under DARPA's Falcon program, Lockheed has completed conceptual design of a demonstrator, the HTV-3X, that forms the basis for the Blackswift. The goal of the demonstration is to take-off conventionally, accelerate to beyond Mach 6, maneuver and return to a runway landing.</p> <p>Skunk Works also is performing subscale tests of the combined-cycle propulsion system, which comprises a high-Mach turbojet and dual-mode ram/scramjet. The turbine is used for take-off and landing, and to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 4, where the ramjet takes over.</p> <p>Lockheed has ground-tested inlets and nozzles that are shared by the two engines, says Stephen Walker, deputy director of DARPA's Tactical Technology Office. The challenge is in combining both flowpaths over the Mach range during which both the turbine and ramjet are operating, he says.</p> <p>DARPA is not discussing Blackswift because it is in source selection, but it will now be a joint program with the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Walker told the AIAA Joint Propulsion Conference here.</p> <p>The Blackswift will use a round-combustor dual-mode ramjet under development by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. Both Rolls-Royce and Williams International are developing candidates for the 13-inch diameter high-Mach turbine.</p> <p>Walker will not comment on the number of engines that will power the Blackswift, which will be slightly larger than the Have Blue demonstrator that preceded the F-117 stealth fighter.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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