Earth's core is a billion years old

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Interesting report indicating the *Earth's present core* must be very young compared to the age of the solar system.

See 'The age of the Solar System redefined by the oldest Pb-Pb age of a meteoritic inclusion', https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NatGe...3..637B/abstract, Sep-2010. Meteorite ages with dust grains showing 4.568E+9 years old radiometric years. Also the foundation work of Clair Patterson, 'Age of meteorites and the earth', https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1956GeCoA..10..230P/abstract, Oct-1956.

Quite a time interval to cover here from tiny dust grains in the solar nebula 4.568E+9 years old to 1E+9 years old, present Earth's core. Many events too, e.g. giant impact with Theia and origin of the proto-Earth's core.
 
Jan 4, 2020
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It's the inner, solid core that may be that young - and the 2015 and this paper together makes a good case for such a thermally simple model - but the initial liquid core is, according to radioisotope models about 80 Myrs (IIRC). The iron-nickel liquid droplet trickled down with or without the Moon forming impact at about 50 Myrs helping - since even a small body as the Moon has a similar core - and apart from the inner solid core they now remain as the liquid outer core which makes up the geodynamo engine.
 
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Sep 9, 2020
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It's the inner, solid core that may be that young - and the 2015 and this paper together makes a good case for such a thermally simple model - but the initial liquid core is, according to radioisotope models about 80 Myrs (IIRC). The iron-nickel liquid droplet trickled down with or without the Moon forming impact at about 50 Myrs helping - since even a small body as the Moon has a similar core - and apart from the inner solid core they now remain as the liquid outer core which makes up the geodynamo engine.
I understood the same.
 

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