ExoMars delayed

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MeteorWayne

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<table border="0"><tbody><tr><td width="355" align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="3" color="#1b4872"><strong>ESA to Delay Mars Rover Mission </strong><br /><font face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="1" color="#333333"><strong>By Peter B. de Selding</strong><br />Space News Staff Writer<br /></font></font><font face="arial,helvetica" size="1" color="#330066">posted: 17 October 2008<br />02:11 pm ET</font><br />
 
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3488

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<p><font size="2"><strong>Hi Wayne,</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>It's great that ESA is seeking further co-operation with NASA & Russia for a 2016 launch with them, but this also seems quite petty in the respect some governments are arguing over a paltry sum. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Europe is not poor, true there are fanancial problems for sure, but when one thinks of what the governments in the countries within the ESA (Britain included), this seems sad & pathetic.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>At least ExoMars has not been cancelled.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi Wayne,It's great that ESA is seeking further co-operation with NASA & Russia for a 2016 launch with them, but this also seems quite petty in the respect some governments are arguing over a paltry sum. Europe is not poor, true there are fanancial problems for sure, but when one thinks of what the governments in the countries within the ESA (Britain included), this seems sad & pathetic.At least ExoMars has not been cancelled.Andrew Brown.&nbsp; <br />Posted by 3488</DIV><br /><br />Yes indeed, better to be delayed than have to be a Phoenix :) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><font size="2"><strong><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'></strong><font color="#ff0000">Yes indeed, better to be delayed than have to be a Phoenix :) <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</font><strong></DIV></strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Yeah, I've been there & done that, so know all about it. At least by the looks of it, there is no cancellation this time, so do not have to engage in campaigns to save the mission. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Been involved with three to date, not sure if I can handle many more now, particularly as my health is getting a little ropier these days, but think I've still got some fight in me. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>It's hard work & quite thankless at times, as yuo are having to deal with people more interested in finance & their own short term agendas, than science, but the campaigns I was involved in, all were successful, all three missions have gone ahead although I consider New Horizons as only a partial success as only one was launched, but the second never happened.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>I would rather be talking about potential landing sites on Mars & possible science returns from ExoMars, but instead wonder about it being delayed & maybe axed if 'costs' cannot remain within a very narrow margin.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>It's a tragic shame Wayne, it really is.&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>Better than cancellation and better than rushing and sending it off half ready.</p><p>Note that this is the improved version of ExoMars, which is much more sophisticated, capable, and therefore more&nbsp;complex and expensive.</p><p>The delay means that there will be more&nbsp;time in incorporate MSL operational and instrument&nbsp;lessons into the design, as well as the site selection.</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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h2ouniverse

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Better than cancellation and better than rushing and sending it off half ready.Note that this is the improved version of ExoMars, which is much more sophisticated, capable, and therefore more&nbsp;complex and expensive.The delay means that there will be more&nbsp;time in incorporate MSL operational and instrument&nbsp;lessons into the design, as well as the site selection.Jon <br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV><br /><br />Also please note that this is consistent with a delay of MSR after 2020.</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Also please note that this is consistent with a delay of MSR after 2020.&nbsp; <br />Posted by h2ouniverse</DIV></p><p>Maybe the idea of ExoMars collecting a cache for MSR is stillin the running?<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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h2ouniverse

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Maybe the idea of ExoMars collecting a cache for MSR is stillin the running? <br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV><br /><br />That would reinforce it by reducing the time between both missions. Howvever the astrobio value might be reduced if the storage time is too high.</p><p>Also, if the ExoMars-upgraded mission survives, there can be a carrier-orbiter instead of the current brainless carrier (for few tens of million euros more). In that case the carrier that brings the entry Module with Rover would remain in orbit around Mars for avery long time.</p><p>Some have suggested that this Orbiter could be life-designed for 10 to 15 years and act as a comm relay for MSR.</p><p>&nbsp;Best regards.</p>
 
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aphh

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I think I'm starting to see a pattern here with these governments and agencies. These days everything takes atleast 10 years and costs atleast a billion. <br />
 
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