Gravitational waves reveal black hole and neutron star merging for 1st time

could this be a dark matter body? I've seen no comments on this material that supposedly has gravity, but can't ignite like a star (no hydrogen to fuse). Where are the dark matter black holes? Simple question from a chemist.
 
could this be a dark matter body? I've seen no comments on this material that supposedly has gravity, but can't ignite like a star (no hydrogen to fuse). Where are the dark matter black holes? Simple question from a chemist.
A black hole can be made of anything with mass, which includes matter and energy. We would not know if it was regular matter, Dark Matter, energy, who knows. Can't tell anything about a BH except mass, spin and charge.
 
Maybe one of these bodies was itself a product of two merged neutron stars.

Is it possible to have an object's interior be barely a black hole and the exterior still manages to be a neutron star?
 
It is possible to have a shell with a tiny black hole floating around inside. Inside a symmetrical shell anything floats at zero g. We can't let the black hole too near the shell or it would destroy the whole scenario.
 
A promising putative start into the mass gap range.

could this be a dark matter body? I've seen no comments on this material that supposedly has gravity, but can't ignite like a star (no hydrogen to fuse). Where are the dark matter black holes? Simple question from a chemist.
Yes, but black holes form as dense, collapsed objects and since dark matter gas clumps do not form EM bonds or even radiate much they do not easily collapse.

It is unlikely to happen even before normal matter clumped, people have looked after the putatively rare primordial black holes but not seen any.

Maybe one of these bodies was itself a product of two merged neutron stars.

Is it possible to have an object's interior be barely a black hole and the exterior still manages to be a neutron star?
Yes, neutron star mergers is one posed pathway for how the mass gap objects can form.

There is a small chance that stars have denser dark matter in their cores than their surroundings simply from gravitational sorting, the normal matter gas could help when the dark matter itself has problems collapsing.

[E.g. "Neutron Stars Could be Heating Up From Dark Matter Annihilation":
The details depend on which specific dark matter model you use. Rather than addressing variant models, the team looked at broad properties. Specifically, they focused on how dark matter and baryons (protons and neutrons) might interact, and whether that would cause dark matter to be trapped. Sure enough, for the range of possible baryon-dark matter interactions, neutron stars can capture dark matter.
https://www.universetoday.com/16662...-be-heating-up-from-dark-matter-annihilation/]

Dark matter by itself has problems form collapsed objects. So current most massive neutron star equation of states prefer a quark-gluon matter core right before they collapse into black holes.

I don't think anyone has developed models with a smidgen dark matter, it is a very complex issue anyway. But it would be a nice problem; does dark matter help core collapse?
 
Last edited: