gravity

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186Kmps

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Does anyone know why the ISS isnt being engineered/designed to support artificial gravity? Is 0-g simply more cost effective, or are there other substantial factors? Seems like the doughnut shape or a large enough cylindrical structure w/ a proper and stabilized rotation would easily produce any intensity level of gravity required.
 
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MeteorWayne

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Welcome to Space.com.

For one thing, the ISS was engineered decades ago.

So there is no future engineering/designing.
 
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aphh

Guest
To be useful the radius of a rotating structure needs to be very large, 500 meters atleast. Rotations per minute must not exceed certain very low number not to introduce too much unwanted and uncomfortable acceleration. For certain science 0 g is actually preferred, however, a craft with artificial gravity would have different zones with gravity and no gravity.

Docking to a rotating structure would be more difficult.

It has been noted, that artificial gravity might be best generated by tying two spacecrafts together using a cable. An approach like that might be suited for interplanetary travel where one would add redundancy by having two vehicles.
 
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drwayne

Guest
Also note that unless the diameter is very large, there are noticable differences in acceleration between
one's head and feet
 
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Saiph

Guest
two other reasons:

1) It's unnecessary at this point, even if it is a huge boost in the astronaut's comfort levels.

2) It defeats the point of an orbital lab, at least a very big point...low gravity experimentation. Can't have that in a artificial gravity environment.
 
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neilsox

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With rotation, coriolis effect is severe for radius of less than about 100 meters. Coriolis effect is especially noticeable when you move about inside or outside the space craft. Two craft tethered together will likely be the method used for early tests, if any. A 100 meter tether between the space shuttle and the ISS would produce 1/6 g in the space shuttle, but only about 1/60 th g in the ISS, assuming the ISS has ten times the mass of the space shuttle. To move from one vehicle to the other would require a 100 meter space walk along the tether. Higher rotation rates would produce proportionally more gravity, but would threaten to snap the tether and/or possible damage to one or both of the craft at the attachment points. The ISS is quite fragile. The ISS is designed for zero g and some systems would malfunction even at 1/60 th g, I think. Clearly astronomy, communications and docking would be compromised. Some of the crew would experience motion sickness. Some vibration is likely. Neil
 
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kg

Guest
Would pointing the solar panels become a problem if the space station were rotating?
 
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