I HAVE A QUESTION FOR THE EXPERTS ON THIS BOARD IN RELATION TO MARS & SPACE X

Aug 22, 2020
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I made this video specifically for the experts on this panel, I'm a critical thinker & before the mods delete this thread could someone please explain and show proof of intense storms on any of these planets, also why is there never any storms on the SpaceX feed? Could someone please respectfully answer my question, thanks in advance.

View: https://youtu.be/V6bQg5zDzO0
 
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Feb 1, 2020
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One good answer with proof and you can change my mind from being a skeptic to a believer.
Mars has regular dust storms. sometimes for months at a time and over most of the planet. We simply don't get any information during the dust storms, so most folks don't notice Mars then.
If you recall the Spirit and Opportunity rovers, both were disabled by dust storms. So Martian dust storms do have an effect.
Mercury doesn't' have any atmosphere, so no storms. It's the same with the Moon.
Venus has storms high up, but the atmosphere is so thick at the surface that it's like molasses and we really don't understand it's dynamics at ground level.
Jupiter has an atmosphere, though it's moons don't. The Great Red Spot is a hurricane that has been raging on Jupiter now for over four hundred years. We have no idea how long its been going on. There are dozens of other storms there at any time.
Saturn has a weird polar storm that is hexagonal. It also has moons with atmosphere, Titan is the most interesting moon in the Solar System for some scientists. We don't understand Titan's weather yet.
Uranus and Neptune are Ice Giants. They have atmospheres but also have surfaces. Not much is really known there. No more than a few hours of satellite observing time at each.
Pluto has an atmosphere and some weather. But we really only have a few hours of observation time for that 'minor' planet.
The sun also has storms across it's 'surface'.
So no, the Earth isn't unique in having weather. It is however unique in that we see it so much. That's because this is where we live.

You never see any storms on the SpaceX feed because they don't launch in bad weather. It has to be mild at the Cape and out at sea where their boosters land or they don't go. They've canceled several launches due to weather. So storms do happen, but they don't fly in bad weather, SpaceX just waits for good weather, which is why you only see good weather in the SpaceX video feeds.

You see the same sorts of selection in balloon flying. Hot air balloons don't launch during storms. Nor does SpaceX.

I don't understand just what it is that you don't understand here. Could you elaborate?
 
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Feb 18, 2020
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An excellent summary.

CT wrote this: "One good answer with proof and you can change my mind from being a skeptic to a believer. "

There you have an excellent answer with all the proof you should need.

Cat :)
 
Dec 11, 2019
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Oct 16, 2020
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Hi,

I don't know what planets you are refering to but the concept of "storm" is variable since on earth we have a very thick atmosphere. Other planets have different compositions of atmospheres and densities and gravity and other atmospheric phenomenon. So the way that storms act and what elements are in those storms are variable. Certain types of events are still not known by researchers clearly beyond theory. For instance Marital Dust Devils are a recently new "discovery" these are very high pressure and localized martian tornadoes but they are composed of different particles. They are dust storms because mars regolith is eroded to create martian dust, and there may be other stuff in it too as chemical reactions on planets produce other complex chemicals. For instance on Venus there is massive weather and storm events there is massively dense CO2, methane etc.. heat will cause stimulation of chemicals and create motions, since there are multiple actions at play, the amount of gravity, how much chemical energy, the speed things are moving to create friciton and on and on and on. Storms themselves occur at different elevations also. So the angle of the camera would lead to how visible a storm is. I'm not sure what feed you are talking about but it would directly relate to the thickness of the particles and how they effected photons going toward the camera such that it would create a difference in the view. Since a thick storm at a higher elevation would block photons if that storm occured at high elevation there would be no visible light or low light at lower elevations to view the storm under the cloud cover. Mars for instance has very massive stormfronts that are prolonged.
 
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Feb 1, 2020
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Hi,

I don't know what planets you are refering to ...
Every body in the Solar System with an atmosphere has storms. They arise for the same reason. Different areas have different pressures due to different cooling effects. This creates circulation patterns. The most violent circulation we refer to as 'Storms'. Mars has dust storms and commonly also little dust devils. When there are large dust storms, the entire surface of large areas, sometimes the entire planet can be obscured by these storms. Jupiter and Saturn also have storms. We haven't watched any other planets for long enough to establish the weather there.
Here on Earth we call the most noticeable large storms 'hurricanes' or 'typhoons'. They are large, but are not really the biggest. Jupiter has much larger and more powerful ones. Saturn may as well. Casinni's climate records haven't been fully examined yet.
See my previous post if you want more information, or ask a competent meterologist or better yet, an atmospheric Physicist. But be prepared, it isn't a simple or an easy subject.
 
Nov 3, 2020
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As I understand it, storms on other planets occur in principle on the same principle as on Earth, when streams of cold and warm gas come into contact? Only the scale is completely different, as I understand it. Depending on the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of the planet, can we differentiate the intensity of the storm?
 
Oct 23, 2020
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As I understand it, storms on other planets occur in principle on the same principle as on Earth, when streams of cold and warm gas come into contact? Only the scale is completely different, as I understand it. Depending on the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of the planet, can we differentiate the intensity of the storm?
You will find all kinds of similar physical processes on most of the other planets. Strong winds, lighting and thunder and even rain—though not necessarily water. The only planet where no weather is to be found is Mercury, as it doesn’t have the atmosphere to sustain weather. But weather can even be found on moons in principle, as is the case with Saturn’s moon Titan which has a complex weather system involving methane clouds and rain.
 

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