Is "Black Hole"....

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Kalstang

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Is the word "Black Hole" an accurate discription? From what I understand of black holes they are nothing more then extremely extremely condenced matter. Not actually a hole. Is there something that I'm missing or dont know that everyone else does know? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#ffff00"><p><font color="#3366ff">I have an answer for everything...you may not like the answer or it may not satisfy your curiosity..but it will still be an answer.</font> <br /><font color="#ff0000">"Imagination is more important then Knowledge" ~Albert Einstien~</font> <br /><font color="#cc99ff">Guns dont kill people. People kill people</font>.</p></font><p><font color="#ff6600">Solar System</font></p> </div>
 
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SpeedFreek

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You are correct. A black hole isn't actually a hole, but is a ball of extremely dense matter. So dense, that light cannot escape it.<br /><br />If you looked at a black hole, supposedly you would see a black disc surrounded by stars. Near the edge of the disc, the stars would look compressed. If distant stars pass behind the black hole the light from them would be bent and trapped.<br /><br />So what you would see is, in essence, a black hole in space. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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Excellent description, a Neutron Star is the closest visible object to a Black Hole, if you could get e look at one of those, you would have a pretty good example of what one would look like. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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yevaud

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"Black Hole" is actually a name coined during the 1960's by the Physicist John Archibald Wheeler, and it became popularized. Still, as pointed out, it's succintly accurate.<br /><br />The correct term is Singularity, which means "a place where physics break down." (used in Mathematics as well) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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SpeedFreek

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They can be thought of as a "hole", due to the idea that if you fall into one, you can never get out again!<br /><br />There has been speculation that if you could somehow <i> traverse </i> a black hole, you might emerge in another universe! But according to present theory this would be impossible due to a number of factors, including the so called "spaghettification" of the matter in your body and the idea that as you reach infinite density you would experience no time.<br /><br />The way I understand it, the reason that a black hole or singularity doesn't affect everything around it, breaking down the laws of physics until it destroys the order of everything in the universe, is due to it having an event horizon which is the threshold which once passed you can never return from. If there was a "naked" singularity in the universe it might be a very dangerous place!<br /><br />I have also heard ideas that the good old big bang might have had something to do with a naked singularity. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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dragon04

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I've read a great deal about black holes. The one thing I've never seen is any estimated distance from the event horizon to the singularity.<br /><br />Open question to anyone... Would not the distance to the singularity be the radius of the event horizon?<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Issac asimov says it was loosely called collasar.Gravitational collapse gives rise to white dwarf due to degeneration .When the star is more than 1.4 times the mass of sun it degenerates to neutron star.When a neutron star collapses on itself,it becomes infinitely small.Wheeler coined the term black hole.To undestand black hole properly one should be clear on degeneration of matter.
 
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alokmohan

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Circumference is nt psi r sqare.Altogether new maths for that.The radius of such small thing may be million km.
 
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green_meklar

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>The one thing I've never seen is any estimated distance from the event horizon to the singularity.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />In terms of simple geometry, I'd say that the distance should be equal to the radius, half the diameter of the event horizon. However, we run into some problems because the physics going on inside tend to change things around a lot. It's possible that to someone inside a black hole the singularity would appear to be much farther from the event horizon than it appears to us. But I think you'd really have to ask someone who understands physics well (i.e. not me) to get a good answer on that. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>________________</p><p>Repent! Repent! The technological singularity is coming!</p> </div>
 
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publiusr

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I like the term 'collapsar' myself--though I guess that could apply to quark stars, neutron stars, etc.<br /><br />Terms like collapsar and 'monobloc' aren't in much truck these days.
 
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Saiph

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distance to the singularity is basically infinite, because space gets stretched out so much.<br /><br />At the very least, due to the warping of space, the distance to the singularity is far greater than the radius of the event horizon observed by an external frame of reference. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Its black hole +quantum mechanics .Quantum gravity will be the right nane.Its altogether new type of geomtry unlike anything known to us. Radius of black hole cannot be measured by psi method.Radius infinity we may say.
 
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alokmohan

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If you pass through singularity,what may happen is interesting. For discussions sake I say if you dive in a black hole you may reach throgh another point to be out.You may reach a different space time in our universe OR you may reach a spacetinme in another universe.Of course you know that due to tidal gravity you will be stretched so big that you die.This all for discussion.
 
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docm

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Actually the matter sucked into a black hole is re-emitted as Hawking radiation over time. Information regarding its previous structure is encoded in the emitted particles etc., but it's of little practical use: you're still shredded by tidal forces before you "escape".<br /><br />Even if the singularity were rotating fast enough to form a large ring singularity (that's how you get a stable wormhole) <i><b>and</b></i> it somehow managed to connect with another ring singularity somewhere else in the universe, escaping the event horizon on the other side presents the same problem....how to escape without;<br /><br />1. going superluminal (see Einstein)<br /><br />2. being shredded and spit out as Hawking radiation by the other black hole. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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worm holes are very fascinating,you can commute universe to universe.Through warm hole you an reach a whitehole also in another space time and another universe.
 
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vastbluesky92

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Worm holes are not rotating black holes. If you go through a worm hole you come out the other end of the worm hole, not a white hole, which you could (hopefully) come back through. One end of a worm hole is not different from the other. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>--____________________________________________--</p><p><font size="1"> Don't be too hard on me...I'm only in PHY 1010 ;)</font></p><p> </p><p><font color="#339966">         The following goes without saying:</font> </p> </div>
 
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muscles

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A black hole's effect on light has always been a mystery to me. Light is a form of energy, yes?, and I've always heard that energy and matter are interchangable but not the same thing. But then if light is not matter then how does the effect of gravity act upon it? If light cannot escape a black hole, then wouldn't that imply that it has some mass in order for gravity to pull it in? I've always thought of light as extremely minute particles of matter with incredible amounts of energy. It is probably a simple concept that I am overlooking. I am completely and utterly boggled.
 
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nexus555

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Well obviously wormholes have not been proven yet. But one theory for wormholes state there is an event horizon before it as well. Meaning if you tried to enter a wormhole, you would be frozen in a time statis. <br /><br />I personally think anything that would bend space/time would probably have an event horizon.. but I'm not physicist either.
 
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Kalstang

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Nexus555 says: <font color="yellow">Meaning if you tried to enter a wormhole, you would be frozen in a time statis.</font><br /><br />Not really. The Earth has an "event horizon". At least as to how I consider it anyways. An event horizon can be literally be the horizon, the event being when you see the half the sun or moon. Or am I thinking wrong? I know its main defination has to do with black holes but couldnt that be considered one also? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#ffff00"><p><font color="#3366ff">I have an answer for everything...you may not like the answer or it may not satisfy your curiosity..but it will still be an answer.</font> <br /><font color="#ff0000">"Imagination is more important then Knowledge" ~Albert Einstien~</font> <br /><font color="#cc99ff">Guns dont kill people. People kill people</font>.</p></font><p><font color="#ff6600">Solar System</font></p> </div>
 
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elguapoguano

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also pure speculation, but I would say the eq of an event horizon for Earth, would be it's Gravity well. So the event horizon for Earth would be the point in Space where Earth's gravity pulls you in, which would require a quite a bit of DeltaV to "escape". <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#ff0000"><u><em>Don't let your sig line incite a gay thread ;>)</em></u></font> </div>
 
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vastbluesky92

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Muscles, matter warps spacetime, a phenomenon known as gravity, which is why it has an effect on light. Just because photons don't have mass doesn't mean that they don't travel from one point to another on the shortest path through warped spacetime.<br />The fact that they don't have mass means that they don't attract other mass, not necessarily that they aren't attracted by mass. In a black hole, spacetime has ultimate curvature so nothing can escape, whether it has mass or not.<br />Either that, or I understand this wrong, which is not impossible. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>--____________________________________________--</p><p><font size="1"> Don't be too hard on me...I'm only in PHY 1010 ;)</font></p><p> </p><p><font color="#339966">         The following goes without saying:</font> </p> </div>
 
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Kalstang

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>but I would say the eq of an event horizon for Earth, would be it's Gravity well. So the event horizon for Earth would be the point in Space where Earth's gravity pulls you in, which would require a quite a bit of DeltaV to "escape". <p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Either way it is escapeable and it doesnt "stop" you. So why would a wormholes EH stop you? I can understand a BH's EH "stopping" you. But a wormhole? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#ffff00"><p><font color="#3366ff">I have an answer for everything...you may not like the answer or it may not satisfy your curiosity..but it will still be an answer.</font> <br /><font color="#ff0000">"Imagination is more important then Knowledge" ~Albert Einstien~</font> <br /><font color="#cc99ff">Guns dont kill people. People kill people</font>.</p></font><p><font color="#ff6600">Solar System</font></p> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Worm holes has been discussed elaborately by Kip Thorne.His wife Caroline travelled through worm hole .Thre wre two mouths of the worm hole.One Kip kept in his own hand.Another through which Karoline went to another star.They had some paradoxes which I dont understand.
 
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