Lake Cheko-Tuguska update

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JonClarke

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<p>The latest Scientific American (June) has an article on lake Cheko in Siberia as a possible crater formed by the Tunguska exploration.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It is a good summary of the evidence and counter to&nbsp;the arguments against an impact origin.&nbsp; The area is very remote logicistically and the Russian military allowed them to use a Mil 26 helicopter to take the heavy equipment in and out.&nbsp; Few logistic problems in field work are intractable when you have a Mil 26!</p><p>Lake Cheko is morphologically similar to impact craters and dissimilar to other lakes in the area.&nbsp;</p><p>It is within the devasted area and on the flight line of the impactor.&nbsp; The crater is elongated parallel to the flight line.&nbsp; </p><p>The sediment layer in the lake is very thin and contains abundant wood debris destroyed by the impact.</p><p>Trees along the lake sure have grown asymmetrically indicating sudden reomoval of forest along the lake side.</p><p>There is no indication in maps or oral tradition of the lake existing before Tunguska.</p><p>Interestingly, in almost the exact centre of the lake and the deepest part, there is a buried high density magnetic object about 1 m across.&nbsp; The authors expect to return to Lake Cheko later this year and drill the feature.&nbsp; Presumably the Mil 26 will come in useful one again.</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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michaelmozina

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The latest Scientific American (June) has an article on lake Cheko in Siberia as a possible crater formed by the Tunguska exploration.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It is a good summary of the evidence and counter to&nbsp;the arguments against an impact origin.&nbsp; The area is very remote logicistically and the Russian military allowed them to use a Mil 26 helicopter to take the heavy equipment in and out.&nbsp; Few logistic problems in field work are intractable when you have a Mil 26!Lake Cheko is morphologically similar to impact craters and dissimilar to other lakes in the area.&nbsp;It is within the devasted area and on the flight line of the impactor.&nbsp; The crater is elongated parallel to the flight line.&nbsp; The sediment layer in the lake is very thin and contains abundant wood debris destroyed by the impact.Trees along the lake sure have grown asymmetrically indicating sudden reomoval of forest along the lake side.There is no indication in maps or oral tradition of the lake existing before Tunguska.Interestingly, in almost the exact centre of the lake and the deepest part, there is a buried high density magnetic object about 1 m across.&nbsp; The authors expect to return to Lake Cheko later this year and drill the feature.&nbsp; Presumably the Mil 26 will come in useful one again.Jon <br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>I just read that article last night.&nbsp; I loved it.&nbsp; It seems very plausible to me based on the shape of the lake, the fact it's not recorded on previous maps, and the high density feature at the deepest part of the lake.&nbsp;&nbsp; I just hope that nothing like that ever happens over a major city. &nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I just read that article last night.&nbsp; I loved it.&nbsp; It seems very plausible to me based on the shape of the lake, the fact it's not recorded on previous maps, and the high density feature at the deepest part of the lake.&nbsp;&nbsp; I just hope that nothing like that ever happens over a major city. &nbsp; <br />Posted by michaelmozina</DIV><br /><br />Coming up on the 100th Anniversery at the end of next month...my grandkid's birthdays! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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michaelmozina

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Coming up on the 100th Anniversery at the end of next month...my grandkid's birthdays! <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>The fact that it's only been a hundred years since the event makes it a bit difficult to predict when we might expect another such event.&nbsp; Those Lasco images you posted today demonstate that the collision processes are ongoing, and we're fortunate&nbsp; that the sun, Jupiter and Saturn are the primary garbage collectors of the solar system.&nbsp; Ive seen lots of comets hit the sun's atmosphere and one major impact on Jupiter in my lifetime.&nbsp; I hope I miss the next big Earth impact by at least 100 years. :)&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I just read that article last night.&nbsp; I loved it.&nbsp; It seems very plausible to me based on the shape of the lake, the fact it's not recorded on previous maps, and the high density feature at the deepest part of the lake.&nbsp;&nbsp; I just hope that nothing like that ever happens over a major city. &nbsp; <br />Posted by michaelmozina</DIV></p><p>They certainly gave the impression they enjoyed the expedition&nbsp;- mosquitoes and all.&nbsp; At least one of the authors is obviously a plane nut.&nbsp; It wasn't just a military transport they flew in, but a Il-20M.&nbsp; And I am very envious about the ride in the Mil 26, that is one awesome machine.</p><p>The idea of a Tungusk happening over a major city is bad enough.&nbsp; if it happened over a ctiy of a nuclear power in the middle of a crisis it could be a global disater if someone had an itchy finger.</p><p>Jon<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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michaelmozina

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>They certainly gave the impression they enjoyed the expedition&nbsp;- mosquitoes and all.&nbsp; At least one of the authors is obviously a plane nut.&nbsp; It wasn't just a military transport they flew in, but a Il-20M.&nbsp; And I am very envious about the ride in the Mil 26, that is one awesome machine.The idea of a Tungusk happening over a major city is bad enough.&nbsp; if it happened over a ctiy of a nuclear power in the middle of a crisis it could be a global disater if someone had an itchy finger.Jon <br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>I guess the possibility of disaster really hit home for me while witnessing the impact of Shoemaker-Levy 9.&nbsp; That was quite an awesome event, and it may have wiped out almost all life on Earth or perhaps the whole Earth had it hit our planet rather than Jupiter.&nbsp; It's a little scary out there. :) </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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