Large Hadron collider soon operational.

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centsworth_II

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<p>From&nbsp; <u>http://lhc-commissioning.web.cern.ch/lhc%2Dcommissioning/</u></p><p>It looks like there will be no collisions until perhaps November, just before winter shutdown.&nbsp; Real experimentation won't get under way in earnest until spring 2009.&nbsp;</p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>Schedule Outline</strong></font></p> <ul><li><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>End of July:</strong> The LHC is expected to be cooled down. The experiments are requested to have their beam pipes baked out.</font></li><li> <font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>Early August: </strong>The experimental caverns will be closed after the caverns and tunnel have been patrolled. Safety tests will then be performed. From then on the controlled access system will be fully activated. At this stage an Injection Test into sector 23 is planned.</font></li><li><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>Early September:</strong> First particles will be injected, and the commissioning with beams will start.</font></li><li><font size="2" color="#000080">It is expected that it will take about 2 months to have first collisions at 10 TeV centre of mass energy.</font></li><li><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>Energy of the 2008 run:</strong> Agreed to be 10 TeV. The machine considers this to be a safe setting to optimize up-time of the machine until the winter shut-down (starting likely around end of November). Therefore, simulations can now start for 10 TeV.</font></li><li><font size="2" color="#000080">The winter shut-down will then be used to commissioning and train the magnets up to full current, such that the 2009 run will start at the full 14 TeV design energy. </font></li></ul> <p><font size="2" color="#000080"><br /><br /></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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<p>According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Hadron_Collider<br /> </p><p>&nbsp;<font size="2" color="#000080">The initial particle beams are due for injection in August 2008, the first attempt to circulate beam through the entire LHC is scheduled for September 10, 2008, and the first high-energy collisions are planned to take place after the LHC is officially unveiled, on October 21, 2008.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

Guest
<h2 class="post-title"><font size="2">Late breaking posts from the US LHC blogers : http://uslhc.us/blogs/</font></h2><p>(I reversed the order to put the older post first.)&nbsp;</p><p><strong><font size="3">Are we there yet ?</font></strong></p>"It is like a fish market in the main control room now. Today, Aug 8, 2008 at 16:40 all the safety interlocks tests in the LHC were completed and the machine was fully closed for the first beam tests. However, it hasn&rsquo;t without some small hickups, a fire alarm in the pre-injector (PS) and along with some other cabling problems, small panics before the big thing&hellip; <p>It is about 6pm now and they have managed to put the beam through the injector chain and all the way through the transfer line just 15 m before the LHC tunnel where it is stopped. The stopper in the transfer line will be removed shortly (6-8pm). The plan is to then adjust the timing of the injection magnets to put the beam into the LHC and thread the beam thereafter the sector 2-3 before midnight. Slightly optimistic but when you wake up tomorrow could the &ldquo;first beam in the LHC&rdquo; already be an old story ?"</p><h2 class="post-title">Congratulations!</h2><p><font color="#000000"><font size="2">"Beam in the LHC!</font> </font>A few of us were following the developments from the ATLAS control room. The comments on this screen shot from the LHC Operation Group web page say it all:" </p><p><img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-302" src="http://uslhc.us/blogs/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/lhc-300x225.png" alt="" width="300" height="225" /></p><p><font size="2">&nbsp;<span style="font-weight:bold">"Beam in </span><strong>LHC</strong><span style="font-weight:bold">"&nbsp; "Beam to IR3"</span></font></p><p>What I think this means is that as illustrated below, the beam was injected at TI2 and stopped at POINT 3. The yellow highlighting shows the path of the beam. </p><p>In the bottom-most illustration (which is rotated 180 degrees so that TI2 is at the top of the large circle) POINT 3 is referred to as IR3.</p><p><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/12/15/3c24dd66-189c-4690-bf8e-71b1a356cfbf.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br />http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp;<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/4/1/54a83282-3994-4064-a14f-94cc59decdff.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p>http://universe-review.ca/R15-20-accelerators.htm<p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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arkady

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<p>Latest update from&nbsp;http://public.web.cern.ch/Public/Welcome.html ....</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong><font size="4">LHC synchronization test successful</font></strong></p><p>The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. </p><p>After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. <br />The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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arkady

Guest
<p>New&nbsp;update from official site.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h2>Final LHC Synchronization Test a Success</h2><p>Geneva, 25 August 2008. CERN has today announced the success of the second and final test of the Large Hadron Collider&rsquo;s beam synchronization systems which will allow the LHC operations team to inject the first beam into the LHC.</p><p>Friday evening 22 August, a single bunch of a few particles travelled down the transfer line from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered counter-clockwise about 3 kilometres around the LHC.&nbsp;</p><p><cite>&ldquo;Thanks to a fantastic team, both the clock-wise and counter-clockwise tests went without a hitch. We look forward to a resounding success when we make our first attempt to send a beam all the way around the LHC,&rdquo;</cite> said Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader. </p><p>Both the counter-clockwise and clockwise tests are part of the preparations to ready the LHC, the world&rsquo;s most powerful particle accelerator, for the eventual acceleration and collision of two beams at an energy of 5 TeV per beam. This unprecedented event is foreseen to take place by end 2008.&nbsp; </p><h3>Upcoming events marking LHC start-up</h3><p><u>10 September</u>: The first attempt to circulate a beam in the LHC will be made on 10 September at the injection energy of 450 GeV (0.45 TeV). This historical event will be webcast through http://webcast.cern.ch, and distributed through the Eurovision network. See http://www.cern.ch/lhc-first-beam for further details.</p><p><u>3 October</u>: CERN will host the LHC Grid Fest, a celebration of the LHC Computing Grid, a global computing grid designed to handle 15 million gigabytes of LHC-related data every year. The day will feature presentations, demonstrations, tours of the CERN Computer Centre and more. See http://www.cern.ch/lcg/lhcgridfest for more details. </p><p><u>21 October</u>: CERN will host the Official Inauguration of the LHC with representatives of CERN member and observer States.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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pmn1

Guest
<p class="MsoNormal">From the Sunday Times 7<sup>th</sup> September 2008</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <h1><span style="font-size:12pt;font-weight:normal">Large Hadron Collider could help fight cancer</span></h1> <h2><span style="font-size:12pt;font-weight:normal">Stand by for advances in health and climate research as the &lsquo;big bang&rsquo; machine starts up</span></h2> <p class="MsoNormal"><span class="byline">Jonathan Leake </span></p> <p>The giant new particle collider at Europe&rsquo;s centre for nuclear research, which is due to start work on Wednesday, is being linked to spectacular spin-offs including improved cancer treatments, systems for destroying nuclear waste and insights into climate change. </p> <p>&ldquo;Everyone is looking at the start up of the Large Hadron Collider [LHC] but Cern has many other research programmes with important practical uses,&rdquo; said Paul Collier, who runs the main control room at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (Cern). </p> <p>The first beams of particles have been successfully fired around nearly half of the 17-mile tunnel in Switzerland, where Cern is based. Linked research has already spurred useful byproducts. </p> <p>In a typical year, the huge machine, which will smash particles into each other at enormous speed, should generate enough data to fill 56m CDs. That means physicists have had to create a sophisticated system for organising information extremely quickly. The Grid, as they call it, is likely to become the model for many other systems designed to handle large volumes of data. </p> <p>Another project has suggested a potentially radical new way of dealing with nuclear waste. Cern&rsquo;s physicists found that firing a beam of protons (a type of sub-atomic particle) into blocks of lead could generate a shower of neutrons (another sub-atomic particle) &ndash; and that these could then be used to break down radioactive waste into harmless stable elements. </p> <p>A Cern spokesman said the technique was being studied by industry. &ldquo;This technology sprung from insights into matter generated by pure physics,&rdquo; he said. </p> <p>Cern has also contributed to medical research, treating cancers with beams of charged particles such as protons, carbon ions and even antimatter. </p> <p>Antimatter does not exist naturally but Cern can make it using a smaller accelerator, the proton synchrotron. The machine is also involved in generating the protons that will orbit around the LHC. The interest in such beams arises because existing forms of radiation therapy may kill cancers but damage surrounding tissue. </p> <p>Particle beams could minimise such damage as they can be tuned to pass through healthy tissue and deposit energy only in the tumour. </p> <p>Cern&rsquo;s latest research project may prove the most controversial. It is building a laboratory to investigate the theory that the rate of cloud formation in the atmosphere is linked to the level of cosmic rays. </p> <p>Cloud formation is a vital component of climate and weather, and the project could place Cern at the heart of the debate on whether other factors besides greenhouse gases are involved in climate change. </p> <p>The researchers will use a proton beam from the proton synchrotron to simulate cosmic rays, firing them into a so-called &ldquo;cloud chamber&rdquo; to see whether mini clouds form. </p> <p>Bob Bingham, professor of physics at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire, who is involved with the project, said: &ldquo;If the beams cause cloud formation it will suggest a link between cosmic rays and climate which has interesting implications.&rdquo; </p> <p>On Wednesday scientists will find out whether the LHC&rsquo;s &pound;3 billion cost has paid off. </p> <p>In the past few days beams of particles have been fired through three of the LHC&rsquo;s eight sections, also passing through Alice, and LHCb, two of the four main experiments. Both worked well. </p> <p>The two other experiments, Atlas and CMS have not seen a beam but appear to be working &ndash; as shown by their ability to detect natural cosmic rays. </p> <p>If Wednesday&rsquo;s start-up goes smoothly a second beam will be fired into the machine travelling in the opposite direction&ndash; with the two forced to collide. The products of those collisions could give physicists their best insight into the structure and origins of the universe. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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weeman

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Is it actually believed by some physicists at this point that the LHC could produce tiny black holes and/or mini quasars? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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vastbluesky92

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Is it actually believed by some physicists at this point that the LHC could produce tiny black holes and/or mini quasars? <br /> Posted by weeman</DIV></p><p><font size="1">It seems to me that I haven't heard of any real physicists who believe that, only regular people who've heard a little bit about black holes. </font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>--____________________________________________--</p><p><font size="1"> Don't be too hard on me...I'm only in PHY 1010 ;)</font></p><p> </p><p><font color="#339966">         The following goes without saying:</font> </p> </div>
 
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why06

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<p>I've been wondering why it is so far underground? Safety prodautions? Or just not to disturb the neighboors?</p><p>Also... Will there be tours once it opens. I would love to view the machine so complex that no single person can understand in detail all its workings. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div>________________________________________ <br /></div><div><ul><li><font color="#008000"><em>your move...</em></font></li></ul></div> </div>
 
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why06

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It seems to me that I haven't heard of any real physicists who believe that, only regular people who've heard a little bit about black holes. <br /> Posted by vastbluesky92</DIV></p><p>You'll notice most people who say that are from America. Guess we're gettin a little worried as our nuke doesn't hold as big of a threat as a blackhole.&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div>________________________________________ <br /></div><div><ul><li><font color="#008000"><em>your move...</em></font></li></ul></div> </div>
 
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weeman

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I've been wondering why it is so far underground? Safety prodautions? Or just not to disturb the neighboors?Also... Will there be tours once it opens. I would love to view the machine so complex that no single person can understand in detail all its workings. <br />Posted by why06</DIV><br /><br />I suppose it's for aesthetics? The thing has a 17 mile circumference, much better to have it underground and out of sight <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-smile.gif" border="0" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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arkady

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I've been wondering why it is so far underground? Safety prodautions? Or just not to disturb the neighboors?Also... Will there be tours once it opens. I would love to view the machine so complex that no single person can understand in detail all its workings. <br />Posted by why06</DIV></p><p>Safety yes. Once and a while they will need to purge the photon samples as they become unfocused (bigger/less dense) over time. They do that through an "exhaust" pipe leading into the underlying Jura Mountains. As we're talking high energy radiation letting anything escape above the surface would not be a very good idea. Not sure about the actual risks, but goes without saying that it would present a PR nightmare. </p><p>About visiting check official site, or http://outreach.web.cern.ch/outreach/&nbsp;specifically.</p><p>First beam tomorrow btw. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-smile.gif" border="0" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /></p><p>There'll be a webcast at <font color="#5574b9">http://webcast.cern.ch</font>. It's at 9am CEST though, so probably a bit late for the yankees.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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<font color="#333399"><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I've been wondering why it is so far underground? Safety prodautions? Or just not to disturb the neighboors?<br /> Posted by why06</DIV><br /></font><p><font color="#003366">"The LHC has been built in a tunnel originally constructed for a previous collider (LEP &ndash; the Large Electron Positron collider). This was the most economic solution to building both LEP and the LHC. It was cheaper to build an underground tunnel than acquire the equivalent land above ground. Putting the machine underground also greatly reduces the environmental impact of the LHC and associated activities.</font></p> <p><font color="#003366">The rock surrounding the LHC is a natural shield that reduces the amount of natural radiation that reaches the LHC and this reduces interference with the detectors. Vice versa, radiation produced when the LHC is running is safely shielded by 50 &ndash; 100 metres of rock." <u>http://www.lhc.ac.uk/about-the-lhc/faqs.html</u></font> </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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arkady

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The rock surrounding the LHC is a natural shield that reduces the amount of natural radiation that reaches the LHC and this reduces interference with the detectors.<br /> Posted by centsworth_II</DIV></p><p>Ah yes ofcourse, dunno why that didn't occur to me. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-tongue-out.gif" border="0" alt="Tongue out" title="Tongue out" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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why06

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>"The LHC has been built in a tunnel originally constructed for a previous collider (LEP &ndash; the Large Electron Positron collider). This was the most economic solution to building both LEP and the LHC. It was cheaper to build an underground tunnel than acquire the equivalent land above ground. Putting the machine underground also greatly reduces the environmental impact of the LHC and associated activities. The rock surrounding the LHC is a natural shield that reduces the amount of natural radiation that reaches the LHC and this reduces interference with the detectors. Vice versa, radiation produced when the LHC is running is safely shielded by 50 &ndash; 100 metres of rock." http://www.lhc.ac.uk/about-the-lhc/faqs.html <br /> Posted by centsworth_II</DIV></p><p>thanks, to both of you, for clarification </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div>________________________________________ <br /></div><div><ul><li><font color="#008000"><em>your move...</em></font></li></ul></div> </div>
 
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trumptor

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>First beam tomorrow btw. </DIV><br /><br />But tomorrow is only the beginning. It will take up to two years for it to fully power up I think. And I think it will take another couple of years for the mini-black holes to sink into the Earth's core and eat everything in sight. </p><p>&nbsp;And by December 23rd, 2012 the Mayans will prove their knowledge was greater than we all imagined, when we start seeing parts of the crust fall through and sink to the black hole in our core.&nbsp;It will also&nbsp;crack a leak in the crust under the&nbsp;Atlantic's ocean floor draining all the water from the&nbsp;atlantic before we&nbsp;manage to plug the hole up with stuff. </p><p>And then, having thought it through, we figure out that we may finally have a good place to deposit our garbage, toxic waste, and even our exhaust pollution. We can end our garbage problems, waste disposal problems, and even our global warming problems overnight. </p><p>Then on December 24th, 2012 an old man will come out of the forest&nbsp;and leave a booklet on a road somewhere, then disappear without a trace. We will find this booklet and find that it is a new Mayan calendar that starts on Dec 24th, 2012 and&nbsp;runs for the next&nbsp;1244 years and at the end it says, "the&nbsp;last year in no way means an end to anything, my fingers just got too tired to continue writing." And we will finally have solved a great many problems and gotten a cool endless garbage disposal under our feet too.</p><p>Now that would make a cool movie.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em><font color="#0000ff">______________</font></em></p><p><em><font color="#0000ff">Caution, I may not know what I'm talking about.</font></em></p> </div>
 
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arkady

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<p class="day-date">Everything as expected so far it seems. Really recommend the uslhc blog. Provides some interesting personal insights into the project. Here's an excerpt ... </p><p class="day-date">&nbsp;</p><p class="day-date">Posted by<em> Monica Dunford</em> on <em>10 Sep 2008</em> @ http://uslhc.us/blogs/ </p> <p>BEAM!!!!!! </p> <p>The relief is indescribable. I must have woken up one million times last night thinking, &lsquo;Did we remember&hellip;&rsquo;, &lsquo;What about&hellip;.&rsquo;, &lsquo;Did we do&hellip;.&rsquo;, &lsquo;Let&rsquo;s not forget&hellip;.&rsquo;. </p> <p>All Tile experts converged to the control room around 7am, even though beam was not expect until 9:30am. The wait wasn&rsquo;t so bad until about 9:15 when we had to stop the run and start afresh. Normally to stop the run and restart completely takes about 30 minutes. But every one was working at super human speeds, so we had the run going again at 9:29. At this point, I was absolutely pacing in the control room. I couldn&rsquo;t hold still for a second. </p> <p>The beam came to ATLAS (the last on the ring) around 10:20am. The first test they did was to smash the beam into one of the collimator. What we would expect to see in ATLAS is millions of muons flying into the detector. Which is exactly what we saw! The explanation of this picture isn&rsquo;t important. What is important is that you can see lots and lots of stuff. Tons and tons of muons. </p> <p><img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-356" src="http://blogs.uslhc.us/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/firstbeaminatlas-300x225.png" alt="First beam" width="300" height="225" /></p> <p>And now I can relax. Tile. After so much effort from so many people. It works. Just like we knew that it would. But still it is nice to actually see it working. And we can all take a deep breath of relief.</p> <p>But check out google&rsquo;s main page today! Here is a snapshot. Not every day your work gets to be on google!</p> <p><img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-357" src="http://blogs.uslhc.us/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/google_atlas-300x109.jpg" alt="Google atlas" width="300" height="109" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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arkady

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It seems to me that I haven't heard of any real physicists who believe that, only regular people who've heard a little bit about black holes. <br />Posted by vastbluesky92</DIV></p><p>At CERN energy will be compressed to an extremely small area, but according to accepted physical principles not nearly dense enough to invoke black holes. By a factor of a million or so. However if you incorporate newer more speculative theories like superstring-theory that introduces more dimensions that come into the picture at these extremely small distances, it is&nbsp;<u>conceivable</u> that gravity could change behavior that might make black holes a possibility with respect to this experiment.</p><p>So to put it shortly, Their appearance is not predicted by means of known physics, but neither can we totally reject the possibility on account of missing data. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>At CERN energy will be compressed to an extremely small area, but according to accepted physical principles not nearly dense enough to invoke black holes. By a factor of a million or so. However if you incorporate newer more speculative theories like superstring-theory that introduces more dimensions that come into the picture at these extremely small distances, it is&nbsp;conceivable that gravity could change behavior that might make black holes a possibility with respect to this experiment.So to put it shortly, Their appearance is not predicted by means of known physics, but neither can we totally reject the possibility on account of missing data. <br />Posted by arkady</DIV></p><p>The LHC fired up today and so far as I know France and Switzerland are still there.</p><p>Here is a discussion of the issue by a physicist who actually knows what he is talking about.</p><p>http://physics.aps.org/articles/v1/14<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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arkady

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The LHC fired up today and so far as I know France and Switzerland are still there.Here is a discussion of the issue by a physicist who actually knows what he is talking about.http://physics.aps.org/articles/v1/14 <br />Posted by DrRocket</DIV></p><p><br />The point of contention was whether black holes could be produced, and not&nbsp;whether they'd pose any danger. It is my understanding that should they (contrary to&nbsp;the what we know) be produced, the notion of them being a safety concern seems rather silly. Anyways,&nbsp;they just&nbsp;directed a beam all the way around for the first time. Now preparations have begun for sending one the other way around. Thanks for the link though.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The point of contention was whether black holes could be produced, and not&nbsp;whether they'd pose any danger. It is my understanding that should they (contrary to&nbsp;the what we know) be produced, the notion of them being a safety concern seems rather silly. Anyways,&nbsp;they just&nbsp;directed a beam all the way around for the first time. Now preparations have begun for sending one the other way around. Thanks for the link though.&nbsp; <br />Posted by arkady</DIV></p><p>You are correct.&nbsp; I should have read your post more closely.</p><p>I've seen too many way off base posts today on the subject of LHC and black holes.&nbsp; Yours actually is correct and makes sense.&nbsp; <br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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arkady

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>You are correct.&nbsp; I should have read your post more closely.I've seen too many way off base posts today on the subject of LHC and black holes.&nbsp; Yours actually is correct and makes sense.&nbsp; <br />Posted by DrRocket</DIV></p><p>No worries. Recent update from the US blog might cheer you up. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-tongue-out.gif" border="0" alt="Tongue out" title="Tongue out" /></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><blockquote><p>Urgent update, September 10, 2008</p><p><em>It is our duty to inform you that as of 7:35:05am UTC on September 10, 2008, the Earth has been destroyed.</em></p><p><em>The destruction of Earth was first reported by Mr Jonathan Barber of Wisconsin, United States, who spotted that his home-made seismic Earth Detector had ceased to give readings at around 8:00am (2am local time). Several other amateur geocide spotters noticed this at the same time but Mr. Barber was the first to place a telephone call to the IEDAB&rsquo;s Geocide Hotline (+44 115 09&Omega; 4127, ask for Other Dave) at which point IEDAB officials performed an emergency check of their own instrumentation and verified Mr. Barber&rsquo;s report, as well as fixing the exact time of geocide.</em></p><p><em>Evidence is still being collated, but preliminary results suggest that the Earth was destroyed pre-emptively by scientists at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, before the commencement of their experiments to locate the Higgs Boson, as a precautionary measure to ensure that the experiment itself could not result in the destruction of the Earth.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></blockquote> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> "<font color="#0000ff"><em>The choice is the Universe, or nothing</em> ... </font>" - H.G Wells </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p>I heard about a minor glitch a couple days ago, but didn't bother posting it.&nbsp; Apparently worse that first realized.</p><p><strong><font size="2"><span class="inside-head">Officials: Damage to collider forces 2-month halt</span></font></strong></p><div class="inside-copy">GENEVA (AP) &mdash; The world's largest atom smasher &mdash; which was launched with great fanfare earlier this month &mdash; has been damaged worse than previously thought and will be out of commission for at least two months, its operators said Saturday.</div> <p class="inside-copy">Experts have gone into 17-mile (27-kilometer) circular tunnel housing the Large Hadron Collider under the Swiss-French border to examine the damage that halted operations about 36 hours after its Sept. 10 start-up, said James Gillies, spokesman for CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research.</p> <p class="inside-copy">"It's too early to say precisely what happened, but it seems to be a faulty electrical connection between two magnets that stopped superconducting, melted and led to a mechanical failure and let the helium out," Gillies told The Associated Press.</p> <p class="inside-copy">Gillies said the sector that was damaged will have to be warmed up well above the absolute zero temperature used for operations so that repairs can be made &mdash; a time-consuming process.</p> <p class="inside-copy">"A number of magnets raised their temperature by around 100 degrees," Gillies said. "We have now to warm up the whole sector in a controlled manner before we can actually go in and repair it."</p><p class="inside-copy">It was at first thought the failure of an electrical transformer that handles part of the cooling was the problem, CERN said. That transformer was replaced last weekend and the machine was lowered back to operating temperature to prepare for a resumption of operations.</p> <p class="inside-copy">But then more inspections were needed and it was determined that the problem was worse than initially thought, said Gillies.</p><p class="inside-copy">&nbsp;</p><p class="inside-copy">Rest of article here: (I just cut out the fluff)</p><p class="inside-copy">http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2008-09-20-particle-collider_N.htm</p><p class="inside-copy">&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
R

R1

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<p><font size="2">Testing for the other dimensions will involve measuring the initial and resulting energy.</font></p><p><font size="2">We can potentially learn about building wormholes too.&nbsp; </font></p><p><font size="2">Invitation to good video of Brian Greene explaining: &nbsp;http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtdE662eY_M&feature=related</font></p><p>(edited for spelling correction)</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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