Leaving the gravity........

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MarcoSpace

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<p>So earth moves around the sun at a certain speed. Our solar system moves at a certain speed in the galaxy and our galaxy moves at a certain speed in the galaxy cluster. This cluster also moves at a certain speed. So far so good. What if someone were to leave the galaxy hub, say in a space ship. Wouldn it take longer to get "back" because everything is moving (in the case of that we went the oposite way of the galaxy movement pattern)? </p><p>I guess my question is, are they moving to fast to "catch again" and ride their gravitational movement?&nbsp; </p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>So earth moves around the sun at a certain speed. Our solar system moves at a certain speed in the galaxy and our galaxy moves at a certain speed in the galaxy cluster. This cluster also moves at a certain speed. So far so good. What if someone were to leave the galaxy hub, say in a space ship. Wouldn it take longer to get "back" because everything is moving (in the case of that we went the oposite way of the galaxy movement pattern)? I guess my question is, are they moving to fast to "catch again" and ride their gravitational movement?&nbsp; <br />Posted by MarcoSpace</DIV></p><p>As best as I can determine (it's not very clear exactly what you are asking), the answer is it depend on what your path of acceleration is.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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primordial

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>So earth moves around the sun at a certain speed. Our solar system moves at a certain speed in the galaxy and our galaxy moves at a certain speed in the galaxy cluster. This cluster also moves at a certain speed. So far so good. What if someone were to leave the galaxy hub, say in a space ship. Wouldn it take longer to get "back" because everything is moving (in the case of that we went the oposite way of the galaxy movement pattern)? I guess my question is, are they moving to fast to "catch again" and ride their gravitational movement?&nbsp; <br />Posted by MarcoSpace</DIV><br />MacroSpace : I think I understand what you are asking. If you could travel away from ( let me use a larger group than a galaxy cluster) our super cluster of galaxies into a large void then&nbsp;select to return to the your point of origin, the distance would be greater because of the effect Dark Energy has on the inflation of the universe, if this is what you were asking, I would say at the first look, yes, the distance would be greater to some degree, but it would depend on the magnitude of how far you would travel, how fast you could travel and how long you stayed at the far point, the velocity the space craft could obtain would determine if you could catch the point of origin, as for the idea of riding their gravitational movement, you would not have left the gravitational effect of your point of origin as long as you and it (your point of origin)are inside the same visible universe, however I suppose it could be possible to reach a point where the Dark Energy and Gravity of the point of origin reach near equal in their effect on you at the far point.
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>So earth moves around the sun at a certain speed. Our solar system moves at a certain speed in the galaxy and our galaxy moves at a certain speed in the galaxy cluster. This cluster also moves at a certain speed. So far so good. What if someone were to leave the galaxy hub, say in a space ship. Wouldn it take longer to get "back" because everything is moving (in the case of that we went the oposite way of the galaxy movement pattern)? I guess my question is, are they moving to fast to "catch again" and ride their gravitational movement?&nbsp; <br /> Posted by MarcoSpace</DIV></p><p>I don't think it would take a longer in your reference frame.&nbsp; When you begin your travels, you are already moving in relation to the cluster.&nbsp; In that frame, you have zero velocity until you begin to travel.&nbsp; Same concept as walking up and down the isle on a train.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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SpeedFreek

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#3366ff">So earth moves around the sun at a certain speed. Our solar system moves at a certain speed in the galaxy and our galaxy moves at a certain speed in the galaxy cluster. This cluster also moves at a certain speed. So far so good.</font><br /> Posted by MarcoSpace</DIV></p><p>Your concept of "movement" is fine all the way up to the galaxy cluster, but the cluster itself can be considered to be at rest, relative to the expansion of the universe (the "Hubble Flow"). Inertial movement occurs within the galaxy clusters, but the clusters themselves are all essentially at rest. Only the expansion of the universe causes an apparent increase in the distance between these clusters, but the clusters aren't actually moving through space. </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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