Looking to buy your first telescope? Part 1

Page 4 - Seeking answers about space? Join the Space community: the premier source of space exploration, innovation, and astronomy news, chronicling (and celebrating) humanity's ongoing expansion across the final frontier.
Status
Not open for further replies.
I

ianke

Guest
Ya, thanks from me too! I appreciate the help I get from all you guys.<br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
One more question...<br /><br />What are the pros and cons of 2" eyepieces vs. 1.25"?<br />Should a mix be more useful? <br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
No, get what your scope accepts.<br />In general, the coversion to the other size is only worth it if you already have eyepieces that you've paid big bucks for in the other size. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
So if it accepts 2" then get"2"? Thanks MW.<br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
what is the most easily used star chart software for Mes. objects?<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
Hi crazeddie,<br /><br />Perhaps a mix of 1 or 2 nice low and medium power 2" added to the mix would be nice. Do you hav a preference of types?<br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
Again... Thanks CE.<br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
I just ordered the book. Thanks for the link as it allows you to read the preface. I can't wait for it to arive. I really appreciate the time you put in to getting this novice up to speed. The knowledge and pointers will be powerful tools In the next month as I am getting ready for the purchase of my new SC. I feel that you have aided in making me a better consumer in the astronomy discipline.<br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
Hi CE,<br /><br />I'm sorry that I keep asking you so many questions. I must be getting quite annoying by now, so I'll try to make this my last.<br /><br />I am looking for really good eyepieces. I only want to puchase any given size once, so I want to go the best first. I figure that TeleVue is the Company to go to. If I am wrong about this Co, please say so.<br /><br />My main question is this...<br /><br />I am running into different types of eyepieces. What are the main differences between them (Pannoptic,Possl, radian, and Nagler{types 4,5&6})? Do you or anyone here have the run down on these types? I realize the price is widely varied, but what can one expect for the money out of each type?<br /><br />Perhaps you know of a link you could give as I understand this is a complex question. Any help you could give would be very helpful as I am going to be dropping a huge wad of cash very soon. I'd hate to screw up and buy the wrong thing and wish I had known better. <br /><br />Thanks In Advance,<br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
J

jwjapan

Guest
First time post here. I have read all the posts and am still confused. <br /><br />I just purchased a log cabin in the mountains... of Japan. It is located in the area with the most sunny days in Japan, with gorgeous views of the Yatsugatake range, and the Southern Alps. It is far away from big city light pollution, and has a great deck to view from. <br /><br />So here is my question. I have a limited budget. (got to pay off that mortgage!) But want to spend about $300. I would like to get the most aperture for my buck to take advantage of that dark and clear night sky with all those stars. But I would also like to be able to point it out across that vista and see wildlife and the mountains. <br /><br />What would you suggest?<br />
 
I

ianke

Guest
Hello jwjapan,<br /><br />First of all welcome to SDC. <br /><br />I am maybe not the best to answer this,but here is what I would do in your place. I would scratch out the telescope and opt for either the best binoculars and tripod set-up, or maybe a spotting scope if terestrial viewing is important with only one instrument. <br /><br />You see $300 would buy a pretty decent 6" Dobsonian, but viewing flora and fawna is not its thing. <br /><br />Perhaps you could split the money and get a fair priced Dob and a cheap set of department store binoculars. that would serve both usages probably better than trying to get a single instrument to do both. <br /><br />I'm sure that someone else here will be glad to help you better than I can. Just stick around.<img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
Is that your house jwjapan? If so then WOW is that a nice place you have. Very pretty indeed.<br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
J

jwjapan

Guest
Thank you! It is going to need a little work, but we are very excited to move in. I was also thinking about the dobs as the best value for the money, but was afraid that it would be useless for terrestial. I found something made by a Japanese company "Kenko" last night, advertised as a Skywalker Mak80, that fits in my budget nicely, but I think it is more of a spotting scope than a telescope. But considering how clear and dark the skies are, would it be a good starter for me and my son? I found the same thing advertised in English as a Skywatcher Mak80 but could not find any reviews of it on telescope.com -- anyone heard of it?
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
The disadvantage to a small dob (6", which would be in your general price range) is that terrestrial images (as well as the sky ones) are upside down. Other than that, it would be OK for Birds and other terrestrial critters.<br /><br />There is an image erector available, that you could use in the day....it adds more glass, which causes some dimming, but in the day, that's not much of a problem.<br /><br />Please wait for eddie's reply before deciding anything. He's far more knowledgeable about scopes than I am. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
J

jwjapan

Guest
I guess that is why I couldn't seem to find anything that would do the trick. I wonder if you could recommend a small refractor? Also would like your opinion on a small Mak-Cas. I found an 80mm one here in Japan but could not find anything about it in English or a review. It says that it has a motor drive on an altizumuth mount. Would this allow me to spot as well as serve as a telescope?
 
V

vandivx

Guest
<font color="yellow">Dobsonians are almost impossible to use as terrestrial spotting scopes</font><br /><br />this has always intrigued me, can you or anybody else say exactly what it the problem? of course I only ever looked through binos and I am contemplating getting Dobsonian sometimes this coming winter and at first I thought about 8" (ok I thought of the bigger ones too but downscalled my appetite after reading this thread and its not matter of $s really) but I might even get the smallest one 4.5" Orion they make for kids LOL, thing is those things look deceptively small on webpage but are really huge monsters even the smallest one, at least they got some pics of that one with pple alongside it and that is eye opening <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> I say <br /><br />I mean is it 'almost impossible' to use because it gives too close up view and therefore too shaky picture that is hard to stabilize or too enlarged or maybe not too enlarged view at all since I suspect this type of scope gather light but doesn't magnify much at all? or is that the case of it being hard to find what you want to look at since it brings you way too close and even finderscope is too strong (magnifying too much)?<br /><br />of course then there is the upside down thing which might be bothersome, personally I imagine I wouldn't like it much with planet viewing either (you get to know the Moon for example and then you get disoriented when you see it upside down), only for deep sky it doesn't matter how one looks at stuff I suppose<br /><br />also I read on this thread about this eye relief for astigmatism (which I do have) because friend of mine has binoculars with adjustable eye relief (it says that on it) and it is I suppose that 'screw out shade' that is called that... but I found I with my astigmatism and my glasses on I get better viewing (I feel more like 'being there') when I screw the eye pieces so that the 'chimney shade' are most shallow - which I take is short eye rel <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
I

ianke

Guest
Hi vanDivX,<br /><br />I am not the best person to answer this, but (for Dobs)<br /><br />1. the view is inverted and upside down and hard to correct like in other scopes<br />2. they do not lend themselve to the high degree of portability needed to use as a spotter.<br />3. well I don't have a 3.<img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br />4. Oh yeah! I think that reflecters in general wash out the view in bright light. edit:<br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
V

vandivx

Guest
thanks for the low down on that eye relief which is likely a bit confusing to others with glasses<br /><br />somehow one doesn't intuitively think of his eye as just another 'lens', perhaps then we should have some head holder into which you would strap your head and adjust its position by adjusting screws to bring the sight to exact focus <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /><br /><br />vanDivX <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
M

mcsquire

Guest
Hi folks,<br /><br />I brought a Celestron Powerseeker 127 EQ which is a little 5" Newtonian reflector. I have always wanted a telescope since I was a kid and decided to take the plunge. I thought this would satisfy me for a while being Celestron are a well known brand. Mistake! It's only any good for observing the moon! or the lady across the road getting changed at night! Otherwise it's not all that in my limited experience.<br /><br />Firstly the mounts naff. Everything is viewed in wobble vision! It definitely needs a heavier tripod. Secondly it comes with various eyepieces. The only one it's any good with is the low powered eyepiece. If you use the higher magnification ones supplied its too dark and wobbly. It just doesn't collect enough light. I have absolutely no chance seeing objects such as the planets. Everything small you observe has a nasty haze around the object. Total waste of money in my opinion.<br /><br />I'm now about to build a 10" Dobsonian. That seems the common sense solution to my problem. 10" as its still portable. Plus I can make a sturdy base and eliminate the wobble vision. I've been putting prices together for the components and in theory it shouldn't cost much more to build than this 5" Celestron cost me in the first place.<br /><br />My advise would be buy as good as you can for the money and don't skimp! You do get what you pay for! Join a local astronomy club and go to a couple of star gazing meetings. At least you will see what options you have available to you before wasting any of your hard earned money.<br /><br />Cheers,<br /><br />Tone
 
I

ianke

Guest
Hi crazyeddie,<br /><br />Wow. You are going to do a hand made. Are you going all the way and push your own glass ? That can entail a lot of work as I understand it. Bought or hand made parts asside best of luck in this endevor. <br /><br />Ianke <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
M

mcsquire

Guest
Thanks for the advice! I have a rather old but good book written by Patrick Moore. It's actually called how to build a telescope. That tells you how to grind your own mirrors. I think I will take the pre-made avenue as I am sure a optical engineering firm will make a better job than I ever can by rubbing two pieces of glass together.<br /><br />I will let you know how I get along with the project.<br /><br />Thanks,<br /><br />Tone
 
I

ianke

Guest
Hi MCSquire,<br />I apologize to you, I thought I was answering Someone else. <br /><br />To build your own telescope is a cool thing to do though. Do you plan it to be a solid tube or a truss type? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
S

saurc

Guest
Hi,<br /><br />I'm not looking to buy my first telescope, I already have a 6'' dobsonian. However lately I 'discovered' a 10'' motor mount telescope that had gone all rusted etc. I had it repaired quite a bit but the mirror is terrible scratched.. I can't see anything with it. Is it beyond repair?
 
T

Testing

Guest
I have to do some digging, let me get back to you tonight with the name of a place that can polish and coat optics or you can go to thje ATM site to learn how to do it yourself. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

Latest posts