Mars Loses Its Water Even Faster Than Anyone Thought

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Why is Mars dry? Water might escape the atmosphere more effectively than previously thought, potentially helping to explain how the Red Planet lost its vast oceans.

Mars Loses Its Water Even Faster Than Anyone Thought : Read more
The report said "All in all, if water vapor can regularly float so high into the Martian atmosphere without being limited by condensation, "we might envision that water escape on Mars has been more way more effective than previously thought," Montmessin said. Future research can better quantify how much water is entering the upper atmosphere and model its behavior, so scientists can better understand how the water vapor may escape into space, Montmessin said."

My observation - Very intriguing report here on Mars losing water. 4 billion years ago, Mars is said to be warm and wet yet there is that Faint Young Sun. 2 billion years ago or so for Earth, that Faint Young Sun is said to have created the *snow ball* Earth :)

Future studies should be very interesting.
 
Jan 17, 2020
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Condensation is dependent on pressure, and as Mars has very little, then it shouldn't be a surprise that there is a lack of condensation.
Mars is covered in what has been dubbed, ''blueberries'' billions of small balls, of unknown origin.
In ''Worlds in Collision'' Velikovsky describes the likely phenomena that would occur, when planets pass close to one another, and their magnetic fields interact, massive lightning bolts, that would scour the surface like electric discharge machining. This would leave ''weld spatter'' or in this case ''blueberries.''
So, the massive depression on Mars, may not have been a sea/ocean bed, but the result of electric discharge erosion. Therefore the seas/oceans may not have existed.
 
Jan 17, 2020
15
1
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The report said "All in all, if water vapor can regularly float so high into the Martian atmosphere without being limited by condensation, "we might envision that water escape on Mars has been more way more effective than previously thought," Montmessin said. Future research can better quantify how much water is entering the upper atmosphere and model its behavior, so scientists can better understand how the water vapor may escape into space, Montmessin said."

My observation - Very intriguing report here on Mars losing water. 4 billion years ago, Mars is said to be warm and wet yet there is that Faint Young Sun. 2 billion years ago or so for Earth, that Faint Young Sun is said to have created the *snow ball* Earth :)

Future studies should be very interesting.
The planet Earth emerged from its last ''Snowball'' event 600 million years ago. It also goes through ice ages that last 50-150 million years, and occur at roughly 150 million year intervals. These are caused by the Solar system passing through the arms of the Galaxy during its orbit of the galaxy, which is independent of the rotation of the galaxy. (This would suggest that the Solar system joined the Milky Way from elsewhere .) The period of this orbit is 600 million years approx. So the present Ice Age, which commenced some 40-50 million years ago, may well be a repeat ''Snowball'' event!
 

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