Martian sky is BLUE, tell NASA!

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extrasense

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The supposed color calibration procedures, are absolutely bogus. <br />Instead, without calibration the colors are reproduced correctly.<br />Compare the picture of calibration target, taken directly on Earth, with the same restored from filtered images from Mars. A remarkable reproduction of the colors it is!<br />http://mywebpages.comcast.net/mycommon/color-e.jpg<br />http://mywebpages.comcast.net/mycommon/colors.jpg<br /><br />And, here is the true sky color on Mars:<br />http://mars.gh.wh.uni-dortmund.de/mer/opportunity/413/tn/1P164843722EFF51Y2P2663L5M1_L4L5L5L5L6.jpg.html<br /><br />e <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> s<br /><br /><br />
 
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odysseus145

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But now the ground is black. Mars is red. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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tom_hobbes

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Red <i>is</i> the new black. Haven't you heard? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#339966"> I wish I could remember<br /> But my selective memory<br /> Won't let me</font><font size="2" color="#99cc00"> </font><font size="3" color="#339966"><font size="2">- </font></font><font size="1" color="#339966">Mark Oliver Everett</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
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extrasense

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Do you mean the solar panel shadow on the right being "black"?<br /><br />It is of the same color as top left, just the brightness is low<br /><br />e <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> s<br /><br /><br />
 
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telfrow

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This has been discussed, at length, in another thread. See "A Question About Cydonia, Parts One and Two, " etc. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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telfrow

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And BTW, why start this thread at SDC? You've got the same one going at the other site...<br /><br />Taking too much heat over there? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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extrasense

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----This has been discussed-----<br /><br />It depens what meaning of this is <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br />So, everyone must agree that the Martian sky is BLUE?<br /><br />ES<br />
 
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telfrow

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Read the threads. You decide. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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najab

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ES, you've been asked already not to use derogatory terms to refer to NASA - please <b>NO NOT</b> do it again.
 
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extrasense

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I take that this time everyone agrees with me.<br /><b>No opponents whatsoever!</b><br /><br />Martian sky is BLUE!<br /><br /><br />e <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> s<br />
 
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odysseus145

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Do you mean the solar panel shadow on the right being "black"?<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />No, your last picture shows a blue sky and a black ground.<br /><br />btw, I don't think anyne agrees with you. You're just being ignored. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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spacechump

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That image is a composite of three filters. The trouble is that when an image is taken through a filter, the ccd gets full saturation of the wavelength filtered out. That's now how WE see color. We have more green sensitive cells in our eyes than red or blue cells. That's the way digital cameras work as well. They have twice the amount of green sensitive ccd elements than blue or red combined. This gives the best representation of what the human eye really sees. But why go to the trouble of putting a flimsy, almost worthless camera on the rovers when we get much more of a science return with a dozen visible/near visible filter options in which to take images? Approximate color (that is balancing the amount of green, red and blue) works well enough for me.
 
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extrasense

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-- black ground --<br /><br />It is not black, it is brownish with low intensity.<br />If you increase intensity of whole image, the sky will become more close to white. This is a result of low depth color ...<br />
 
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extrasense

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---- Approximate color (that is balancing the amount of green, red and blue) works well enough for me. ----<br /><br />As long as sky is blue ....<br /><br />e <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> s<br />
 
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spacechump

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Umm...the sky would most likely BE bluish if it wasn't for a good deal of dust in the air. You wouldn't see a blue sky on Mars with your own eyes though. They wouldn't pick up enough blue light.
 
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extrasense

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--- the sky would most likely BE bluish if it wasn't for a good deal of dust in the air ---<br /><br />You insist on the standing on your head here.<br />Since the <b>blue sky is a fact</b>, proven by the color filtered images, there is not that much dust to be expected in the Martian atmosphere.<br />It is consistent with the fact, that because of the low density of Martian atmosphere, the dust over there sets down 5 times faster than on Earth.<br /><br />ES<br />
 
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nacnud

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<font color="yellow">It is consistent with the fact, that because of the low density of Martian atmosphere, the dust over there sets down 10 times faster than on Earth.<br /><br /><font color="white">Do you have a reference for this? I would have though that the lower gravity and the lack of moisture in the Martian atmosphere would counteract the low pressure and the atmosphere would be dustier that Earths.<br /></font></font>
 
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telfrow

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This has been posted here before (and it's been posted elsewhere <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" />). It explains the color issue fairly well:<br /><br />http://www.atsnn.com/story/30048.html<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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extrasense

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>I would have though that the lower gravity and the lack of moisture in the Martian atmosphere would counteract the low pressure and the atmosphere would be dustier that Earths.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />You are right about lower gravity, so I have to make it 7 times instead of 10. <br /><br />Velocity = C * sqrt( Weight/AirDensity )<br /><br />where coefficient C depends on the shape of a particle.<br /><br />The same particle on Mars will have half the Weight, a a hundred times lower AirDensity compared with Earth.<br /><br />Which means its falling Velocity will be sqrt(50) =~ 7 times higher.<br /><br />http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/termv.html<br /><br />ES<br /><br />
 
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nacnud

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Ok so have you allowed for the amount of dust in the Martian soil and therefore the amount entering the atmosphere.<br /><br />2/3 of the Earths surface is water, and a lot of the remaining surface is vegetated or covered in other ways, ie ice. <br /><br />It is quite possible that the flux of dust entering the Martian atmosphere is 7 times that entering the Earths atmosphere for a given surface area. <br />
 
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extrasense

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--- It is quite possible that the flux of dust entering the Martian atmosphere is 7 times that entering the Earths atmosphere for a given surface area ---<br /><br />This is a pure speculation on your part, is not it?<br /><br />I would submit to you that dust is the most unlikely reason to produce even coloring of the Martian atmosphere, that is being observed. <br />The reason that sky can be seen with reddish color, is that often the infrared is bundled with red, and then it is displayed as red.<br />The infrared color of Martian sky, it is due to the greehouse effect caused by CO2 atmosphere.<br /><br />e <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> s<br /><br />
 
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nacnud

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<font color="red"> It is quite possible that the flux of dust entering the Martian atmosphere is 7 times that entering the Earths atmosphere for a given surface area <br /><br /><font color="yellow">This is a pure speculation on your part, is not it? <br /><br /><font color="white">Yes it is speculative, hence the ‘quite possible’ rather than more affirmative language <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /></font></font></font>
 
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najab

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><i>This is a pure speculation on your part, is not it?</i><p>No, it's not pure speculation. We <b>have</b> observed frequent global dust storms on Mars, we have not observed such storms on the Earth. Therefore it is not speculation to say that more dust is thrown up into the Martian atmosphere than the Terran. It was a reasoned guess that the difference might be as much as seven times.</p>
 
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extrasense

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Do you understand, that to have comparable dusting power, winds on the Mars surface must be much faster? <br /><br />If it is a matter of religious believe for you, it is not to be argued. Otherwise, you do not have a case.<br /><br />e <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> s<br />
 
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