More (much more) on "White Rock" on Mars.

Status
Not open for further replies.
E

exoscientist

Guest
<p>&nbsp;Emily Lakdawalla of the Planetary Society has written some nice extensive summaries of the conclusions drawn on the enigmatic formation known as "White Rock" on Mars from&nbsp; the Mars orbiter missions:</p><p><br />White Rock through the ages: Mariner 9, 1972<br />By Emily Lakdawalla<br />Feb. 8, 2008 | 13:31 PST | 21:31 UTC<br />http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001322/<br /><br />White Rock through the ages: Viking (1976-1980)<br />By Emily Lakdawalla<br />Feb. 13, 2008 | 12:10 PST | 20:10 UTC<br />http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001325/<br /><br />White Rock through the ages: Mars Global Surveyor (1997-2006)<br />By Emily Lakdawalla<br />Feb. 22, 2008 | 10:24 PST | 18:24 UTC<br />http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001335/<br /><br />White Rock through the ages: 2001 Mars Odyssey (2001-present)<br />By Emily Lakdawalla<br />Mar. 4, 2008 | 16:23 PST | Mar. 5 00:23 UTC<br />http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001347/<br /><br />White Rock through the ages: Mars Express (2004-present)<br />By Emily Lakdawalla<br />Mar. 27, 2008 | 15:28 PDT | 22:28 UTC<br />http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001381/<br /><br />Newly released archive of Mars Express HRSC data, part 2<br />By Emily Lakdawalla<br />May. 3, 2006 | 18:12 PDT | May. 4 01:12 UTC<br />http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00000562/</p><p>&nbsp;The next to last link above, about the Mars Express observations, has a link to a nice Digital Terrain Model (DTM) 3D flyover of White Rock.</p><p>&nbsp;Emily's summary of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter results on White Rock is upcoming. However, some CRISM observations from MRO on White Rock are available here:</p><p>Poll(a)ck Crater's White Rock.<br />http://crism.jhuapl.edu/gallery/featuredImage/image.php?gallery_id=2&image_id=124</p><p>&nbsp;None of the spectrometer readings on any of the spacecraft show White Rock to be composed of evaporites or aqueous minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, clays, or salts. The CRISM observations also show it to be covered with olivine, although from my reading of the news release they are saying this is just a cover of some indurated material composed of sand or dust underneath.</p><p>&nbsp;Still the MER rovers did not initially see aqueous minerals either. These were revealed when the dust covers on the rocks were removed by the drills or when the wheels churned up the soil.</p><p>&nbsp;Another interesting fact mentioned is that "White Rock" is not really white but appears that way in comparison to the surrounding dark terrain within Poll(a)ck crater. However, I found it interesting that it is still lighter than most of the surrounding terrain even outside the crater. The exceptions might be notable. There are some small outcrops that may be the same material as White Rock. But there is a large area to the upper right of Poll(a)ck crater that has the same comparitively light color as White Rock. It's visible in the images in "Newly released archive of Mars Express HRSC data, part 2" article:</p><p>&nbsp;<br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/8/5/18e484df-58aa-455b-953e-bdd8f5316edf.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p>&nbsp; Anyone know if this area has the same thermal inertia readings as White Rock?</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob Clark<br />&nbsp; </p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

E
Replies
0
Views
1K
Astronomy
EarthlingX
E
M
Replies
1
Views
612
R
S
Replies
1
Views
1K
J

Latest posts