Naked-Eye Comets

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markj_87

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I did a search for this and didn't really find anything...<br /><br />I remember seeing Comet Hale-Bopp a few years back (I don't remember it too well, however. I was only 10 at the time and not too interested in astronomy then), and looking at pictures of it now it seems a shame I couldn't appreciate it more. Being born in 1987, I also just missed Comet Halley's last visit. <br /><br />What I'm wondering is if anyone knows when the next significant naked eye comet will be visible? A website with projected arrival dates of near-future naked eye comets would be great. I know it's difficult to predict how bright they will be and such (if I remember correctly, Hale Bopp was not predicted to be particularly bright at all, and another comet (Hyukate or something?) failed to meet expectations). But surely astronomers can forecast almost exactly when close or prominent comets will reach us. I read recently that we're possibly overdue a good naked eye comet.<br /><br />Thanks in advance to anyone who has anyone to contribute here.
 
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markj_87

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Ah yes, Kahoutek was the one which failed to meet expectations. I got a little confused there.<br /><br />So was Hale-Bopp the last significant comet? And what is the usual time period between when a comet is discovered and when it becomes visible from earth? Have astronomers located any comets fairly recently which will become naked eye comets in the forseeable future? Sorry about all the questions, but this really interests me and I would like to learn more.<br /><br />Thanks.
 
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vogon13

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IIRC, it was IRAS-Araki-Alcock (sorry if spelling is off) that was only naked eye for a day our two, but was so close to earth its' motion was evident from hour to hour.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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bonus

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I claim the asteroid belt in our solar system as being the remains of the planet Mupiter. Mupiter is what use to be the planet between Mars and Jupiter many years ago. Of course Mars is the biggest piece of Mupiter. Have fun and keep an eye on the skies.
 
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vogon13

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There was speculation in the sixties and seventies about Vesta being a satellite of the 'lost planet'.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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markj_87

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Thanks for those links guys, some of that was very interesting. I'm now trying to get my head around 1965 Ikeya-Seki at -15 magnitude! That must have been some spectacle.
 
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vogon13

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I missed that one, but do remember comet Bennet as being quite spectacular, and having established for me, my reference appearance for a big bright comet. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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vogon13

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I know this sounds shallow, but I am far more likely to stay up late to see something than to get up early. Comet Bennet was an unusual case, my parents made me get up early for a weekend trip, otherwise, I would never have seen it.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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markj_87

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>I, too, was only 9 when Ikeya-Seki appeared, before my interest in Astronomy really started to bud, but I could kick myself for missing it.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />I feel the same about Hale-Bopp. I was only 10 when it appeared, and although I did see it, it was only because my dad pointed it out and I really wasn't very interested. Now I see pictures of it, and wish I'd taken more of an interest (although that's asking a lot from a 10 year old, I know). If a similar comet appeared now, I'd most likely be out every night viewing it.
 
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markj_87

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Has anyone seen Comet Pojmanski yet? The weather's been awful here so there's been no point me getting up at dawn to have a look. If a clear morning is predicted anytime soon I'll be outside with the binoculars.<br /><br />There's a good picture of it here: http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2006/26feb06/drummond1.jpg<br /><br />Apparently it has brightened more than expected (probably due to over-cautious estimates) and is now at the fringe of naked eye visibility at 5th magnitude.
 
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qso1

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I'm not aware of any naked eye comets coming anytime soon but I haven't kept up as much. I recall seeing Comet Bennet, Kohoutek, West, Haley, Hyakutake, and Hale Bopp. Bennet was an unexpected first comet that was in the spring of 1970 and I was an early teen then. I was anticipating Haley even then because it was the only Comet I knew about till Bennet. Then I saw Comet West. When I finally saw Haley. It was the worst because in 1986, it was pointed almost head on to us, the tail not very visible at all. The best were West and Hale Bopp. I saw Hale Bopp at one point from a shopping mall despite the street lights. Although it was barely visible under those conditions, Haley I had to look at through binocs in an area with virtually no light pollution and still had a tough time seeing it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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igorsboss

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Hyakutake was the first comet I photographed. I even made a 4-hour time-lapse movie of it, capturing an interesting "disconnection event" in progress.<br /><br />I managed to see it in dark during an "arctic blast", which gave crystal clear seeing. For one spectacular night, it totally filled the sky. I was not prepared for what I saw. Hale-Bopp seemed tiny in comparison.
 
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el_naso

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how can I spot it? (hi, teen enthusiast here <img src="/images/icons/tongue.gif" />) for how long will it stay in Capricorn? is it really at magnitude 5? and can it be seen in the southern hemisphere? anithing else i should know?
 
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