NASA to Announce Success of Long Galactic Hunt

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bearack

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The Chandra x-ray scope is for detecting high energy events.&nbsp; I doubt it has the proper filters or capabilities to detecting something that cold.&nbsp; <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV><br /><br />But a large rogue gas giant could emit a large amount of energy, couldn't it?</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><img id="06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/14/06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" /></p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>But a large rogue gas giant could emit a large amount of energy, couldn't it?&nbsp; <br /> Posted by bearack</DIV></p><p>I thinks it's possible for gas giants to produce their own x-rays, but probably not in sufficient amounts to be detected at such distances.&nbsp; Certainly, if the gas giant was associated with a star, then cosmic ray collisions with the gas giant's magnetosphere would generate copious amounts of x-rays to be detectable.&nbsp; But, by definition, a rogue planet is not associated or under the influence of a star.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><font size="2">They've Discovered Nemesis!!! RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!!</font></p><p><font size="2">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemesis_%28star%29</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><font size="2">It could be they've found a way to deflect the "Chaos Cloud"</font></p><p><font size="2">http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/64434/chaos_cloud_to_hit_in_2014.html</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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Philotas

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>They've Discovered Nemesis!!! RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!!http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemesis_%28star%29 <br />Posted by boris1961</DIV><br /><br />Doubt running is going to you any good. But Nemesis, a red or brown dwarf, would of course emit much less electromagnetic radiation in the X-ray spectrum than in visible light&nbsp; (which you probably know <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif" border="0" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" />). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>They've Discovered Nemesis!!! RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!!http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemesis_%28star%29 <br /> Posted by boris1961</DIV></p><p>Nemesis doesn't quite fall into the "crackpot" category.&nbsp; I've watched a few lectures by Dr. Muller on youtube (thanks Dr.Rocket) and he seems to be rather grounded.&nbsp; He'll be the first to you tell it may not exist.&nbsp; It's a compelling idea, but a difficult one to pursue. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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bearack

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Nemesis doesn't quite fall into the "crackpot" category.&nbsp; I've watched a few lectures by Dr. Muller on youtube (thanks Dr.Rocket) and he seems to be rather grounded.&nbsp; He'll be the first to you tell it may not exist.&nbsp; It's a compelling idea, but a difficult one to pursue. <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV><br /><br />Whelp, today's the day.&nbsp; Can't wait to see what the big hub bub is all about.&nbsp; I'll probably be disappointed.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><img id="06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/14/06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" /></p> </div>
 
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spin0

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SPOILER:<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Found this in NASA-TV Media Channel programming list:<br /><br /><br /><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>ITEM 1 - DISCOVERY OF MOST RECENT SUPERNOVA IN OUR GALAXY - CXC (NEW)<br /><br />The most recent supernova in our Galaxy, known as G1.9+0.3, has been discovered by tracking the rapid expansion of its remains. <br />This result, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA), has implications for understanding how <br />often supernovas explode in the Milky Way galaxy.<br /><br />ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt</DIV><br /><br /><br />I wonder why it hasn't been discovered visually earlier. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Smersh

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>SPOILER:Found this in NASA-TV Media Channel programming list:I wonder why it hasn't been discovered visually earlier. <br /> Posted by spin0</DIV></p><p>Anyone still listening?</p><p>"HEY HEY DON'T GO I WANNA TALK TO YOU GUYS !!!!" &nbsp;</p><p>Then heard in the background "we just had a coupla loonies ..."</p><p>Transmission then ended.&nbsp; <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif" border="0" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <h1 style="margin:0pt;font-size:12px">----------------------------------------------------- </h1><p><font color="#800000"><em>Lady Nancy Astor: "Winston, if you were my husband, I'd poison your tea."<br />Churchill: "Nancy, if you were my wife, I'd drink it."</em></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Website / forums </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>SPOILER:Found this in NASA-TV Media Channel programming list:I wonder why it hasn't been discovered visually earlier. <br />Posted by spin0</DIV><br /><br />"The recent supernova explosion was not seen with optical telescopes because it occurred close to the center of the galaxy and is embedded in a dense field of gas and dust. This made the object about a trillion times fainter, in optical light, than an unobscured supernova. However, the remnant it caused can be seen by X-ray and radio telescopes. " <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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lildreamer

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>"The recent supernova explosion was not seen with optical telescopes because it occurred close to the center of the galaxy and is embedded in a dense field of gas and dust. This made the object about a trillion times fainter, in optical light, than an unobscured supernova. However, the remnant it caused can be seen by X-ray and radio telescopes. " <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV><br /><br />so what was the announcement - anybody watched? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Usually with these kinds of announcements, the secret is far less compelling than the dramatic hype generated from all the guessing.&nbsp; <br /> Posted by qso1</DIV></p><p>Nice call Nostradamus... <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-tongue-out.gif" border="0" alt="Tongue out" title="Tongue out" />.</p><p>That was rather anti-climatic.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>so what was the announcement - anybody watched? <br />Posted by lildreamer</DIV><br /><br />It was about the supernova, the most recent in the Milky Way.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/news/08-062.html</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It was about the supernova, the most recent in the Milky Way.&nbsp;http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/news/08-062.html <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>The most recent to have it's light reach us, but certainly not the most recent to have 'happened'.</p><p>(just being facetious, I know you know the difference... <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" />)&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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bearack

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The most recent to have it's light reach us, but certainly not the most recent to have 'happened'.(just being facetious, I know you know the difference... )&nbsp; <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV><br /><br />I was hoping for a little more substance, yah know, like they found Planet X or a giant alien ship or Michael Jackson's home world.&nbsp; Oh well!</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><img id="06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/14/06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" /></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">I was hoping for a little more substance, yah know, like they found Planet X or a giant alien ship or Michael Jackson's home world.&nbsp; Oh well!&nbsp; <br />Posted by bearack</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">Oh well, I too was hoping for something more interesting. Never mind, we have new Titan stuff to be released from Cassini & the Mars Phoenix Lander arrival is soon, so its not all bad. </font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">No reflection on spin0 though, as spin0 would not have known what it was, prior to announcement.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">It is one hell of an anticlimax.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p><font color="#800080">:Found this in NASA-TV Media Channel programming list:I wonder why it hasn't been discovered visually earlier. Posted by spin0</font></p><p>Probably because it occured long ago and may not have been recorded by the people of its time or was recorded and the recording medium lost.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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neuvik

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<p>How is the youngest supernova not interesting, or amazing?&nbsp; It took an amazing combined effort to find the thing, it used two services CHANDRA and NRAOVLA, and will lead to our understanding of the of the universe, fusion, and so much more.&nbsp;&nbsp; I heard this on the radio yesterday and I was amazed at the effort, an amature couldn't find it, the light contamination from the core was distorting it. &nbsp; Also the fact that no recent supernova from our galaxy have been discovered asides the one that occured in 1600s; and that it is predicated that two supernovas occur each year, well just speaks to the great effort these scientists have made. &nbsp;</p><p>Greater knowledge of the Universe;&nbsp; Greater chance of us dominating it!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">I don't think I'm alone when I say, "I hope more planets fall under the ruthless domination of Earth!"</font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff">SDC Boards: Power by PLuck - Ph**king Luck</font></p> </div>
 
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spin0

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Obviously, with it being tied to the Chandra xray observatory, it's involved with very high energies. Posted by derekmcdAnd as such, will probably only generate extreme exitement within the community of researchers it may affect. The average person and media won't give a crap. <br /> Posted by qso1</DIV><br />You were absolutely right!</p><p>Seems like the actual annoncement was taken as an anticlimax and disappointment in the general public (on various forums). But the discovery itself is a *major* discovery and indeed is interesting for astronomers and astrophycisists (and me too!)</p><p>1. By it's young age G1.9+0.3 fills a gap in known SN remnants.</p><p>2. It gives little bit more confidence in our estimates of SN frequency in our galaxy.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>(3. I bet there will be more similar discoveries in the future with combined efforts on different wavelenghts.) </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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