New Horizons: Jupiter Encounter. Through 2007.

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anthmartian

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Andrew : That was the truly great thing about the Voyager encounters. They really did give us a whole new solar system. <br /><br />Just as you say, Jupiter and Saturn became whole solar systems in themselves to be explored. Uranus ( Miranda is a world i would like to see a lot more of ), Neptune and Triton too are fascinating places to explore, and should be looked at again soon.<br /><br />With all these amazing places to visit, I ask the question, is there more to be learned from a near future intense exploration of the solar system via robotic probes, than spending probably thousands of billions on manned exploration, or the planning and development for manned space exploration? I know humans on Mars could get through what the Mars Rovers have got through in 3 years, in a single day of working on the red planet ( if they are alive that is! ) . <br /><br />But, look at the cost, and risk. I'm sure if you threw even half the budget of the first manned mission to Mars at a comprehensive robotic Mars program we would have nearly all the answers we want.<br /><br />I know this is a whole other subject in itself. I just seems appropriate here though to bring it up initially. maybe it could be discussed further in another topic?<br /><br />and Andrew, thanks again for your kind words about the images and web site. It makes it a truly rewarding pass time to know they are enjoyed and appreciated. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />P.S, waiting for your image to be approved. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Io imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope in support of the New Horizons Jupiter encounter. Mid February 2007.<br />=========================================================<br />The ultraviolet image on the right shows a big plume (Tvashtar) rising above the surface, not far from the north pole. Though Io is not much bigger than Earth's geologically dead Moon, Io's interior is kept molten due to the gravitational tug of Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites. <br /><br />Hubble will continue to photograph Io, as well as Jupiter over the next month, as the New Horizons spacecraft flies past Jupiter. New Horizons is en route to Pluto, and made its closest approach to Jupiter on February 28, 2007. <br /><br />Through combined remote imaging by Hubble and in situ measurements by New Horizons, the two missions will enhance each other scientifically, allowing scientists to learn more about the Jovian atmosphere, the aurorae, and Jupiter's charged-particle environment and its interaction with the solar wind. <br /><br />Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Spencer and K. Jessup, (Southwest Research Institute), and the Space Telescope Science Institute <br /><br /><br />The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore conducts Hubble science operations. The Institute is operated for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., Washington. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took this true-color view of Jupiter in support of the New Horizons Mission. The image was taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on February 17, 2007, using the planetary camera detector. Jupiter's trademark belts and zones of high- and low-pressure regions appear in crisp detail. Circular convection cells can be seen at high northern and southern latitudes. Atmospheric features as small as 250 miles (400 km) across can be discerned.<br /><br />Hubble will continue to photograph Jupiter as well as its volcanically active moon, Io, over the next month as the New Horizons spacecraft flies past Jupiter. New Horizons is en route to Pluto, and made its closest approach to Jupiter on February 28, 2007.<br /><br />Through combined remote imaging by Hubble and in situ measurements by New Horizons, the two missions will support each other scientifically to learn more about the Jovian atmosphere, the aurorae, and the charged-particle environment of Jupiter and its interaction with the solar wind.<br /><br />For more information, contact:<br /><br />Ray Villard<br />Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.<br />410-338-4514 (phone), villard@stsci.edu (e-mail)<br /><br />Keith Noll<br />Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.<br />410-338-1828 (phone), noll@stsci.edu (e-mail) <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Chandra X Ray Space Observatory & Hubble Space Telescope image Jupiter in support of the New Horizons encounter.<br /><br />Chandra imaged the Jovian Aurora in X Rays & these have been mantaged onto the Hubble Space Telescope image of Jupiter.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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New Horizons captured this unique view of Jupiter's moon Io with its color camera - the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) - at 00:25 UT on March 1, 2007, from a range of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles). The image is centered at Io coordinates 4 degrees south, 162 degrees west, and was taken shortly before the complementary Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) photo of Io released on March 13, which had higher resolution but was not in color.<br /><br />Like that LORRI picture, this processed image shows the nighttime glow of the Tvashtar volcano and its plume rising 330 kilometers (200 miles) into sunlight above Io's north pole. However, the MVIC picture reveals the intense red of the glowing lava at the plume source and the contrasting blue of the fine dust particles in the plume (similar to the bluish color of smoke), as well as more subtle colors on Io's sunlit crescent. The lower parts of the plume in Io's shadow, lit only by the much fainter light from Jupiter, are almost invisible in this rendition. Contrast has been reduced to show the large range of brightness between the plume and Io's disk.<br /><br />A component of the Ralph imaging instrument, MVIC has three broadband color filters: blue (480 nanometers), red (620 nm) and infrared (850 nm); as well as a narrow methane filter (890 nm). Because the camera was designed for the dim illumination at Pluto, not the much brighter sunlight at Jupiter, the red and infrared filters are overexposed on Io's dayside. This image is therefore composed from the blue and methane filters only, and the colors shown are only approximations to those that the eye would see. Nevertheless, the human eye would easily see the red color of the volcano and the blue color of the plume.<br /><br />Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute<br /> <br />=================================================================================<br /><br />First actual colour image f <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Blow up & enhancement of the above Io colour image from New Horizons.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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anthmartian

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Exciting stuff! <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />still waiting for approval to see your images Andrew.<br /><br />I just updated my website, and came along here. If I had to put my money on somebody beating me to the New Horizons data...it would be you! *L*<br /><br />I have a larger scale version of this enhanced, blended image on my home pages.<br /><br />http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth<br /><br />This is scaled down, only slightly for the forums here. It's a collection of some of the sizes, and versions of the image I used to make the final colour picture, top left. Original release from New Horizons web site is bottom left.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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jmilsom

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Wow. I just saw this image on the jhuapl site. Can't wait to see what you guys can do with it enhancement wise! <br /><br />Edited six hours later: I guess there are no Mods active in the Eurasian zone today. I look forward to seeing the images. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi Anthmartian & jmilsom.<br /><br />You are both not wrong there. This is not just exciting, but is absolutely thrilling stuff!!!! <br /><br />Thanks shuttleguy. I enjoy doing these images & sharing them very much. <br /><br />Hi all,<br /><br />Below is a blowup & colour enhancement of the plume from the Tvashtar volcano on the Jupiter moon Io, as seen by New Horizons. Tvashtar is of the Pillanian type (short lived & violent).<br /><br />The blue scattered / reflected sunlight in the dust plume is very evident, as is the reddish molten silicate rock lava fountain, being thrown up from the caldera itself Tvashtar Catena. The blue colour is from raleigh scattering, the same reason that the Earth's skies are blue (assuming daytime & weather permitting). This shows how tiny the minus 146 Celsius, Sulphur Dioxide ice crystals are (would have been hot when erupted, but cool extremely quickly once ejected)!!!<br /><br />Please see this excellent informative post & image contributed by rlb2, for a previous version of this image taken by the LORRI camera.<br /><br />Image below taken from Anthmartian's website: This Island Earth & all credit goes to Anthmartian. <br /><br />Please see his excellent & growing website:<br />http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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anthmartian

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Andrew,<br /><br />You're so right, it is thrilling! I thought it was exciting watching the counter tick down to close approach, and looking at, and working on the approach images around that time.<br /><br />But this mission gets better, and better! I know its been frustrating with data trickling back to Earth throughout February, and March, it will also continue throughout April, and May too. But, it is so worth the wait. I'm not sure why, but i have not been this excited for a very long time about a space craft. Imagine experiencing all this from New Horizons when it is truly in uncharted unexplored territory at Pluto and the Kuiper belt!<br /><br />I have been so busy with New Horizons, i've not even checked the Mars Rovers site today! in over three years that has not happened before. *L*<br /><br />*wanders off to Rover site, Cassini, Mars Express ( like they ever update! more than once a year! Please look at NASA sites ESA!!! ) etc, etc.* <br /><br />Please check out page 11! If i knew i was starting a new page i wouldnt have posted. Sorry. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi Anthmartian.<br /><br />The same bug has hit me with New Horizons!!! The Jupiter system is never boring & that Jupiter & Io are constantly changing!!! There is a chance too that ice encrusted Europa may have some activity!!!!<br /><br />This encounter has shown that New Horizons is a beautifully built, engineered & operated craft. Alan Stern & his team, must be mightily relieved now that the chances of a successful mission at the Pluto system are near on 100%. New Horizons has already performed magnificently. <br /><br />Navigation is spot on, instruments working 100%, on board computer, despite a couple of minor upsets, is working well, etc.<br /><br />Hi all,<br /><br />Below is another view of Io, taken on: Tuesday 27th February 2007, from a distance of 2.7 million KM / 1.67 million miles, by the LORRI camera on board New Horizons.<br /><br />This view of Io, clearly shows the Pele ejecta ring & confirms what was seen a few days earlier from much further away. The Pele ring has become even more elongated in a north to south direction. This is the most elongated that it has ever been seen.<br /><br />Voyager 1 in March 1979, first imaged Pele & the ejecta 'ring' was heart shaped. Voyager 2 four months later in July 1979, saw the Pele 'ring' had changed into a fat oval. The Galileo orbiter imaged this feature several times & each time, it became slightly more elongated. The Pluto bound New Horizons has very clearly shown, that this process has not stopped.<br /><br />The large Pillan Patera dark fall out ring (at the three o clock position on the Pele ring) appears to have been covered up by newer lighter toned sulphur. The volcano itself is clearly visible. <br /><br />The large collapsing mountains Boosaule Montes (Boosaule Mons itself rises 15,800 metres / 52,000 feet above the surrounding terrain) can just be mad out at the 11 o clock position on Pele's ejecta ring. <br /><br />At the six o'clock position another very lofty mountain Egypt Mons can b <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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abq_farside

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Awesome pics - thanks! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><em><font size="1" color="#000080">Don't let who you are keep you from becoming who you want to be!</font></em></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Storm / Great Red Spot spectral images.<br /><br />These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are "false color" pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on Jupiter. A micron is one millionth of a meter. <br /><br />These pictures were taken at 05:58 UT on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 2.9 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). They are centered at 8 degrees south, 32 degrees east in Jupiter "System III" coordinates. The large oval-shaped feature is the well-known Great Red Spot. The resolution of each pixel in these images is about 175 kilometers (110 miles); Jupiter's diameter is approximately 145,000 kilometers (97,000 miles). <br /><br />The image on the left is an altitude map made by assigning the color red to 1.60 microns, green to 1.89 microns and blue to 2.04 microns. Because Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light strongly at 2.04 microns, only clouds at very high altitude will reflect light at this wavelength. Light at 1.89 microns can go deeper in the atmosphere and light at 1.6 microns can go deeper still. In this map, bluish colors indicate high clouds and reddish colors indicate lower clouds. This picture shows, for example, that the Great Red Spot extends far up into the atmosphere.<br /><br />In the image at right, red equals 1.28 microns, green equals 1.30 microns and blue equals 1.36 microns, a range of wavelengths that similarly probes different altitudes in the atmosphere. This choice of wavelengths highlights Jupiter's high-altitude south polar hood of haze. The edge of Jupiter's disk at the bottom of the panel appears slightly non-circular because the left-han <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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anthmartian

Guest
Andrew: Some great detail in those false colour pictures. There is a lot to be said for false colour in that it can really bring a lot out.<br /><br />I attempted to make a similar image from new Horizons data last week. But the images released were taken too far apart in time, the swirling clouds of Jupiter had moved too much for a composite image.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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jmilsom

Guest
The detail in the Jupiter images is amazing. It is interesting that the depcition of Jupiter in films and fiction works simplifies the surface of the planet. To have such detailed pictures means we need to revise our own latent perceptions of the planet. Such an astounding intrciate mosaic of light and colour!!! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. <br /><br />The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter.<br /><br />This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. The night side of Io is illuminated here by light reflected from Jupiter, which is out of the frame to the right. Europa's night side is completely dark, in contrast to Io, because that side of Europa faces away from Jupiter. <br /><br />Here, Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) -high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are barely visible: one from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and one from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The plumes appear blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume.<br /><br />The images are centered at 1 degree north, 60 degrees west on Io, and 0 degrees north, 149 degrees west on Europa. The color <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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anthmartian

Guest
Amazing! <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> It blew up well too. Thanks. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi Anthmartian.<br /><br />Yes, I am quite pleased with it. Not often we get to see the Galileans like that. We are quite used to seeing Saturn's moons like that with Cassini.<br /><br />The similarity in colours between Io & Europa at these wavelengths suggest to me, contamination of the surface ice of Europa by Sulphur erupted from Io's volcanoes.<br /><br />Could be wrong though!!!!<br /><br />Anyway, thought I would carry forward the link to your website as more people might see it here: <br /><br />http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth <br /><br />P.S. Like your Venera Venus surface images!!!!<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

Guest
Sweet! That really is a beautiful image.<br /><br />You're right -- we aren't used to seeing the Galileans like that. Although it's kind of neat to be able to say "we're used to seeing Saturn's moons like that". <img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" /> Five years ago, we weren't used to that at all.<br /><br />This is why I love deep space robotic probes so much. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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dreada5

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Sweet! That really is a beautiful image. <p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Seconded! <img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" />
 
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3488

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Hi CalliArcale. Very true. The dance of Saturn's moons have been impressive to watch, particularly a while back when Dione eclipsed Rhea & Mimas with Janus!!!<br /><br />Hi dreada5, very true also. It is an incredibly beautiful image. It may be described as a Kodak moment!!!<br /><br />I hope many more images like this will follow. I am looking forward to the crescent Jupiter!!!!!<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
Whilst I was trolling around, I found this nice image of the volcanic Jupiter moon Io. <br /><br />Taken with the LORRI camera onboard New Horizons on: Tuesday 27th February 2007. Range 2.7 million kilometres.<br /><br />Pele can be seen at the seven o clock position with ever elongating ejecta ring, with the volcano Babbar Patera almost on the limb highly foreshortened.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
Whilst I was continuing my trolling about this morning, I found this other image of the planet sized, giant cratered Galilean Jupiter moon Callisto.<br /><br />Taken by New Horizons LORRI camera on: Tuesday 27th February 2007, from 4.8 million kilometres. The view shows Callisto from slightly further west then the previously released image.<br /><br />The Valhalla impact basin is very clearly visible & is not so foreshortened as seen from the other image released.<br /><br />Also see this Io image on APOD from 04/04/07. Very similar to what Anthmartian has done.<br /><br />http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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anthmartian

Guest
Andrew, and all. <br /><br />I managed to bring out some more detail on the callisto image shown above. You can just see some hints of those fractures that radiate out from valhalla.<br /><br />I have a couple more images just added to my site too, including Europa.<br /><br />http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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anthmartian

Guest
This is from the actual image Andrew posted above.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em>"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy! Without precise calculations we could fly right through a star, or bounce too close to a supernova and that'd end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?"</em></font></p><p><font color="#33cccc"><strong>Han Solo - 1977 - A long time ago in a galaxy far far away....</strong></font></p><p><br /><br />Click Here And jump over to my site.<br /></p> </div>
 
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