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deapfreeze

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>OK. Look, the last thing I as a "newbie"&nbsp;want to&nbsp;do is make snap assumptions about posters here and if you claim you thought&nbsp;MW's question had to do with a&nbsp;meteor "tail"&nbsp;even though 99.9% of members here know meteors don't look like gray circles and you never even mentioned a "tail," so be it, &nbsp;but as far as I'm concerned&nbsp;your posts here have been just as enigmatic as the object you describe. &nbsp; <br />Posted by archer17</DIV></p><p>I wasn't saying it looked like a meteor tail. I was using the meteor tail as an example showing my thought on what is behind, Like a meteor tail is behind the meteor. I can understand people giving their opinion.. I am not sure what it is but once again travelled from S to N grey disk shape yellowish light in the center. It was not see through extremely fast no clouds in the sky.. I suppose it could be a cloud but like I said before I have never seen any clouds like this before, but I am not saying it's ET or anything I just dont think it was a cloud. I would like to thank those that have given opinons as it give me lots of possibilities to think about and I am sorry my post haven't been clear enough and in the future will try to get more info for you all..:)</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#0000ff"><em>William ( deapfreeze ) Hooper</em></font></p><p><font size="1">http://deapfreeze-amateur-astronomy.tk/</font></p><p> </p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If I may speculate a bit also, let's assume for a moment this was a cloud, like MW suggested. It is reasonable to assume an altitude of some 10 kilometers.Now the angular distance for the object to travel from horizon to horizon for a direct overhead pass would be 6375 km / 6385 km = 0.998.Using inverse cosine would then give 3.2 * 2 degrees from horizon to horizon, which would be the distance of 356 kilometers. Knowing the amount of time it took for the object to travel the distance from horizon to horizon would make it possible to determine whether the speed is something that is possible for a cloud in high altitude.Ofcourse, if the altitude of the object was only 5 kilometers, that would give a distance of 252 kilometers from horizon to horizon.&nbsp;Whenever observing a object in motion in the sky, it would help to time how much time it took for the object to travel from a known star to another, if possible. This would make it possible to determine the angular velocity of the object.Edit: here are the horizontal speeds for a object covering the distance of horizon to horizon in 10 minutes (direct overhead pass):10 Km altitude = 593 m/s5 Km altitude = 420 m/s1 Km altitude = 188 m/s&nbsp; <br />Posted by aphh</DIV><br /><br />Just to clear up, the clouds I that I have seen act like this are very low cumulus clouds. They are usually 2km or below. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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aphh

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Just to clear up, the clouds I that I have seen act like this are very low cumulus clouds. They are usually 2km or below. <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>The speed would probably support a cloud phenomena; it is hardly ever possible to view an object pass overhead from horizon to horizon.</p><p>So let's say you were able to observe a flying phenomena for a five minutes. It would still seem to move relatively fast, but perhaps you only saw 1/4 of the horizon to horizon arc.</p><p>That would make the whole pass from horizon to horizon to last 20 minutes, which at 1 km altitude would be within the air currents velocity range (less than 100 m/s).&nbsp;</p><p>I'm not saying this phenomena was a cloud, but the numbers seem to make it one possible explanation.&nbsp;</p>
 
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