Pictures of moon

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Moon. <br /><br />Mons Hadley Delta. East flank. Layering clearly visible. <br /><br />Apollo 15. <br /><br />Image: AS15-84-11250. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Moon.<br /><br />Surveyor 1.<br /><br />Images own shadow.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Moon. <br /><br />Surveyor 1. <br /><br />Dragon Head Rock. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Moon. <br /><br />Hadley Rille & mountains. <br /><br />Apollo 15. <br /><br />Image: AS15-84-11424. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Moon.<br /><br />Tycho Crater. <br /><br />Lunar Orbiter 5. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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I found this VERY interesting.<br /><br />This image, taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board <br />ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the Oresme crater on the Moon.<br /> <br />AMIE obtained this picture on 30 August 2006 - only 4 days before SMART-1’s final <br />impact on the lunar surface. <br />It was taken from a distance of 1,100 kilometres over the surface, with a ground <br />resolution of 110 metres per pixel. <br />Oresme is located on the Moon’s far side at 42.3° South and 169° East, measuring <br />76 kilometres in diameter, north to south. To the northwest, it borders the Mare Ingenii, <br />and to the south-west, the Chrétien crater. <br /><br />Oresme is framed by a partially bumpy, crooked outer rim, with a flat interior, <br />distinguished from the geological formations outside it. Surrounded by a rough and <br />uneven area, the floor of Oresme is almost a vacant plane, marked only by a few <br />tiny craterlets. <br /><br />The rim is interrupted twice by other craters: to the southeast by the satellite <br />crater 'Oresme K' and by a smaller one along the northern rim. <br /><br />Oresme was carved into the surface in early lunar history, approximately four <br />thousand million years ago. Most of the giant impact basins on the Moon were <br />formed during this period, named the Nectarian age. There is a discussion among <br />scientists whether this corresponds to a spike in the Lunar Late Heavy Bombardment <br />or to a monotonic decrease. <br /><br />“Some theoreticians believe that this bombardment period was caused by comets <br />perturbed by the formation of Uranus and Neptune, while others interpret it as <br />leftover from a population of planet embryos on highly inclined orbits or main belt <br />asteroids†says SMART-1 Project scientist Bernard Foing. <br /><br />“The lunar surface is a history book where we can study scars from this bombardment. <br />It can teach us not only about the accretion processes that formed rocky planet <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Enlargement of Oresme Crater on the moon's farside.<br /><br />42 degrees, 18' South. 167 degrees West.<br /><br />Oresme Crater can never be seen from Earth.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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As a tribute to that amazing achievement Apollo 11.<br /><br />38 Years ago on Friday last week.<br /><br />Apollo 11 landing site by ESA SMART 1.<br /><br />This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board <br />ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the Apollo 11 landing site in the Mare Tranquillitatis <br />on the Moon. <br />AMIE obtained the image on 5 February 2006 from a distance of 1764 kilometres <br />from the surface, with a ground resolution of 159 metres per pixel. The imaged <br />area is centred at a longitude of 23.9º East close to the Moon equator, at 1.7º latitude. <br /><br />The area is close to crater Moltke (outside the field of view of this image) in the <br />Mare Tranquilitatis. The arrow shows the landing site of Apollo 11, where the first men<br />from Earth set foot on another object in our solar system on 20 July 1969. <br />The two prominent craters nearby are named after two of the Apollo 11 astronauts. <br />The first man on the Moon, Armstrong, has a crater named after him outside <br />the field of this image. <br /><br />Credits: ESA/Space-X (Space Exploration Institute).<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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jimcolyer

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Some people hardly notice the moon. But I like walking across the Vanderbilt campus here and looking up at the moon. Earthshine is one of the beautiful sights in nature.
 
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SMART-1 AMIE image of a 275 km area close to the lunar north pole (upper left corner) <br />observed on 29 December 2004 from 5500 km altitude. This shows a heavily cratered <br />highland terrain, and is used to monitor illumination of polar areas, and long shadows <br />cast by large crater rims. Note that this image was obtained with AMIE clear channel. <br /><br />Credits: ESA/SPACE-X Space Exploration Institute.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Very, very true jimcolyer.<br /><br />The moon is hardly noticed these days. people take too much for granted.<br /><br />Sunsets, sunrises, starry skies, the Moon, changing seasons, etc, far too much is taken for<br />granted.<br /><br />I don't though. I ALWAYS look every time. <br /><br />Also in rwecent years, Lunar exploration has been largely sidelined, with the exception<br />of Clementine, Lunar Prospector & SMART 1.<br /><br />With Selene & Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter coming up, another large part of the post Apollo<br />gulf will be filled.<br /><br />Below, Montes Caucasus & Valentine Dome.<br /><br />Apollo 15.<br /><br />CM Endeavour.<br /><br />Image: AS15-91-12372.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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High resolution of Valentine Dome.<br /><br />Apollo 15.<br /><br />CM Endevour.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Marius Domes.<br /><br />Small volcanoes on the moon.<br /><br />Western region. <br /><br />Would have been the landing site of Apollo 14, had Apollo 13 succeded in Fra Mauro.<br /><br />After the Apollo 13 incident, Apollo 14 carried Apollo 13's mission in Fra Mauro.<br /><br />Lunar Orbiter 4.<br /><br />Andrew Brown.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Marius Domes. <br /><br />Eastern region.<br /><br />Small volcanoes on the moon. <br /><br />Lunar Orbiter 4. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Last night at the NJAA, I had the Dob outside looking mostly at the moon and Jupiter.<br /><br />I mentioned a lot how the moon is a treasure each day, since the terminator is in a different spot. Last night one crater was beautifully highlighted with the central peak brightly lit.<br /><br />Jupiter was wonderful, with 3 moons on one side, and one on the other.<br /><br />I had my chunk of the Canyon Diablo meteorite (Meteor Crater, thanx Kev) to put in the kid's hands. And even more fun was putting it into the hands of the "know it all" parents, amazed by the density.<br /><br />I look at the moon with binoculars every night when we can see it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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Hi MeteorWayne.<br /><br />I bet that was a good view through the Dob. The Moon & Jupiter are actually <br />my top two favourites, no bias because JUPITER & IO are involved, he, he <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> , um, <br />there is some bias there actually.<br /><br />I enjoy watching the phases of Venus & Mercury <br />wax & wane & observe Saturn too. <br />Uranus & Neptune are a real thrill too, as so few people have actually SEEN them with their own eyes.<br /><br />Hi all,<br /><br />Found another interesting lunar feature, on the Moon's farside.<br /><br />Text below written by Chuck Wood.<br /><br />Crater Hopmann. This 88 km diameter crater is typical of large ones within the <br />South Pole - Aitken Basin in that its floor is mostly surfaced with mare lavas. <br />Some of the old floor and remnants of concentric rilles peek out at the bottom right, <br />and possibly near the center where there is a small peak and more highly cratered <br />patch of terrain. The very bright ejecta blanket of a small crater is the most <br />conspicous feature on the floor, but another much more delicate brightening is more <br />interesting. The tightly sinuous narrow bright marking southeast of the center looks <br />very much like a lunar swirl. The tight bright swirl appears to extend as two <br />parallel lines across the central area to the opposite wall. A final sight is the <br />unnamed large crater on the south side of the floor which contains an interior <br />ring right up against the crater wall. This is not a traditional concentric crater <br />(CC), but seems a similar type of structure. Like most CCs this double ring crater <br />is on a thin unit of lava, suggesting again that inner rings are somehow associated <br />with an interaction of the impact event with layered target rock. The farside has <br />many secrets yet to divulge.<br /><br />Chuck Wood.<br />----------------------------------------------------------------- <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Mare Orientale. <br /><br />Lunar Orbiter 4.<br /><br />Text below written by Chuck Wood.<br /><br />The most spectacular sight on the Moon is out of view of Earthlings, but tantalizingly near, <br />just over the western limb. The Orientale impact basin is the youngest large impact <br />basin on the Moon and possibly in the entire solar system. Fortunately it was not <br />submerged by lava so that much of the floor structure of a large basin is clear to see. <br />Or it would be if there were a high resolution image. Unfortunately, the basin is so <br />large (930 km across the Cordillera rim) that the entire structure is only visible in <br />a famous, but only medium resolution, <br />Orbiter IV image. <br />Stefan Lammel has now provided the high resolution view that has been needed for nearly <br />40 years by using amateur mosaic making techniques to stitch together the high res<br /> Lunar Orbiter IV frames. This image beautifully shows the two inner rings -<br />the Outer and Inner Rook Mountains - and the lava that leaked to the surface just <br />inside the Outer Rook. Orientale is assumed to be what Imbrium and other basins<br />looked like when they were young and not yet covered by kilometers of mare lava. <br />But I am not sure that if lavas had flooded the floor of Orientale so that only the<br />tallest peaks of the Outer Rook were exposed that they would look like Imbrium’s <br />Pico and Piton. But maybe they would; when we finally get high res digital <br />topography of the Moon we can accurately flood Orientale with virtual lava <br />and look from the surface to see what the Rook peaks look like. I can’t wait.<br /><br />Chuck Wood.<br /><br />---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /><br />Perhaps Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter with the LROC ( the LRO equivalent of HiRISE on MRO),<br />will reveal the true nature of this wonderful feature.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Another interesting lunar feature.<br /><br />The Arrowhead. <br /><br />Lunar Orbiter 4.<br /><br />Using data from Clementine and Lunar Prospector spacecraft, B. Ray Hawke <br />and colleagues from the University of Hawaii recently noticed that AH is not <br />covered by the ejecta of Hansteen and Billy, even though they are close enough that <br />AH should be. Therefore, the Arrowhead must be younger than those craters <br />and the most likely interpretation is that it is an extrusive volcanic mound. <br />The Arrowhead has a size, morphology and texture similar to terrestrial piles of <br />dacitic or rhyolitic lavas that are quite viscous. Spectrally HA differs from mare basalt <br />and has high thorium content, as do terrestrial viscous lavas. Here is an unique <br />non-mare volcanic lunar landform that deserves high resolution imaging! <br /><br />NASA.<br />--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /><br />Perhaps we will with the LROC aboard the LRO. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Wallace Crater.<br /><br />Apollo 17.<br /><br />Lava flooded Wallace Crater as imaged from the CM America.<br /><br />26 kilometres in diameter in the south east part of Mare Imbrium. The surrounding rim<br />reaches a maximum of 400 metres / 1,312 feet in height.<br /><br />Image: AS17-145-2283.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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brellis

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Great pics Andrew, et al! What a joy to see the "elephant in the room" of the night sky! <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br />I posed a question in AtA about Lunar observations - perhaps you have insight! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#ff0000"><em><strong>I'm a recovering optimist - things could be better.</strong></em></font> </p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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Marius hills. Nearly visited during Apollo, still waiting for human explorers.<br /><br />Jon <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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Hi Jon,<br /><br />I hope that they will get them.<br /><br />The Marius Hills offer a real opportunity to grab some real insight into the inner<br />workings of the Moon.<br /><br />I wonder what made NASA decide, for Apollo 14 to carry out Apollo 13's mission?<br /><br />IMO, the Marius Hills are more interesting than Fra Mauro.<br /><br />Certanly the Marius area would be worthy of at least a Lunar Rover.<br /><br />I hope that the LRO will provide some real High resolution images of this area too.<br /><br />Interesting area. At least to a volcano head. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />The Arrowhead is a really interesting feature too. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Inspired by your post, I have found this,<br /><br />---------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /><br />"The slow curvature of the horizon is 250 miles from Orbiter's wide-angle (40°) camera. <br />The crater Marius, at 50.7° W, 12° N, is about 25 miles in diameter and I mile deep. <br />Its floor is surprisingly level.<br /><br />"The central portion of this scene is dominated by a spectacular array of dome structures. <br />These domes are up to 10 miles in diameter and as much as 1500 feet high. <br />Many features are similar in appearance to volcanic domes in northern California <br />and Oregon. They are interpreted to be the result of upward movement of <br />magma that has warped the overlying rock and in some cases spilled out on the surface as lava.<br /><br />"The irregular lines of hills that cross this lunar scene diagonally appear as wavelets <br />washing across shallow beach areas on Earth. These hills have apparently been <br />formed from lava flowing out through cracks in the Moon's crust."<br /><br />======================================================<br /><br />Below Marius Hills, as seen from Lunar Orbiter 2.<br /><br />It is amazing, the image quality from the Lunar Orbiters. Would not have thought it was <br />the mid 1960s. <br /><br />The <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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"Lunar Orbiter IV was about 17,00 miles above the Moon on May 25, 1967,<br />when its wide-angle and telephoto cameras simultaneously took the <br />two dramatic photographs paired on these pages," said A. THOMAS YOUNG,<br />Lunar Orbiter Project Office, Langley Research Center, NASA. " The Orientale Basin, <br />appearing as a gigantic ball's-eye on the western limb of the Moon. <br />The Cordillera Mountains, rising some 20 000 feet above the adjacent surface, <br />form the outer ring, which is approximately 600 miles in diameter. <br />The State of New York would easily fit within it.<br /><br />"The telephoto view on the opposite page magnifies in remarkable detail the <br />portion of the wide-angle photograph showing the area just to the right of <br />center of the Orientale Basin.<br /><br />"Large, circular basins such as Imbrium, Crisium, and Orientale are major <br />features on the Moon, and therefore of great importance to lunar science. <br /><br />The sharpness of the features portrayed in these photographs has led many <br />lunar scientists to interpret Orientale to be one of the youngest of the large basins. <br />Orientale's appearance is considered to be typical of how the older basins, such as <br />Imbrium, looked earlier in their long history."<br /><br />The Orientale Basin is centered at 89° W, 15° S, on the extreme western edge of the <br />Moon's visible side. It is interpreted as having been formed by the impact of a giant <br />meteorite or comet nucleus, and as being only partly filled by the younger, <br />dark volcanic material.<br /><br />Its outer rim is covered by ejecta hurled from the basin. Within Orientale's outer ring, <br />the Rook Mountains, seen in the upper-right portion of the telephoto view, form <br />another circular scarp, about 400 miles in diameter. At the center of the Orientale <br />Basin is the dark Mare Orientale, which is about 186 miles in diameter.<br /><br />---------------------------------------------------------------------------- <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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Below.<br /><br />This rock-strewn area," explained FRED A. ZIHLMAN, Lunar and Planetary Programs, NASA, <br />"is situated in the southeastern part of Mare Tranquillitatis. Some <br />of the larger rocks are about 30 feet across. This photograph, covering an <br />area 1,200 by 1,500 feet, is enlarged five times from the original filmstrips.<br /><br />"The photograph is interesting because of the relatively large size of the rocks shown <br />and because of the circular distribution of rocks in the center of the picture. <br />Some lunar scientists suggest that the rocks were broken and excavated from <br />subsurface layers by meteoric impacts, and that in this area which is part of a <br />ridge, finer ejecta material has been gradually removed by some 'mass-wasting' <br />process that uncovered the rocks in the process of filling the impact craters.<br /><br />"Distributions of rocks were also photographed by Surveyors 1 and 3 <br />in the region of Oceanus ProcelIarum. <br />Surveyor I pictures show a fairly large number of blocks on the horizon, <br />the coarser ones about 3 feet across. At the Surveyor III landing site. the coarsest <br />blocks, scattered mainly in two distinct strewn fields, range in size from a few <br />inches to approximately 6 feet across. The rocks shown above. considerably larger <br />than those photographed by Surveyors 1 and 3, may have been raised by larger <br />meteoric impacts and from greater depths."<br /><br />----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /><br />Thought I would throw this in. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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The color-reconstituted photograph at top right," said J. J. RENNILSON, of the <br />Jet Propulsion Laboratory, "is the first one in which man has been able to observe <br />an eclipse of the Sun by his own planet. Surveyor 3 took the view from the <br />Moon with the wide-angle mode of its TV camera.<br /><br />"Most prominent in the picture is the white cap of light caused by the bending of <br />the Sun's light as it passed through the Earth's atmosphere. The cap<br />is much brighter than the rest because of the Sun's proximity to that limb, <br />causing a greater proportion of sunlight to be refracted. The beaded appearance <br />around the remaining portion of the Earth's atmosphere is due largely to the interruption <br />of the band of light by overcast areas. A small portion at the right of the s<br />olar-eclipse photograph was obscured by an edge of the camera's mirror.<br /><br />"Blue light from the Sun is scattered out of the beam during passage through <br />the Earth's atmosphere, leaving mostly the green, yellow, and red portions <br />of the spectrum. A careful study of this and other lunar photographs of the solar eclipse <br />will enable scientists to understand better the optical properties of our atmosphere." <br /> <br />"The historic color photograph of the crescent Earth
, commented <br />ROBERT F. GARBARINI, former Deputy Associate Administrator (Engineering), <br />Office of Space Science and Applications, "was taken from the Moon's <br />surface by Surveyor 3 on April 30, 1967. <br />Only because of the tilt of the spacecraft and the favorable libration of the <br />Moon was it possible to catch the Earth in the camera's wide-angle field of view."<br /><br />On a later Surveyor mission, it was possible to command the camera <br />to take narrow-angle photographs of the Earth having much higher resolution.<br /><br />----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /><br />Images Below. <br /><br />And <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>​
 
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