Possible cause of cosmological redshift observations?

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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Look at the math used in the paper I cited. Einstein admitted that ASC could give the same results :) All measurements of c are two-way velocity measurements, not one-way. :)
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Helio, I do like SR or ESC vs. ASC. It is only recently that I started to understand ASC and implications in astronomy. It is intriguing. An object like M31, the Andromeda galaxy, there is no one-way speed of c measurement (thus no definite clock measurement of light-time to earth from M31) but some may argue for alpha fine structure constant, however ASC could give this too. There are folks exploring the whole issue now. The paper I cited is an example. The big problem, millions and billions of years of light-time in the universe could collapse using ASC. If ESC is used, all that long, light-time to earth can be maintained.
 
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Jun 1, 2020
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If round trip measurements are required, is the new standard for the meter, based on the speed of light, dependent on the direction it is done. What am I missing?
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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From what I understand about ASC, it is always the round-trip time for velocity of c and so long as that round-trip time = c, that is what you will observe and measure. The one-way trip time can be very different in ASC vs. ESC or SR. Remember, various groups are now exploring this in astronomy, I anticipate more reports coming out but will wait and see Helio. You know as well as I do that there is no one-way velocity measurement of c from M31 to earth, the light-time used in astronomy is based upon SR interpretation, not ASC which the one-way trip time to earth can be very different. Part of the problem, Einstein acknowledged this and apparently in astronomy, that is not common knowledge today. Let me clear though, I prefer SR or ESC solution in all of this, it makes things easier :)
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Helio, in SR a photon traveling at c does not experience time, t=0. In theory, that photon can exist everywhere in the universe at the same time :)
 
Helio, in SR a photon traveling at c does not experience time, t=0. In theory, that photon can exist everywhere in the universe at the same time :)
Does that not mean that all Cartesian coordinates shrink to zero?

Sorry. I am not a mathematician, and only a part-time philosopher.

Cat :)
 
And Rod, me auld mate, does not "a photon traveling at c does not experience time," My emphasis.
Does this not sound a teeny bit anthropomorphic?

I did not quite understand the double negative.

Cat :)
 

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