recording tonight's Perseid shower...how?

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msdrpk

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Hello,<br /><br /><br /> I’m new here, and I’m not sure if I’ll get the help I need in time for tonight’s Perseid Meteor Shower. I live in South Western Ontario Canada. I’d like to know how the show will be from my location. I’d also like the video tape it. Now I’m miles behind you all here. I really don’t know much when it comes to astronomy , bit I love watching the stars. I’ve tried to find info on how to go about video taping the shower, but I’ve been stumped. All the info I find is for people that have very advanced telescopes, cameras, and video cameras. I have a simple camcorder it is : Panasonic Model # SDR-H18. It has O.I.S Optical Image Stabilizer, 32 X Optical Zoom <br /> I don’t know if any of this helps, or if you know anything about this video camera. I hope you do and can tell me if it’s possible and if so how to set up my camera to do it.<br /><br /> Thanks for any help, and I hope to hear from someone soon…before nightfall.<br />Melissa<br /><br />
 
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drwayne

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Moved from "'Technology"<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>"1) Give no quarter; 2) Take no prisoners; 3) Sink everything."  Admiral Jackie Fisher</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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In the time available, just point it at the sky and let it run.<br /><br />The shower is supposed to have a peak around midnight for you, dip down slightly, then increase until dawn.<br /><br />Look at as much af the sky as you can (no zoom), and point the camera about 60 degrees above the horizon toward the ESE or SE.<br /><br />I'll give you more detail afterward, but that's about all I can fit in now.<br /><br />Meteor Wayne<br /><br />PS welcome to SDC!! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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docm

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First find a dark place with little, if any, artificial lighting.<br /><br />I like using stills, so a 35mm SLR camera equipped with a wide angle lens of 35mm and 36 exposure rolls of ISO 400 film does the trick. Mount on a tripod and aim in the direction of the meteor showers origin. <br /><br />Set the f-stop wide open, the focus to infinity, the manual exposure to "B" (time exposure) and use a cable release to lock it open for 2-4 minutes/frame starting an hour or so before the peak. If after that time you've seen no meteors shoot the next frame and so on.<br /><br />It might take a couple of rolls, but you should catch some goodies. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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