So if a SOL is a day.

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theoak6221

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<p>Then what would a week or a month be? (if you where on Mars that is)</p><p><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif" border="0" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" />&nbsp;</p>
 
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schmack

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Then what would a week or a month be? (if you where on Mars that is)&nbsp; <br />Posted by theoak6221</DIV><br /><br />A&nbsp;week would still&nbsp;be 7 sols, bearing in mind that the seven day week is supposed to have come from the time it took god to create the heavens and the earth, with a rest on the seventh day.&nbsp;A month would be however long it takes for the two moons to go through their respective phases, I would presume. Anyone have a better answer? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4" color="#ff0000"><font size="2">Assumption is the mother of all stuff ups</font> </font></p><p><font size="4" color="#ff0000">Gimme some Schmack Schmack!</font></p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Then what would a week or a month be? (if you where on Mars that is)&nbsp; <br />Posted by theoak6221</DIV></p><p><br /><br /><font size="2"><font size="2">Time on Mars</font></font></p><p><font size="2">(Google is your friend)</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Time on Mars(Google is your friend) <br />Posted by boris1961</DIV><br /><br />Owww, that hurt my brain... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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<p><font color="#666699"><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Then what would a week or a month be? (if you where on Mars that is)&nbsp; <br /> Posted by theoak6221</DIV></font><br />We haven't even agreed on the "perfect" calendar on Earth yet.</p>http://calendopedia.com/modern.htm <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>A&nbsp;week would still&nbsp;be 7 sols, bearing in mind that the seven day week is supposed to have come from the time it took god to create the heavens and the earth, with a rest on the seventh day.&nbsp;A month would be however long it takes for the two moons to go through their respective phases, I would presume. Anyone have a better answer? <br /> Posted by schmack</DIV></p><p>Well, a Martian sol is 1.03 days.&nbsp; Phobos takes 0.32 days to orbit Mars, and Deimos takes 1.26.&nbsp; So evidently a lunar month on Mars is not a terribly useful period of time. </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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keermalec

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Well, a Martian sol is 1.03 days.&nbsp; Phobos takes 0.32 days to orbit Mars, and Deimos takes 1.26.&nbsp; So evidently a lunar month on Mars is not a terribly useful period of time. &nbsp; <br />Posted by CalliArcale</DIV><br /><br />Zubrin uses the signs of the zodiac to divide the martian year into 12 equal months. Only strange thing is he chooses to name the current month by the sign in which Mars would be seen if viewed from... the sun! Why in heaven's name (no pun intended) would he not&nbsp;name the month from the sign in which the sun would be viewed from Mars? That is what astrologers do on Earth and would make the most sense to me. He is sort of half-re-inventing the wheel here.</p><p>The celestial sphere is divided into 88 constellations, twelve of which are bissected by the plane of the ecliptic. these twelve are the signs of the zodiac. Viewed from any planet or the sun, any other planet, the sun, and a planet's moons&nbsp;move through these twelve signs. To me the most sensible way of naming months on mars would be to use the name of the constellation in which the sun is currently passing. This would give:</p><p><u>Northern Summer</u><br />Pisces (330&deg;) (The Fish) <br />Aries (0&deg;) (The Ram) <br />Taurus (30&deg;) (The Bull) </p><p><u>Northern Fall</u><br />Gemini (60&deg;) (The Twins) <br />Cancer (90&deg;) (The Crab) <br />Leo (120&deg;) (The Lion) </p><p><u>Northern Winter</u><br />Virgo (150&deg;) (The Virgin) <br />Libra (180&deg;) (The Scale) <br />Scorpio (210&deg;) (The Scorpion) </p><p><u>Northern Spring</u><br />Sagittarius (240&deg;) (The Archer) <br />Capricorn (270&deg;) (The Sea-goat) <br />Aquarius (300&deg;) (The Water-bearer)</p><p>Logically, each martian day should be divided into 55 or 56 sols. However, I believe each sol should be divided into Earth hours, minutes and seconds, with the 25th hour&nbsp;having only 25 minutes. Now would it make sense to group sols into groups of seven and call them martian weeks? That may be open to some debate as the origin of the seven-day week is, as Schmack pointed out, religious. In order to keep things universal, it may be interesting to invent a new, say 10-day week for Mars. We could then simply name the days day1 day2 day3 etc like the portuguese amongst others do.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>“An error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.” John F. Kennedy</em></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p>Just a small point, the ecliptic actually passes through Ophiuchus as well, between Scorpio and Sagittarius.</p><p>I spent several hours last night looking at that very spot while meteor observing this morning :)</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Just a small point, the ecliptic actually passes through Ophiuchus as well, between Scorpio and Sagittarius.I spent several hours last night looking at that very spot while meteor observing this morning :) <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2">Also as viewed from Mars, the Martian ecliptic also passes through a small portion of Cetus for approx 4 sols, so from Mars, the Sun passes through 14 constellations.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.</font></strong><br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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keermalec

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<p>This is very interesting: maybe the matian year should be divided into 13 or 14 equal martian "months". Ophiucus really is on the ecliptic and probably should be counted as a 13th sign of the zodiac. It probably wasn't because the ancients needed 12 and not 13 signs for mathematical reasons. Cetus just slightly pokes onto the ecliptic during Mars' northern summer but before and after Cetus lies Pisces, which would create a rather strange calendar. Probably Cetus should be included in the Month of Pisces.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>“An error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.” John F. Kennedy</em></p> </div>
 
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neilsox

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As the other posated,&nbsp;a day on Mars is only slightly longer than an Earth day. Earth time is skewed by the constantly changing lenth of time it takes radio to travel from Earth to Mars. &nbsp;Months, centuries, decades,&nbsp;minutes&nbsp;and weeks are almost meaningless on Mars:&nbsp;My guess is we will use approximately Earth universal&nbsp;time, or metric time based on the Martian day, year or the Earth second.&nbsp;Pico seconds, to giga seconds are&nbsp;likely best.&nbsp; Neil
 
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